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Ok, so here's the deal. I never was pre-med, nor am I. I am actually planning on attending graduate school and doing research in chemistry as a career, but it's not that I never gave medical school a thought at all. I'm just making this thread for fun.

I want you guys to "chance" me. I have a low GPA (3.20), very little volunteer work (tutoring during freshman year, that's about it), and absolutely no clinical experience.

My research experience includes a summer REU (polymer chemistry), an Amgen Scholars summer program (biochemistry), and 2 years of research at my home institution (computiational/physical chemistry).

I go to a top 20 school. Also, let's assume I do average on the MCAT (nothing stellar, but not shabby either). What shot do I have for medical school? I am not familiar with med school admissions at all, so I probably left out tons of important details that med schools consider.

BTW, I mean just any credible med school, not Harvard or Stanford, etc.

Thanks!
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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No clinical experience = no medical schools.
More or less a 3.2 in chem won't get you into a medical school unless you have a great mcat. That being said average is a very broad term, if by average you would mean a 24 < average of all mcats taken> or 30 < average of mcat's of people admitted>.
So hypothetically very low chances. If you however go for DO you could get in by redoing a few low grade classes and getting a good mcat (28+).

Mod's move this to ~ What are my chances section~
 
Feb 17, 2010
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Why don't you read through the forums? However SDN can be somewhat overwhelming so I'm a fan of books.
Look at the AMCAS website? aamc.org
Get an Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR), the book is like $15 or less on Amazon. It tells you which each accredited med school requires specifically.
Another great book is Med School Confidential (currently reading it). This book goes step by step through each part of going to med school - premed, med school, residency. MCAT is a little outdated since it was before it became computerized but I still find it useful and it will be useful further down the road.
Find a premed advisor. You'll need to find one eventually for LORs (Letters of Recommendation).
Also find out if your school has a premed club.

I don't think your chances are that high at the moment but if you put in the effort you can bring them up.

First you need clinical experience. Try becoming a certified nursing assistant (CNA) super easy and pretty decent pay or maybe do some Hospice volunteering. Other options are shadowing a physician, EMT (emergency medical technician), volunteering at a hospital (harder for this to be considered clinical), ER scribe.

Also you need to boost your GPA think of a 3.6 to be competitive (anything lower isn't). If you're an undergrad you still have a chance. Find the premed advisor at your school and talk to him. If you've graduated you need to consider post bacc, getting a masters, or a special master's program (SMP).

Oh and finally you don't want to get average on your MCAT you want to dominate so consider taking a study class if you need help keeping on track (I know I need this) or setting a schedule to study ahead of time. I would say minimal 3 months

**On an unrelated note I hate when people post on SDN (Student Doctor Network) with all these acronyms. Sometimes it's really hard to track down their definitions so please just post their definition at least once in the thread before referring to them by their acronym. hanks.
 

LuciusVorenus

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Like it was said above
no clinical/volunteering already puts you at a 0% chance.
 

apumic

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Why don't you read through the forums? However SDN can be somewhat overwhelming so I'm a fan of books.
Look at the AMCAS website? aamc.org
Get an Medical School Admission Requirements (MSAR), the book is like $15 or less on Amazon. It tells you which each accredited med school requires specifically.
Another great book is Med School Confidential (currently reading it). This book goes step by step through each part of going to med school - premed, med school, residency. MCAT is a little outdated since it was before it became computerized but I still find it useful and it will be useful further down the road.
Find a premed advisor. You'll need to find one eventually for LORs (Letters of Recommendation).
Also find out if your school has a premed club.

I don't think your chances are that high at the moment but if you put in the effort you can bring them up.

First you need clinical experience. Try becoming a certified nursing assistant (CNA) super easy and pretty decent pay or maybe do some Hospice volunteering. Other options are shadowing a physician, EMT (emergency medical technician), volunteering at a hospital (harder for this to be considered clinical), ER scribe.

Also you need to boost your GPA think of a 3.6 to be competitive (anything lower isn't). If you're an undergrad you still have a chance. Find the premed advisor at your school and talk to him. If you've graduated you need to consider post bacc, getting a masters, or a special master's program (SMP).

Oh and finally you don't want to get average on your MCAT you want to dominate so consider taking a study class if you need help keeping on track (I know I need this) or setting a schedule to study ahead of time. I would say minimal 3 months

**On an unrelated note I hate when people post on SDN (Student Doctor Network) with all these acronyms. Sometimes it's really hard to track down their definitions so please just post their definition at least once in the thread before referring to them by their acronym. hanks.

OP stated no actual desire to go to med school (actually expressed a desire for grad school instead). This is supposed to be hypothetical.

Anyway... yes, w/o clinical experience your chances are pretty much shot right there.

The GPA is also a good standard deviation (a little more actually) below what is typically accepted. An average MCAT (24) wouldn't get you even close. Most people who get in are (on average) a full standard deviation above the mean (30-32 or the 84th percentile).

Hypothetically, you have almost no chance.
 

Morsetlis

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I don't quite understand why the MSAR quotes a figure at usually about only 70-85% of all matriculants at specific schools would have "clinical experience". Now I'm sure nobody got in without at least one of volunteering/clinical/research, but is clinical experience really required?

Conventional wisdom says, yes, it's required, but then I wonder about the MSAR numbers.
 

LizzyM

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I don't quite understand why the MSAR quotes a figure at usually about only 70-85% of all matriculants at specific schools would have "clinical experience". Now I'm sure nobody got in without at least one of volunteering/clinical/research, but is clinical experience really required?

Conventional wisdom says, yes, it's required, but then I wonder about the MSAR numbers.

Where do those data come from? If it comes from "volunteer, clinical" on the AMCAS then I can see why only 70-85% might have it. The remainder might have had "employment, non-military" or "employment, military" of a clinical nature or may be in a 6 or 7 year BA/MD program that doesn't require much of anything. There are also those driven MD/PhD students with all sorts of research experience but no clinical experience--I'm not a big fan but I've seen it happen. There are also those folks who have had extensive clinical experience personally (multiple admissions, weeks in a hospital bed and/or years of care for a chronic condition) or in the care of a family member or close friend with a serious condition.
 

Marcus Brody

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Ok, so here's the deal. I never was pre-med, nor am I. I am actually planning on attending graduate school and doing research in chemistry as a career, but it's not that I never gave medical school a thought at all. I'm just making this thread for fun.

I want you guys to "chance" me. I have a low GPA (3.20), very little volunteer work (tutoring during freshman year, that's about it), and absolutely no clinical experience.

My research experience includes a summer REU (polymer chemistry), an Amgen Scholars summer program (biochemistry), and 2 years of research at my home institution (computiational/physical chemistry).

I go to a top 20 school. Also, let's assume I do average on the MCAT (nothing stellar, but not shabby either). What shot do I have for medical school? I am not familiar with med school admissions at all, so I probably left out tons of important details that med schools consider.

BTW, I mean just any credible med school, not Harvard or Stanford, etc.

Thanks!
[youtube]GftcVbxNyao[/youtube]
 

Morsetlis

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I guess our advice would be to pursue science, and if you actually want medicine, start going to hospitals ;p
 

LizzyM

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The OP's question is really, "am I good enough?"

Assuming the OP is white, and assuming an "average" performance on the MCAT within the pool of white folks who apply, the chances of being admitted are in the 20-30% range, most likely on the low end of that range without clinical experience.

With an MCAT at >95th percentile (35+), the chances would go above average for all white applicants, but would still be in the range of 50-50.

If the OP isn't interested in a career in medicine, he need not do anything different than he's doing now.
 
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With such a low GPA, I think you'd need a 35+ on the MCAT to have a decent chance, besides fixing the problem with sparse ECs. The research you've done would help if you beef up the rest. I'd try to end with a steep upward grade trend besides, via a postbac. If your MCAT score was in the average-for-acceptee range of 31 or so, you'd need to complete an SMP to be a really viable candidate for med schools. As you stand at this time, you have no shot at med schools in the US.