do med schools give preference to its undergrads

rockaction

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A friend of mine got rejected from his school's medical school because they "reached their maximum of allotted spaces for School X undergraduates". So I guess it works both ways. In essence, you could be competing with the other undergraduates from your school.
 
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SirGecko

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well the title says it all...

anyone know if medical schools have any preference for its university undergraduates?

They usually get a lot of undergraduates from their own university. The plus side is they know those applicants pretty well because they have a lot of experience with the program they went through. The downside is you are competing with a lot of the other premeds at your school. I went to an undergrad with a highly ranked medical school and they take the more of their own undergrad students each year than any other individual undergrad. Then again they produce a *lot* of premeds so you still need to be a rock star.

In short: don't pick your undergraduate school based on what medical school you would like to attend.
 

Mattabet

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Some schools do have an explicit preference for their undergrads (I believe Creighton is one of them), some have a given number of spots they can give out, and some schools have a preference for not their undergrads.

This speaks to a bigger idea in academia, that you want diversity in the education of those at your institution. It's the same reason that in many cases, people that earn their Ph. D. once place will be (gently) compelled to go work & get tenure elsewhere, so that the faculty remains heterogeneous.

In this vein, Northwestern doesn't take a lot of it's own undergrads, and the ones it does are through special admission (ie, 7 year BS/MD programs) to avoid inundating it's medical school class. Ah well. Go Cats!
 
Also, if it's not the same school what about schools that are similar and close by?

For example: I go to UC Berkeley, and I am applying to UCSF. Do I get any advantage? Berkeley has no medical school and many Berkeley graduates apply to UCSF.
 

apumic

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Some schools do have an explicit preference for their undergrads (I believe Creighton is one of them), some have a given number of spots they can give out, and some schools have a preference for not their undergrads.

This speaks to a bigger idea in academia, that you want diversity in the education of those at your institution. It's the same reason that in many cases, people that earn their Ph. D. once place will be (gently) compelled to go work & get tenure elsewhere, so that the faculty remains heterogeneous.

In this vein, Northwestern doesn't take a lot of it's own undergrads, and the ones it does are through special admission (ie, 7 year BS/MD programs) to avoid inundating it's medical school class. Ah well. Go Cats!


+1

If you're considering any kind of clinical-clinical research career, academic inbreeding is a bad idea....
 
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