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DO with OMT vs MD with OMT

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by jubei0766, Oct 28, 2001.

  1. jubei0766

    jubei0766 Member
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    Would it be reasonable for a MD to get an OMT training? If a patient is looking for a physician with OMT background, which type of physician would the patient prefer? DO or MD (assuming that they both have OMT background)? I know that these are very open-ended and subjective question. Please share your experiences and thoughts....thank you!
     
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  3. Katie1822

    Katie1822 Senior Member
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    An MD can't really get training in osteopathic manipulative medicine. Physcians that specialize in OMT usually have gone through an OMM residency and that is only open to DO's. My OMM prof has given some seminars on OMT to MDs but they are not nearly as comprehensive as the training as a DO student recieves. If I'm not mistaken, MSU-COM does offer courses in OMT for allopaths but I think in the end, only DO's can bill for that type of treatment. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  4. Freeeedom!

    Freeeedom! Senior Member
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    MD's can't bill for something described as "Osteopathic", but since much of the rehab techniques used have dual names (Muscle Energy is used in Physical Therapy also, and also goes by a similiar name PNF), myofascial release has been advanced by PT's for years and Manipulation is manipulation. Much of it can be billed under "Therapuetic Exercise or Manual Therapy or Soft Tissue Massage" but not specifically "OMT".


    That should answer your question.
     
  5. John DO

    John DO A.T. Still Endowed Chair
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    Since most DO schools integrate the OMM training into the curriculum, an MD cannot possibly learn as much in a few seminars. However, many MDs do become proficient in the use of OMM and some even teach it at Osteopathic schools. I think of them as generic Osteopaths. Remeber, though, that to merely use the Osteopathic techniques makes you a technician; to think Osteopathically makes you a DO.
     
  6. swdave

    swdave Senior Member
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    I'm posting under another name because SWDAVE forgot to logout in our computer lab. To clean up information about MSUCOM offering OMM classes to our allopathic colleagues at our school, this is partially true. Our MD friends may take a lunchtime seminar with the D.O. students that focuses on some OMM techniques for specific problems ie. carpal tunnel syndrome. Like others have mentioned though, our MD counterparts are not eligible to take our full OMM curriculum, despite their desire to.

    I try to help my MD friends learn a few techniques here and there, like muscle energy, range of motion testing, and soft tissue techniques. Yet, without the weekly practice and discussions about musculoskeletal biomechanics our MD colleagues will be forever limited until, perhaps, allopathic schools change their curriculum to incorporate manual medicine and biomechanics. For the sake of improving medicine, hopefully MD schools will consider this possibility. One last subjective comment...it is unfortunate that many of our MD colleagues will not get the extensive musculoskeletal training that those in D.O. schools have the opportunity to learn. Consequently, many MDs will have to refer their patients with musculoskeletal complaints to PTs. Additionally, the power of touch, using OMM, contributes much to the doctor patient relationship; facilitating trust and a feeling of care.

    sincerely,

    Docflanny
    MS-2 MSUCOM
     
  7. Freeeedom!

    Freeeedom! Senior Member
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    I agree with most of what you said, but let me assure you, PT's recieve much better biomechanics and rehab courses than DO's do. I know this because I am both.

    But, DO's get soo much more, so as a managing entity, the physician (DO) has a much greater knowledge of the entire picture.
     

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