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Do people change a lot during 3rd year?

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projectlogic

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How did you or your classmates change? Just curious to see how being on the wards impacts most people.
 

LRAccord624

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We didn't change, but our topics of conversation sure did.

We don't have much else to talk about other than clinical stuff anymore.


I hope that attachment works... credit goes to armybound.
 

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cartoondoc

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I don't think people changed so much as we discovered what their true personality really was.
 

RySerr21

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I don't think people changed so much as we discovered what their true personality really was.


Bingo. I've been pretty surprised by the actions of some of my classmates.
 

Rollo

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I've become more impatient and less tolerant of BS both in my personal and professional life.

But like somebody said, I think the wards just brought out my true personality which consists of workaholic, Type A, detail oriented, and meticulous.

Somewhere in there, my idealistic "save a life" mentality is burning strongly though less intensely as it did before.

In the end though, I think the biggest revelation for me has been that people are still people...imperfect, arrogant, incompetent idiots...no matter if they are patients, nurses, attendings, janitors, students, etc.
 

coffeeeandtea

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I don't think people changed so much as we discovered what their true personality really was.

this. i don't think people "changed," i think it was more of "seeing another (read: annoying, douchey, etc.) side" of them. classmates who might have been cool in class and at outside social events can be totally different in a working environment.
 

OneTyme

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this. i don't think people "changed," i think it was more of "seeing another (read: annoying, douchey, etc.) side" of them. classmates who might have been cool in class and at outside social events can be totally different in a working environment.

Being cool doesn't equal being cool to work with....
 

Law2Doc

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How did you or your classmates change? Just curious to see how being on the wards impacts most people.

The wards will change you, but usually not while still a med student. It's a break from your traditional format of learning, but most people make the transition easily since you are still being coddled by multiple levels of superiors whose *****es are on the line and won't really let you screw up. Intern year when you are alone in the ICU overnight and a bunch of your patients try to die on you simultaneously is usually where the real personality transformation and development of new defense mechanisms and independence and an attitude occurs. You will still be you, but a battle hardened version of you.
 

sirenomelia

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The wards will change you, but usually not while still a med student. It's a break from your traditional format of learning, but most people make the transition easily since you are still being coddled by multiple levels of superiors whose *****es are on the line and won't really let you screw up. Intern year when you are alone in the ICU overnight and a bunch of your patients try to die on you simultaneously is usually where the real personality transformation and development of new defense mechanisms and independence and an attitude occurs. You will still be you, but a battle hardened version of you.

I got alot closer to people I rotated together with that before were just acquaintences. When you're in the trenches together it can bring out the best (and worst) in people.
 

MossPoh

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I think it changes you, but it is difficult for you to see. The people around you evolve too, so you have nothing relative to work off of. It is most likely a change in how we approach problems and interact with patients, whereas the multiple people dying is a more wide sweeping personality change. I've found myself much more confident and with a much more structured approach to problem solving than back in July.
 

bjb305

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it sure changed me.. WAAAAAAAAAAAY happier now than the first 2 years
 

arb011

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The wards will change you, but usually not while still a med student. It's a break from your traditional format of learning, but most people make the transition easily since you are still being coddled by multiple levels of superiors whose *****es are on the line and won't really let you screw up. Intern year when you are alone in the ICU overnight and a bunch of your patients try to die on you simultaneously is usually where the real personality transformation and development of new defense mechanisms and independence and an attitude occurs. You will still be you, but a battle hardened version of you.

Unfortunately, due to the new work hours restrictions, this may no longer be the case. And it's a shame because I really believe that the most growth and learning takes place when you are alone on the wards at night, with no one else to turn to but yourself.
 

RySerr21

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Can you expand on this? Maybe provide some examples?


Skipping out on lectures (signing your name as if you are there for the whole 4 hours then going home), skipping out on days they are supposed to be on call (now the other student who was on call with you gets f'd), throwing people under the bus in front of residents/attendings, fighting with other students over patients, 'stealing' other student's patients, kissing major ass (e.g. cleaning the attending's office, going to target to buy a door stop), doing anything necessary to do as little work as possible.

Not everyone does this, in fact most people don't. But it does happen, and my point is that you may be surprised at which people you find doing it.
 

Alvarez13

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Skipping out on lectures (signing your name as if you are there for the whole 4 hours then going home), skipping out on days they are supposed to be on call (now the other student who was on call with you gets f'd), throwing people under the bus in front of residents/attendings, fighting with other students over patients, 'stealing' other student's patients, kissing major ass (e.g. cleaning the attending's office, going to target to buy a door stop), doing anything necessary to do as little work as possible.

Not everyone does this, in fact most people don't. But it does happen, and my point is that you may be surprised at which people you find doing it.
Yah, I forsee the brown-nosing becoming a major annoyance. I'll post again in come June.
 

Law2Doc

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Unfortunately, due to the new work hours restrictions, this may no longer be the case. And it's a shame because I really believe that the most growth and learning takes place when you are alone on the wards at night, with no one else to turn to but yourself.

6 days a week of 13 hour night float shifts probably gives an intern enough battle training and seasoning and fits within the current restrictions. Don't you worry, programs will find a way to wring out every little drop of man hours under the current rules. If not, they just shift the pain to the PGY2 year.
 

LossForWords

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The more frat-tastic and get-drunk-every-Friday-and-Saturday-night crowd seem to grow up a little bit. Not a whole lot, but more.

For some of the people in my class, it seems like it's finally their first job that they HAVE to show up for and not just sleep through and "get the notes later".
 
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