mbadoc

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Does the average Harvard Medical school, or Wash U., or Johns Hopkins medical school graduate make more than a Tufts/NYU/Geoge Washington graduate? In business and law, I think there is a definite correlation between what tier school you attend and your future earning potential. For medicine, i think it is a little different. The Harvard's, Wash U.'s and Johns Hopkin's may produce more specialist in lucrative areas, but don't these schools also produce more of those who pursue academic medicine where pay is much less? I would say that schools just below the top ten or fifteen actually end up making more, if you were to compare the class averages, because more end up as specialists in private practice compared to those at the very top who many tend to end up as researchers or professors.
 

Law2Doc

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mbadoc said:
Does the average Harvard Medical school, or Wash U., or Johns Hopkins medical school graduate make more than a Tufts/NYU/Geoge Washington graduate? In business and law, I think there is a definite correlation between what tier school you attend and your future earning potential. For medicine, i think it is a little different. The Harvard's, Wash U.'s and Johns Hopkin's may produce more specialist in lucrative areas, but don't these schools also produce more of those who pursue academic medicine where pay is much less? I would say that schools just below the top ten or fifteen actually end up making more, if you were to compare the class averages, because more end up as specialists in private practice compared to those at the very top who many tend to end up as researchers or professors.
Yes, the top programs produce more people who go into academic medicine. But I don't get your point -- the people who go into academic medicine do so by choice and certainly had many other and more lucrative options (probably many more so than those of the next tier of schools), so I wouldn't pick the next tier just because their stats suggest they make more. Thus using salaries netted by graduates is a flawed way to pick a school, unless you exclude those who go into academics and break out those who go into particular specialties and private practice settings and just compare those.
 

Orth2006

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mbadoc said:
Does the average Harvard Medical school, or Wash U., or Johns Hopkins medical school graduate make more than a Tufts/NYU/Geoge Washington graduate? In business and law, I think there is a definite correlation between what tier school you attend and your future earning potential. For medicine, i think it is a little different. The Harvard's, Wash U.'s and Johns Hopkin's may produce more specialist in lucrative areas, but don't these schools also produce more of those who pursue academic medicine where pay is much less? I would say that schools just below the top ten or fifteen actually end up making more, if you were to compare the class averages, because more end up as specialists in private practice compared to those at the very top who many tend to end up as researchers or professors.
I think there is a study about Physician earning potential somewhere on AAMC website. Not sure where. But it didnt really say anything about the particular med school you go to. Mostly it was just that the career of medicine is still a good investment. It made a few comparisions to Law but that was it. If I find the page i'll post the link.
 

MousseKnuckle

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Medicare and the insurance companies compensate the same no matter whether you graduated from Harvard or CMS/FINCH/RFU.

However, harvard grads can probably get into elite rads/derm/urology/cardiololgy residencies/fellowships more easily, and if they choose to stay out of academic medicine, they can make a ton of money, while those fields are more difficult for grads of bottom of the barrel schools to get into, though anything is possible.
 

Orth2006

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Orth2006 said:
I think there is a study about Physician earning potential somewhere on AAMC website. Not sure where. But it didnt really say anything about the particular med school you go to. Mostly it was just that the career of medicine is still a good investment. It made a few comparisions to Law but that was it. If I find the page i'll post the link.

Ok here it is. Its actually a study about Physician Indebtedness. But in it contains some info about compensation

https://services.aamc.org/Publications/showfile.cfm?file=version21.pdf&prd_id=102&prv_id=113&pdf_id=21
 

DrBowtie

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A lot of income is based on specialty, location, and personal practice management.
Whether rankings help you get into a specialty in a prime location is debatable.
That said, smart investments will be the best source of income.
 

CTSballer11

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Most money made in medicine is made in the midwest and the south or areas with a low concentration of physicians. Usually big name schools are in cities with a high concentration of physicians. So if you are interested in making a lot of money your best bet is to set up shop in one of the above mentioned areas. Doctors from state schools bill as much as doctors from top schools, unless of course you do not accept insurance. For the most part once you finish your training there should be plenty of jobs to choose from, the pay and benefits are probably better in areas that are not as popular as NY, San Diego etc. A big name school should help if you want to be chief of surgery at (insert academic institution here), but in private practice, how much you are willing to work and your business skills is what brings in business.
 

IgweEmeka

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I think it has a lot to do with the hospitals in which you do your rotations and in which your school is affiliated with.
Harvard, Johns Hopkins and Wash U all have great hospitals in which their students do their rotations in...therefore they have been able to work along side the best physicians in their fields and possibly have gotten letters of rec from such and thus have matched into great residencies.
An example is the U of Chicago Pritzker student matchlist. The students said they do not have a great USMLE average score, but the fact that they do their rotations in one of america's best hospitals in many fields makes them very competitive for residencies. More so for residencies in cancer, cardiology, radiology and internal medicine and this is reflected in their great matchlists....
Maybe you should ask the allo room more on this....
 

MousseKnuckle

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ctwickman said:
To the original question: The short and correct answer is NO.
Like I said, medicare compensates the same no matter where you lived or graduated from. But going to a top university makes it easier to be average in your class and still match in an elite residency in the elite and most desirable urban cities (NY, SF, LA).

I'm sorry but the number 20 student at medical college of wisco is not going to be able to match in plastics/derm in LA, but the #20 student from Stanford might be able to. If you can match in derm/plastics in LA, you are set for life!
 

Shredder

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mbadoc said:
Does the average Harvard Medical school, or Wash U., or Johns Hopkins medical school graduate make more than a Tufts/NYU/Geoge Washington graduate? In business and law, I think there is a definite correlation between what tier school you attend and your future earning potential. For medicine, i think it is a little different. The Harvard's, Wash U.'s and Johns Hopkin's may produce more specialist in lucrative areas, but don't these schools also produce more of those who pursue academic medicine where pay is much less? I would say that schools just below the top ten or fifteen actually end up making more, if you were to compare the class averages, because more end up as specialists in private practice compared to those at the very top who many tend to end up as researchers or professors.
the thread asks a pretty good question and sure enough i noticed its asked by fellow mdmba aspirant--good work! hmm...is this worthy of conducting a study? or maybe there are already stats, not sure, i should read the thread at least. ok done--i would be really interested to see a ranking of schools based on median earnings after graduation, the way business schools do it. thats the REAL way to prioritize schools :smuggrin:
gogo110182 said:
give me a break...... does that even matter??
:laugh: typical