Do I stand a chance in Hell? Any help would be appreciated

redwings54

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Hello. I posted this on the DO forum too, but I figured different people read each. I was wondering if I had a chance at going DO or MD. I really like the DO philosophy, but am not sure if I fully understand the true differences between osteo and allopathic medicine. As for me, I graduated my undergrad with a 3.1 gpa and a 2.79 science. I got a 25 on the MCATS and took them twice already. Recently, I just returned from a fellowship studying holistic medicine. It was supossed to be a year but I had to cut it short for personal reasons. I have two summers of chem research and a publication, but no clinical experiences yet. I am now hoping to either work in a hospital or as a toxicologist for the state police. I did a lot of volunteer work with children including heading a project for two years. I also plan on taking classes in the summer and fall to help with my science GPA. Recently, I was also diagnosed with a small case of a bi-polar-esque disorder. I am getting better, but looking back on my time in college, I can honestly say that much of the difficulties I went through academically were partly due to my disorder. I want to be a doctor more than anything. I really want to help children. Do I stand a chance in hell of getting in? What should I do? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks and good luck to you all.
 

MWillie

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I think you have a reasonable chance at a D.O. and a somewhat less reasonable chance at an MD.
 

seethrew

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I think anyone has a chance. Your numbers are definitely a little lower than average, so that makes it hard, but you do have a chance. People get in at even the best schools with low numbers, but odds are tough. Some DO schools might be wise. Have you thought of natropathy (an ND) or ayurvedic medicine (probably spelling wrong)? - it might interest your holistic side. There are a whole realm of eastern medicines that do not require MCAT - not that that is your only option, they are just wicked cool.

I think your experience will be really important, so foster that. Maybe take some more classes and ace em. It may help to show that you are managiing your own personal health problems. MCAT again perhaps - if you think you can improve. Have you taken any MCAT courses? When are you applying?

Have you browsed mdapplicants.com? Some stuff is fake, but some is geniune and can give you perspective.

If you want to be an MD or DO I say take a chance no matter what. You never know what doors may open. You will NEVER know if you don't try! :luck:
 

bigbassinbob

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I think you stand a chance at getting into osteopathic school, but it will be very tough for you to get into an allopathic school in the US. If you're not entirely sure of the differences b/w DO and MD, the osteopathic thread has some great links that will point you in the right direction (at the very top of the page). If you really want to help people, stick with being a real physician (DO or MD) and not ND or other "holistic" types of practices as the previous poster mentioned. If you are really into alternative medicine, then you may want to read up on it, but in the end you will be able to help the most people as a doctor. Most of America dismisses these other types of medical practices as quackery. Good luck.
 

fateema368

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If you want a DO, you have a shot and could apply as early as the next ap cycle, however if want any Allopathic things will be tough. You're best chance is to enter a post-bac, and study your butt off for the MCAT's-you'll have to get a good score, no justifications, your GPA is just too low otherswise.
 

OSUdoc08

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fateema368 said:
If you want a DO, you have a shot and could apply as early as the next ap cycle, however if want any Allopathic things will be tough. You're best chance is to enter a post-bac, and study your butt off for the MCAT's-you'll have to get a good score, no justifications, your GPA is just too low otherswise.
To give you some perspective,

I was rejected from some D.O. schools without an interview, but I was granted an interview with one of the top 10 M.D. schools in the nation.

There is no way to delinate the chances of an applicant's acceptance to an M.D. school vs. a D.O. school. If you have a chance for one, then you have a chance for the other.
 

MWillie

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OSUdoc08 said:
To give you some perspective,

I was rejected from some D.O. schools without an interview, but I was granted an interview with one of the top 10 M.D. schools in the nation.

There is no way to delinate the chances of an applicant's acceptance to an M.D. school vs. a D.O. school. If you have a chance for one, then you have a chance for the other.
Preach on brotha!
 

45408

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No, hell doesn't want you.
 

Shades McCool

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redwings54 said:
Hello. I posted this on the DO forum too, but I figured different people read each. I was wondering if I had a chance at going DO or MD. I really like the DO philosophy, but am not sure if I fully understand the true differences between osteo and allopathic medicine. As for me, I graduated my undergrad with a 3.1 gpa and a 2.79 science. I got a 25 on the MCATS and took them twice already. Recently, I just returned from a fellowship studying holistic medicine. It was supossed to be a year but I had to cut it short for personal reasons. I have two summers of chem research and a publication, but no clinical experiences yet. I am now hoping to either work in a hospital or as a toxicologist for the state police. I did a lot of volunteer work with children including heading a project for two years. I also plan on taking classes in the summer and fall to help with my science GPA. Recently, I was also diagnosed with a small case of a bi-polar-esque disorder. I am getting better, but looking back on my time in college, I can honestly say that much of the difficulties I went through academically were partly due to my disorder. I want to be a doctor more than anything. I really want to help children. Do I stand a chance in hell of getting in? What should I do? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks and good luck to you all.

Did you meet Ricky Williams?
 

Law2Doc

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OSUdoc08 said:
To give you some perspective,

I was rejected from some D.O. schools without an interview, but I was granted an interview with one of the top 10 M.D. schools in the nation.

There is no way to delinate the chances of an applicant's acceptance to an M.D. school vs. a D.O. school. If you have a chance for one, then you have a chance for the other.
While there is certainly some crapshoot element involved in the application process, it cannot be denied that on average the GPA/MCAT numbers posted by DO matriculants is lower than by MD matriculants. DO schools are also reportedly more forgiving in their treatment of retaken classes and retaken MCATs than some allopathic school as well. Not to say that some people don't choose DO over MD for non-numerical reasons (as OSUdoc apparently did), but for the OP with his numbers, the DO seems to be the most likely route to success without substantial additional course work.
 

OSUdoc08

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Law2Doc said:
While there is certainly some crapshoot element involved in the application process, it cannot be denied that on average the GPA/MCAT numbers posted by DO matriculants is lower than by MD matriculants. DO schools are also reportedly more forgiving in their treatment of retaken classes and retaken MCATs than some allopathic school as well. Not to say that some people don't choose DO over MD for non-numerical reasons (as OSUdoc apparently did), but for the OP with his numbers, the DO seems to be the most likely route to success without substantial additional course work.
I agree. However, there isn't any reason to not throw in some M.D. applications as well, if that is what one is truly interested in.
 

stinkycheese

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OSUdoc08 said:
To give you some perspective,

I was rejected from some D.O. schools without an interview, but I was granted an interview with one of the top 10 M.D. schools in the nation.
And... did you get in? If not, then I don't see the validity of bringing up your experience as "unpredictable".

There is no way to delinate the chances of an applicant's acceptance to an M.D. school vs. a D.O. school. If you have a chance for one, then you have a chance for the other.
A greater chance at DO schools as a group though, given their lower stats.
 

bigbassinbob

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OSUdoc08 said:
To give you some perspective,

I was rejected from some D.O. schools without an interview, but I was granted an interview with one of the top 10 M.D. schools in the nation.

There is no way to delinate the chances of an applicant's acceptance to an M.D. school vs. a D.O. school. If you have a chance for one, then you have a chance for the other.
In general, D.O. schools are easier to get into than M.D. schools. I think it's important for the OP to know that since he or she will be applying soon. I'll give you a statistic from my personal experience that shows this. My acceptance rate post-interview at D.O. schools is 100%, while at M.D. schools, so far, it is 7%. Don't get me wrong, I'm still very much debating where I will end up next year and leaning toward an osteopathic school at this point, but the OP should know the facts.
 

gdubb

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I think there's always a chance. If this is something you really want to do, then I wouldn't give up on it. My MCAT is not that great, yet I have gotten interviews in and out of state. I think as long as you have experience, motivation, and great LORs then you stand a chance. I would check into doing a summer program for medical school. Those can really improve your application provided you do well. Another option would be to look at DO schools. You might can even use your health problems as an advantage since this has exposed you to the medical field as a patient. If you really want to be a doctor and help children, don't give up that dream. Good luck!! :luck: :luck: :luck:
 

OSUdoc08

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stinkycheese said:
And... did you get in? If not, then I don't see the validity of bringing up your experience as "unpredictable".



A greater chance at DO schools as a group though, given their lower stats.
While this is true as a whole, there are many M.D. schools that have lower stats than some of the top D.O. schools (including the D.O. schools that are nationally ranked alongside M.D. schools.)

I do agree, however, that it would be much easier to get into some of the lower tier D.O. schools.

This does not mean that one should only apply to the schools with the lowest averages. There are people who get into top schools with low scores, because this is not all that they look at.
 
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redwings54

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Thanks everyone. You all are helping me a great deal. Does it matter that I attended a fairly prestigious undergrad? It was a Nescac school,ranked 18th in the nation, if that matters at all. I plan on taking classes at my local college over the summer and fall to help boost my GPA and also to get anatomy which I never had. I come from NH. What are some of the higher tier DO schools? Or really any schools I stand a chance at in the northeast? Thanks all.
 

Old_Mil

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You have a shot at being admitted to lower tier DO school assuming that the rest of your resume is impressive (and it sounds like you have done some interesting stuff).

Unless you're a URM (black/hispanic/native american) you probably won't get any MD admissions.
 

beanbean

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I completely agree with your plan of taking some classes and acing them. A solid group of post-bacc "A's" can show your true abilities.

When you took the MCAT previously I assume you had not been treated for your illness. Perhaps now that you have had some treatment, your score would be better. If you don't think you will score better...don't take it again. However, you may want to try preparing and see how you do on some practice tests. A boost in your MCAT with some post-bacc classes could be very helpful.

Deirdre
 

mwhou

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Are you asking: Where can I get in when I apply in June? or Will I have a chance EVER?

If applying this summer, I agree w/ the posters above - you may have some luck, but the rest of your app would have to be REALLY good & you would have to apply to lot$$ of schools. Slim chances, but a chance. Summer programs are a good idea. Talk to the deans of some schools.

Are you willing to wait a year or more and take additional course work to improve your GPA?

12 months of 4.0 could raise your GPA to 3.36, 24 months to 3.51 - assuming heavy/creative class loads and that you now have 120 hrs of college work.

2 yrs is prob. really unneccessary, a one year postbacc program w/linkage might be the best place to go if you are willing to move. Many of these programs have MCAT components as well. Check BU, georgetown, drexel, chicago med, TCOM, and others. I liked what I heard about the drexel program. The problem is your numbers don't convince adcoms that you can handle the medical coursework. Few schools will risk admitting someone they think will flunk out. The postbac programs allow you to SHOW them by taking medical school courses, that you can succeed. Thus, without having to take 2yrs+ additional coursework, you satisfy them, and make it past pre-interview screening.


DO YOU HAVE A CHANCE?? Thankfully, that is really up to you, what your goals are, and what additional work you are willing to put into the process.
 

stinkycheese

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mwhou said:
2 yrs is prob. really unneccessary, a one year postbacc program w/linkage might be the best place to go if you are willing to move.
Most post-baccs with linkage are not remediation programs, but programs for non-trads who haven't already done their pre-med reqs.

Many of these programs have MCAT components as well. Check BU, georgetown, drexel, chicago med, TCOM, and others.
These are masters' programs, not post-bacs, and they do not have linkage programs.
 

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stinkycheese said:
Most post-baccs with linkage are not remediation programs, but programs for non-trads who haven't already done their pre-med reqs.



These are masters' programs, not post-bacs, and they do not have linkage programs.
TCOM has a post-bac program (1-year), but it is not linked.
OSU-COM has a post-bacc program (10year) which IS linked.