stoic

"Time you enjoy wasting, was not wasted"
15+ Year Member
Nov 4, 2000
7,635
356
sodom, south georgia
So there has been a lot of discussion in the osteo forum about the need (or lack thereof) to change the name of an osteopathic medical degree. The arguement is that Doctor of Osteopathy (DO) does not accurately reflect the scope or nature of a DO's medical practice - after all, allopaths are doctors of medicine, not doctors of allopathy. Many in the other forum has indicated a desire to be known as MD-O's.

I'm curious as to the thoughts on this side of the fence.
 

exmike

NOR * CAL
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 19, 2003
4,206
11
43
Bay Area
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
I think it would only add to the confusion since some people are accustomed to the DO moniker.
 

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
I don't think it should change. If there is going to be a change, they should change it to MD.

The AOA and AMA will eventually merge and when this happens, the title will change to MD.
 
About the Ads

Mr. Rosewater

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2003
796
0
erf
Status (Visible)
what interest has the AMA expressed in absorbing the DO schools? why would they want to do that?
 

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by Mr. Rosewater
what interest has the AMA expressed in absorbing the DO schools? why would they want to do that?
They already tried to do this in CA. They made all the DOs purchase an MD degree in the 1960s, mainly due to AMA lobbying against DOs.

Back in history, the AMA has always thought of the AOA as infridging on their turf. There are DO hospitals and this inevitably takes business away from allopathic hospitals.

Currently, many ACGME residencies are becoming dually accredited as AOA residencies as well. The amount of DOs entering into allopathic (ACGME) residencies is increasing each year. DOs are becoming directors of major allopathic residency programs and DOs are entering into academic medicine at allopathic schools.

AMA has already tried to merge with the AOA but the AOA has refused to give in and wants to be distinct. I'm not sure the reason why but in time things will get to the point where the two will reconcile differences and merge together.

To anyone interested, here is a link to a recent discussion that is similar to this topic...
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?s=&threadid=107683&perpage=20&pagenumber=1
 

exmike

NOR * CAL
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 19, 2003
4,206
11
43
Bay Area
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
Originally posted by Slickness
They already tried to do this in CA. They made all the DOs purchase an MD degree in the 1960s, mainly due to AMA lobbying against DOs.

Back in history, the AMA has always thought of the AOA as infridging on their turf. There are DO hospitals and this inevitably takes business away from allopathic hospitals.

Currently, many ACGME residencies are becoming dually accredited as AOA residencies as well. The amount of DOs entering into allopathic (ACGME) residencies is increasing each year. DOs are becoming directors of major allopathic residency programs and DOs are entering into academic medicine at allopathic schools.

AMA has already tried to merge with the AOA but the AOA has refused to give in and wants to be distinct. I'm not sure the reason why but in time things will get to the point where the two will reconcile differences and merge together.

To anyone interested, here is a link to a recent discussion that is similar to this topic...
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?s=&threadid=107683&perpage=20&pagenumber=1

i dont see how the two can ever merge given their different philosophies. unless MD's adopted OMT or DO's ditched OMT they'll remain distinct degrees.

And who cares, its just a degree. you're still a physician.
 

ad_sharp

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2003
766
0
39
You never know
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Here's why I think that the AMA and AOA are nowhere near merging together: DOs have a professional resentment toward the MDs because historically the AMA has tried to shut them down, and many MDs see the DOs as sub-par.

To most of us here on SDN, the letters behind the name don't matter because we know that both are fully liscenced, practicing physicians. However, the older generation of DOs have faced their fair share of professional discrimination from MDs and the AMA. They hold the DO degree to be distinct, seperate, and equal to the MD degree. If they were to change the name on their profession to that of an MD, they would lose their professional distinction and identity. Moreover, it would be like joining the group which has tried to shut the profession down for decades. In short, established DOs are proud of their profession and the fact that it has flourished despite the obstacles that were placed in its path.

On the other hand, many MDs are unwilling to admit that DOs are equals, either academically or professionally. It's a "my degree is better than yours" stance that many MDs take on. I see it as unlikely that the MDs that make up the AMA will admit the DO schools unless there are changes in the curriculum.

Lastly, I think that this arguement has been beaten to death. Should the two schools merge? I don't see a very good reason why they shouldn't, but the difference in teaching, philosophy, and professional pride will not allow this to happen for some time. The distinction between the schools of medicine has decreased somewhat recently. If you were a patient who didn't know the difference, it is very unlikely that you would be able to tell the two groups of physicians apart. I've been shadowing DOs for two and a half years and I have yet to see OMT used in the hospital or clinic. Essentially, the goal of both groups is to cure disease and people need to get over the letters behind the name. Both groups can say that they are superior for one reason or another, but in the end, they're just equals.
 

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by ad_sharp
Here's why I think that the AMA and AOA are nowhere near merging together: DOs have a professional resentment toward the MDs because historically the AMA has tried to shut them down, and many MDs see the DOs as sub-par.

To most of us here on SDN, the letters behind the name don't matter because we know that both are fully liscenced, practicing physicians. However, the older generation of DOs have faced their fair share of professional discrimination from MDs and the AMA. They hold the DO degree to be distinct, seperate, and equal to the MD degree. If they were to change the name on their profession to that of an MD, they would lose their professional distinction and identity. Moreover, it would be like joining the group which has tried to shut the profession down for decades. In short, established DOs are proud of their profession and the fact that it has flourished despite the obstacles that were placed in its path.

On the other hand, many MDs are unwilling to admit that DOs are equals, either academically or professionally. It's a "my degree is better than yours" stance that many MDs take on. I see it as unlikely that the MDs that make up the AMA will admit the DO schools unless there are changes in the curriculum.
When the old DOs and MDs die out, their opinions will die with them. The new DOs are becoming increasingly more like MDs. MDs are increasingly becoming more tolerant of DOs. Old views will die with the old physicians. This is why it is feasible to say they may merge in the future whether it be 20 years from now or 100.

The philosophies are different but they teach the exact same thing so it wouldn't really matter and physicians on both sides practice basically the same way. The only thing I can see being a hindrance is OMM. I am not sure how they would deal with this aspect when merging.
 

tofurious

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2003
576
7
45
Atlanta
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
I wonder if any MD cares about how the DOs would like to change their titles. The vetenarians have DVMs and the chiropractors decided to call themselves doctors of chiropractice. No one would ever confuse a DC with an MD though.
 
About the Ads

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
About the name change. I wrote this in the osteo forum but I will include it here...

MDO does not make sense. People will ask what an MDO is then instead of what a DO is. You fall into the same problem that we have now. People don't recognize the name. After all, there are DMDs (dentists) and OMDs (masters of oriental medicine). People may not recognize these names and even if they do they may not know they are fully liscensed physicians. OMDs certainly aren't so why would MDOs be.

If you want real change you would have to change the name to MD. That way, we wouldn't have any problems of recognition or anything like that. However, that's not going to happen because DOs want to maintain distinctiveness. Thus, it is a failed venture and the profession would be much better just keeping it at DO.

There's no use in changing it to a name that will do little to help the public recognize DOs better. If people want real change, then start a petition calling for the title to change from DOs to MDs.
 

Amy B

I miss my son so much
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 7, 2000
4,303
3
Virginia
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Originally posted by STAC
Change it.

M.D.O.

This was my suggestion as well.
Why not MDO, Medical Doctor of Osteopathy

I would like to agree with slickness about when the old docs die, but since I have seen the DO profession here on SDN looked down upon by a bunch of SDNers, I think the negative outlook is here to stay. Sad, but I think true.

Although that said, the majority of those who look down upon it are pre-meders. Perhaps once they go through med school they will see that DOs and MDs work side by side and no one cares about the letters that follow their names.
 

exmike

NOR * CAL
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 19, 2003
4,206
11
43
Bay Area
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
DO's can petition all they want but as long as the AMA/AAMC cartel determines which schools are accredited to give out M.D. degrees along with that type of training and licensure is required to practice as a MD, there will never be a name change.

I really think this argument is redundant. DO's have existed for the longest time alongside MD's, there is no need for change.
 

NRAI2001

3K Member
15+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2001
4,639
53
Cali
Originally posted by Slickness
They already tried to do this in CA. They made all the DOs purchase an MD degree in the 1960s, mainly due to AMA lobbying against DOs.

Back in history, the AMA has always thought of the AOA as infridging on their turf. There are DO hospitals and this inevitably takes business away from allopathic hospitals.

Currently, many ACGME residencies are becoming dually accredited as AOA residencies as well. The amount of DOs entering into allopathic (ACGME) residencies is increasing each year. DOs are becoming directors of major allopathic residency programs and DOs are entering into academic medicine at allopathic schools.

AMA has already tried to merge with the AOA but the AOA has refused to give in and wants to be distinct. I'm not sure the reason why but in time things will get to the point where the two will reconcile differences and merge together.

To anyone interested, here is a link to a recent discussion that is similar to this topic...
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?s=&threadid=107683&perpage=20&pagenumber=1

How can you purchase an MD degree, REALLY im interested.
 

DD214_DOC

Full Member
15+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2003
5,785
895
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
This whole argument is centered around most of you feeling inferior to MDs or tired of explaining what a DO is to people. You're trying to make the freaking degree as close to an MD as possible. Just go to a damn allopathic school and your problem is solved. The time you would spend lobbying to have the degree changed, you could have improved your stats and probably be accepted somewhere.

I mean MOST people won't actually ask because they don't care.

Sorry posted before I was finished.
 

gioia

Full Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2003
556
0
TARDIS
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
I brought the issue to public forum for three reasons:

1. I heard grumblings which invoked the ruminating on my behalf.
2. I contacted the AOA, who encouraged me to encourage others to express themselves to the AOA.
3. I realized a new phenomena exists in the health care field today that did not exist 20 years ago: that of the loose usage of the words physician anddoctor. For instance, Chiropractors and herbalists of different varieties call themselves those names. The titles are misleading and dangerous, particularly, for the DO, whose license is Doctor of Ostepathic Medicine, but whose title is DO.

DISCLAIMER: Nowhere in my presentation, do I believe that I am a sell-out, or an unhappy DO student. Nor do I believe that I ashamed of my calling and the field I will one day represent. I call attention to the issues I believe are pertinent and then implore my fellow students to contact their local representatives.
 

STAC

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2003
464
0
In my underwear
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by exmike
DO's can petition all they want but as long as the AMA/AAMC cartel determines which schools are accredited to give out M.D. degrees along with that type of training and licensure is required to practice as a MD, there will never be a name change.

I really think this argument is redundant. DO's have existed for the longest time alongside MD's, there is no need for change.

Easy for you to say, you are going to a MD school.
 
About the Ads

exmike

NOR * CAL
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 19, 2003
4,206
11
43
Bay Area
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
Originally posted by STAC
Easy for you to say, you are going to a MD school.

Thats really not fair. How often do DO's in the DO forum say how once you're working noone really cares what your degree is? I just dont see why there is a need to abandon the D.O. degree.
 

mky

Junior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Nov 13, 2003
17
0
Status (Visible)
I went to a student forum last year about DO versus MD schools and one woman from an osteo school said that their students are given the option to take the boards for the MD. So they actually can graduate with a DO and MD.

If that's true, it seems easy enough...
 

exmike

NOR * CAL
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 19, 2003
4,206
11
43
Bay Area
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
Originally posted by mky
I went to a student forum last year about DO versus MD schools and one woman from an osteo school said that their students are given the option to take the boards for the MD. So they actually can graduate with a DO and MD.

If that's true, it seems easy enough...


Thats not true. Yes, you can take MD Boards as a DO and do MD residencies, but the actual M.D. is conferred by the school, which must be AAMC accredited.
 

CalBeE

Full Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 14, 2003
2,062
1
Status (Visible)
I heard some people telling me how ridiculously complicated the U.S. health care system is. Having DO and MD is one thing, others things are having Nursing Practitioners and Physician Assistants that have some overlapping duties with primary care physician.

Yea...so I guess I'm pro-having all osteopathic schools converted to allopathic schools instead.
 

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by NRAI2001
Looking to purchase an MD, will pay big $$$$$$$$$$$$$$.
You just missed the boat. In the 1960s, DOs were allowed to purchase an MD degree for $60. You didn't even have to pay big bucks.

Now you may have to go to a caribbean schools for a year or so, take some classes, and they'll give you an MD. This program is for DO graduates. Someone did post a link before but I don't remember it. What a jip.
 

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
To add. UCI medical school used to be the California osteopathic school until some time in the 60s. They changed it after the court rulings and stuff.

HAHA. So UCI used to be a DO school. :laugh:
 

exmike

NOR * CAL
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 19, 2003
4,206
11
43
Bay Area
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
i wonder if there will ever be a carribean DO school. that would be interesting.
 

CalBeE

Full Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 14, 2003
2,062
1
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by Slickness
To add. UCI medical school used to be the California osteopathic school until some time in the 60s. They changed it after the court rulings and stuff.

HAHA. So UCI used to be a DO school. :laugh:

But was it a private Osteopathic school PURCHASED by the UC system? Kinda like how the UC purchased the UCSF hospital in the past?
 

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by CalBeE
But was it a private Osteopathic school PURCHASED by the UC system? Kinda like how the UC purchased the UCSF hospital in the past?
No it was an osteopathic school and due to political reasons, it changed to the UCI medical school. The link has the details. Also, the California Medical Association merged with the California Osteopathic association. This is why I think a merger will eventually happen.

There is a typo in the article. It says USC Irvine medical school but it really is just UCI medical school. If you go to the UCI website it has this in its history.

http://www.opsc.org/history.htm

"The Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons of California (OPSC) was created in 1962 from the ashes of a medical professional decimated by remarkable sequence of political actions previously unimagined in California history. In 1960, California was home to over 2,600 D.O.s, 59 successful osteopathic hospitals and a respected college in Los Angeles. The California Osteopathic Association (COA) was the largest state osteopathic association in the nation.

By 1961, a combination of personal ambition, power plays, and political intrigue had undermined the state?s entire osteopathic medical structure. Proposition 22, climaxing a series of M.D.-D.O. merger negotiations, appeared before the California voters on November 6, 1962. By amending the Osteopathic Initiative Act of 1922, the referendum removed the Board of Osteopathic Examiners power issue licenses to new applicants. It also terminated licensure by reciprocity, and would have closed down the BOE when the number of remaining D.O.s dwindled to 40.

Over 2,000 D.O.s chose or were forced to by a M.D. degree for $65. The College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons (COPS) ? now the USC Irvine School of Medicine-was turned over to the M.D.s for one dollar. The 59 osteopathic hospitals disappeared.

Less than 500 physicians chose to retain the D.O. degree and since no new licenses could be granted, the profession in California was supposed to wither and die. Amid the smoke and ruins of the once proud profession, the stubborn streak in a few dedicated D.O.s prevailed. One night in a dimly lit underground Los Angeles Italian restaurant, a group of 35 D.O.s secretly met to form a new osteopathic organization. Although it may sound melodramatic today, the professional pressures were so great that the group dare not let it be known that there was organized opposition. Richard E. Eby, D.O. was appointed the president of the new organization and dispatched to the AOA House of Delegates in Miami, Florida to plead California?s cause. Within an hour of Dr. Eby?s presentation, the delegates voted to charter a new society in California ? OPSC.

In 1968, eight osteopathic medical students applied for California licenses before the Board of Medical Examiners and were refused. The eight then applied to the Board of Osteopathic Examiners and were refused because this board had no authority to issue new licenses. As a result, the eight students led by Dr. Ted D?Amico filed suit charging that Proposition 22 didn?t affect D.O.?s licensed prior to 1962 and wrongfully deprived newer D.O.s of the right to practice medicine in California. Six years later, on March 19, 1974, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the provisions of Proposition 22 regarding merger and the inability of the BOE to issue licenses, unconstitutional.

By the end of 1974, 664 new licenses to practice osteopathic medicine in California had been granted. Since then, the osteopathic medical profession has steadily grown and developed throughout the state. In the past quarter century, OPSC has sponsored over 25 pieces of legislation to recognize and protect osteopathic physicians including state law making it illegal to discriminate against D.O.s in any professional or medical manner. OPSC has also prevented over 250 measures which would have seriously affected the way osteopathic physicians practice from becoming law."
 

musiclink213

My room is a mess
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2003
3,479
3
New York
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
a rose by any other name.....

whats the big deal about what letters you get? no matter what they learn, they wil still do the same duties and learn the same sttuff.
 
About the Ads

Amy B

I miss my son so much
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 7, 2000
4,303
3
Virginia
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
Originally posted by musiclink213
a rose by any other name.....

whats the big deal about what letters you get? no matter what they learn, they wil still do the same duties and learn the same sttuff.

That is the way I feel. I mean how many docs introduce themselves as ..."Hi I'm doctor Amy B , M.D., or Hi I'm doctor Amy B, D.O.?"

Let's face it patients don't know the difference and quite frankly don't care what follows your name as long as you are the best doctor you can be when treating them.
 

OnMyWayThere

OMS-III
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Apr 2, 2003
2,023
2
The best coast (west coast)
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by musiclink213
a rose by any other name.....

whats the big deal about what letters you get? no matter what they learn, they wil still do the same duties and learn the same sttuff.

rose = rose... rose does not = daisy

DO = DO

MD=MD

RN=RN

DO does not = MD does not = RN

If they have similar responsibilities, that doesn't make them the same. It is different from the start.
 

group_theory

EX-TER-MIN-ATE!'
Staff member
Administrator
Volunteer Staff
15+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2002
4,753
1,914
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Actually, the AMA in 1995/1996, invited the AOA (american osteopathic association) to pseudo-join the AMA by allowing the AOA to send voting delegates to the AMA House of Delegates. There were arguments within the DO community whether to accept the offer or not. Some feared that this was the latest attempt by the AMA to assimilate DOs. Here is an interesting article from Physician Weekly (published Dec 1996) detailing both sides of the debate.
http://www.physweekly.com/archive/96/12_23_96/pc.html


Btw, there are bigger issues that these two organizations (AOA and AMA) are currently dealing with - such as Medical Liability reform, Medicare funding and reimbursement, simplifying the complex billing codes, HMO audits, residency hours restriction, etc. - stuff that will affect us once we're out in practice.


Fun Fact: The first DO school, founded by Dr. A.T. Still, American School of Osteopathy (now KCOM) was given the ability to grant MD degree in its original charter by the state of Missouri. (although the school never gave anyone the MD degree, choosing instead to give out DOs because Dr. Still wanted osteopathic physicians to be unique, and not associated with the MDs at that time period (late 19th century) for obvious reason)
http://history.aoa-net.org/Education/educate.htm
 

musiclink213

My room is a mess
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2003
3,479
3
New York
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Originally posted by OnMyWayThere
rose = rose... rose does not = daisy

DO = DO

MD=MD

RN=RN

DO does not = MD does not = RN

If they have similar responsibilities, that doesn't make them the same. It is different from the start.

that wasn't the point i was trying to say. i meant that whatever you name you give to the DO's they're still doing the same thing.

and i can see this headed towards an MD vs. DO thread in the near future, so can we steer away from that?
 

bgreet

Dopefish Lives!
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2003
799
0
36
NY, NY
Status (Visible)
rose = rose... rose does not = daisy

DO = DO

MD=MD

RN=RN

DO does not = MD does not = RN

If they have similar responsibilities, that doesn't make them the same. It is different from the start.

No, but physician does = physician.
 

Adapt

2K Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 19, 2003
2,048
6
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by group_theory
Actually, the AMA in 1995/1996, invited the AOA (american osteopathic association) to pseudo-join the AMA by allowing the AOA to send voting delegates to the AMA House of Delegates. There were arguments within the DO community whether to accept the offer or not. Some feared that this was the latest attempt by the AMA to assimilate DOs. Here is an interesting article from Physician Weekly (published Dec 1996) detailing both sides of the debate.
http://www.physweekly.com/archive/96/12_23_96/pc.html


Btw, there are bigger issues that these two organizations (AOA and AMA) are currently dealing with - such as Medical Liability reform, Medicare funding and reimbursement, simplifying the complex billing codes, HMO audits, residency hours restriction, etc. - stuff that will affect us once we're out in practice.
So I read that article. I can't believe attitudes like Dr. Neer. His argument was to try to remain distinct when each year DOs are becoming more like MDs. I fully support Dr. Bradley's view and I think this view will be the prevailing view of DOs in years to come.

I'm curious though, has the AOA changed its decision and does it send delegates now to the AMA?
 

hossofadoc

Full Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 13, 2002
206
2
40
Status (Visible)
The AMA and AOA will never become one....DO will never change and why would we want too? How many people have actually looked up the history of why A.T. Still decided to use DO? I feel it would actually go agaisnt our forefathers to change.
 

gujuDoc

Full Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 21, 2004
13,864
38
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
  2. Resident [Any Field]
I do not believe that the title should change unless the philosophy of both equal the same.


Some people on this board seem to think they are one in the same, but that is not necessarily true as the DO philosophy is slightly different with its OMT practices etc.
 

cdreed

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 17, 2002
446
3
Omaha, NE
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
As a DO student that had the option of matriculating at allopathic institutions, I believe that our degree and title should remain as it is. Although the two professions exhibit many similarities, some differences do, indeed, exist. I am proud that I will earn the title of "Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine." IMO, those who want to alter it are just sidestepping their responsibility to educate the public and their patients about osteopathic philosophies and scope of care.
 

gioia

Full Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2003
556
0
TARDIS
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
Originally posted by bgreet
No, but physician does = physician.


Explain Chiropractic Physician, Oriental Medicine Physician, and Herbal Medicine Physician then.
 

gioia

Full Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2003
556
0
TARDIS
Status (Visible)
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
I am proud that I will earn the title of "Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine."

That is GREAT, me too! Then why isn't the degree called: DOM
(Doctor of Osteopathic medicine)

There actually is a name confusion of sorts:

DO (doctor of osteopathy) is the same title as DO (doctor of osteopathic medicine).

In Europe, there are practicing DO's but they are not licensed physicians, they are advanced degree physical therapists with extensive training in AT Still's principles.

In the US, a DO is a fully licensed physician, legally allowed to perscribe Rx...
 

OnMyWayThere

OMS-III
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Apr 2, 2003
2,023
2
The best coast (west coast)
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by cdreed
As a DO student that had the option of matriculating at allopathic institutions, I believe that our degree and title should remain as it is. Although the two professions exhibit many similarities, some differences do, indeed, exist. I am proud that I will earn the title of "Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine." IMO, those who want to alter it are just sidestepping their responsibility to educate the public and their patients about osteopathic philosophies and scope of care.

I agree 100% ...
 

DD214_DOC

Full Member
15+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2003
5,785
895
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
For the record, "doctor" and "physician" are not terms reserved only for DOs and MDs. DOs and MDs stole these "titles" from physicians in the past.

Galen, perhaps one of the greatest physicians to ever live, didn't even have a high school diploma. Yet, he was worthy of the title of "doctor" and "physician" because of his WORK not the type of degree he had.

The terms "Physician" and "Doctor" are just words the civilized world uses in place of "Healer" or "Shaman". Regardless of what type of degree or education you have or what type of philosophy or modalities you employ, anyone who works to cure the sick, heal the injured, or improve the health of another human are worthy of being called a doctor or physician.

From the Dictionary:

6 entries found for physician.
phy?si?cian
n.
A person licensed to practice medicine; a medical doctor.
A person who practices general medicine as distinct from surgery.
A person who heals or exerts a healing influence.

Notice the last line. Please stop being so narcissistic.
 

gujuDoc

Full Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 21, 2004
13,864
38
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
  2. Resident [Any Field]
This thread is cracking me up. I agree completely with CDreed.


As for the words DOM, that stands for Doctor of Oriental Medicine, so why start even more confusion??????
 

bgreet

Dopefish Lives!
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2003
799
0
36
NY, NY
Status (Visible)
Notice the last line. Please stop being so narcissistic.

:eek: I didn't believe I was really being narcissistic, just trying to make a point that amidst all of this "I want a name change", we seem to have lost the idea of what we are really trying to do here, help people. Who cares what the two letters are after your name, does it really change what you want to do for people?
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 17 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.