do you get smarter in med school?...

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specialflava

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Hey everyone, I'm actually an undergrad right now, just had a question for some of you further along in the process. Right now I'm nearing the home stretch of the finals season (one more to go), and after a week straight of 10 hour study days punctuated by various finals I feel mentally/physically ill at the thought of more studying. Granted I brought it upon myself by waiting until the last minute to catch up with everything, I still feel like I've been run over by a truck. I can't imagine doing this for more than short bursts at a time (i.e cramming right before finals, then having a month off), but I've heard that med school shoves 100x more info down your throat than undergrad, which could make EVERY week a study week. My question is, do you guys feel like you got smarter or more efficient at studying once med school came around, or is every day filled with massive amounts of studying? I could imagine some serious depression setting in if every week were like finals week...

Anyways, I'd appreciate any input!
 

braluk

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i dont think you get smarter in med school. You just learn how to really manage your time, and learn about your study habits and dealing with stress. As for getting smarter, thats another story- your analytical skill and overall ability to retain information may be enhanced after graduating, but I think that the bulk of our intelligence is something that develops when we're young, and only gets refined over time.
 
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deleted77919

Get smarter? I doubt it (at least, it doesn't have any impact on amount of time spent studying). You just adjust to the fact that study and class consumes most of everyday (yes, including weekends) and take every moment you can take a quick breather as a gift.
 

medicomel

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Hey everyone, I'm actually an undergrad right now, just had a question for some of you further along in the process. Right now I'm nearing the home stretch of the finals season (one more to go), and after a week straight of 10 hour study days punctuated by various finals I feel mentally/physically ill at the thought of more studying. Granted I brought it upon myself by waiting until the last minute to catch up with everything, I still feel like I've been run over by a truck. I can't imagine doing this for more than short bursts at a time (i.e cramming right before finals, then having a month off), but I've heard that med school shoves 100x more info down your throat than undergrad, which could make EVERY week a study week. My question is, do you guys feel like you got smarter or more efficient at studying once med school came around, or is every day filled with massive amounts of studying? I could imagine some serious depression setting in if every week were like finals week...

Anyways, I'd appreciate any input!

that IS the reality of it. i consider myself a loser if i don't study at least 6-8 hrs/day, and that doesn't include going to class. this past finals week it was 14-hr days. and this past weekend... well, let's just say it's midnight and i'm still up.

welcome to our world.
 

Dr. McDreamy

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i actually feel a lot dumber....but i am a more efficient studier now.
 

PoorMD

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undergrad is a different world, a happy place, with a week off here and there when no exams are coming up.. trips to the bar were fairly routine in undergrad, like once a week or two... and yes undergrad is stressful as all hell, especially if you are in a hard major like pre meds are.. especially if you are not accepted yet...

You definately become a better accountant of time, your time is everything. You might get better at memorizing things rapidly. But overall, you don't get any smarter. Just more knowledge in your problem solving repetoir.
 

stoic

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med school has undoubtly made me dumber at everything except med school.
 
W

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med school has undoubtly made me dumber at everything except med school.

Trudat. I may know more facts, but I don't feel any more intelligent. Greater emphasis on rote memory and less on application at this point in my studies, but I'll get back to you in a few semesters.
 

Law2Doc

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you get used to it - if you don't . . .

Agree -- incessant studying in med school is more of a survival instinct than anything else. Things move way too quickly to cram, and you don't want to be spending your "last free summer" retaking a first year course.
Plus as others have said, everyone else you will know in school is studying, and if they all jumped off a bridge you probably would too.:laugh:
 

AmoryBlaine

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Also keep in mind that you don't neccesarily have to do "A" level work in the first two years of med school. You can pass all of your classes w/o killing yourself, still do better than average on boards if you work hard for a month, and still get that spot in anesthesiology.
 

shivasHeroLike

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you become smart at time management, which helps to maximize volumes of information uptake.
 
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Medikit

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I'm pretty sure I'm a bit dumber than I was by the time I ended undergrad, but if you give me a clinical scenario and five options I am much better than I used to be at narrowing it down to only two options.
 

FenderHM

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its the second one OP, where every week is a study week. sure, some weeks are lighter than others, but you def cant just wait til right before exams or you WILL get rocked, and by get rocked I don't mean like below the mean, I mean like fail
 

Blake

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Can't say it changed anything, other than I know a thing or two about diseases now.
 

psipsina

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I think I am definitely a more efficient studier, but that only means that I get to take it pretty easy right after the test. We test on monday and tuesday, and I usually don't start studying again until the next monday. Granted I plan for the next semester, take care of things like cleaning and laundry etc that I've been ignoring and sleep a whole lot in this time. Then I start off at studying 3-4 hours on class days and about 8 hours on weekends, by the time I am three weeks out from a test I am studying 6 hours on class days and about 13 hours on weekend days. I always sleep at least 6 hours and I take a break every day with my hubby and do something lazy like watch TV. But there is no cramming in the last weeky style of things like there was in undergrad. If you do this you fail.
 
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78222

I think I just pushed all the useful facts out of my brain to make room for useless factoids. I don't remember 3rd grade anymore.
 

MJB

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i dont think you get smarter in med school. You just learn how to really manage your time, and learn about your study habits and dealing with stress. As for getting smarter, thats another story- your analytical skill and overall ability to retain information may be enhanced after graduating, but I think that the bulk of our intelligence is something that develops when we're young, and only gets refined over time.


Your sig line just made me feel very, very, very old.
 

Sophie

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I'm pretty sure I'm a bit dumber than I was by the time I ended undergrad, but if you give me a clinical scenario and five options I am much better than I used to be at narrowing it down to only two options.

:laugh: I just had my path final today, and it was almost all exactly like that (except 6 options - evil teacher).

I don't know if it's because I never really tried rote memorization in undergrad (I was a concepts person), but I feel like my ability to memorize has greatly increased since the beginning of this year. My social skills, however, are atrophying, I didn't step foot outside of my house from last Thursday until this morning, and my biggest exercise activity lately is walking downstairs for food. Granted this is finals week, so it's not usually this bad, but every normal day is still along the lines of: get up, go to class, come home, study, hang out with roommates/watch TV for an hour, go to sleep.
 

Skelfie

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I haven't started med school yet so I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but I know that going to graduate school helped my memory tremendously. I used to have one-on-one seminars with a professor who expected me to know a new set of monographs every week and be able to answer multi-tiered questions on any part of the material, ugh. So, it follows that -- since my memory got better out of necessity for that situation -- I would think that med school would also help with memory because of the necessity of absorbing so much at once...

That said, I am wondering if anyone has any tips for improving one's visual memory? I think mine is okay, but parts of the "pictures" get fuzzy (especially the words on the diagrams in my brain). I know it's not useful for much, but it does seem helpful with biochem and other subjects that involve knowing lots of pathways.
 

Sophie

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That said, I am wondering if anyone has any tips for improving one's visual memory? I think mine is okay, but parts of the "pictures" get fuzzy (especially the words on the diagrams in my brain). I know it's not useful for much, but it does seem helpful with biochem and other subjects that involve knowing lots of pathways.

Unfortunately I don't have any tips, but as far as visual memory not being useful for much - I use it for almost everything! Charts of bacteria: gram +/-, location, disease caused, mode of transmission; charts of pharmacology: mechanism of action, used for, side effects; gross anatomy: picture each area of the body, organs, blood vessels, relationships; etc. So don't sell visual memory short... it will come in very handy in med school. :)
 
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vtucci

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No, medical school makes most students dumber. It cuts us off from the world so any associations you may have with literature, music, culture, in short anything other than basic sciences, you can kiss it goodbye.

Cramming is not workable for most people. There is about 1000x the information on a med school exam as there is on a typical undergrad exam.

The best thing you can do for yourself is find a good group of friends in medical school. You will need the support and they will need it from you.
 

t33sg1rl

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I got a lot dumber. In undergrad I learned concepts, rarely studied except for exam weeks. Med school doesn't have a lot of concepts and many of the facts you learn aren't tied to anything and are not intuitive-it's like memorizing an epic poem vs memorizing the phone book.
Anyway on to the dumbness-this report comes from my friends and family, who feel that my attention span has decreased, my common sense has gone out the window, and my memory apparently deleted other people's birthdays, anniversaries, or telephone numbers in order to make room for medical factoids.

But... I get better grades with fewer hours invested as an MS2 than I did the first semester of med school, so I feel my efficiency is much better.
 

Luba Licious

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I'm pretty sure I'm a bit dumber than I was by the time I ended undergrad, but if you give me a clinical scenario and five options I am much better than I used to be at narrowing it down to only two options.

In my case, narrowing it down to two and then picking the wrong one, but having a damn good argument for it. :laugh:
 

med_heidelberg

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definitely makes you dumber, especially if you were doing something more intellectually stimulating before, like grad school.
 

bat28

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You just learn to think and study differently. By the first set of exams (hopefully) you figure out what works and what doesn't.

I doubt that you get any smarter, just better at categorizing and associating lists of facts.
 

Tiger26

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Yeah, I think I forgot how to spell (and I'm the guy who practically never got a word wrong from k1-12). Of course, last week I could have told you every metabolic enzyme and it's location on the page of one of my 50-60 pages of review sheets. Now after a solid 72 hours of drunkenness, I only know the major concepts:

1)Biochem: Umm. . . . make sure not to eat a lot of sugar if you've got diabetes.

2)Anatomy: Pretty solid on abduction/adduction and nerves for forearm movement (Knew Netter back and forth at one point)

3)Human Development: Well, when a mommy and daddy really love each other, really bad stuff can happen from weeks 0-8 and less bad stuff after that. Oh yeah, they should also take folic acid.
 

MystikBliss

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EVERY WEEK IS FINALS WEEK!!!!! and if you don't treat it like it is then you will surely be taking your first year over (which is not only embarrassing, but guess what, you have to pay that $40 -60K for FIVE years now).

If you feel like that would be depressing to you...let me tell you it is. I have struggled for the last 4 1/2 months with that. 22 y.o. and all I do is sit in a library and look at crap that doctors tell me I will NEVER use (meanwhile Paris Hilton is in the club every night and manages to have the time of her life). I'm the kind of person that likes to go out and do stuff, live life, and study when it's time...all that stopped this august. I've been so depressed I lost 12 pounds in 2 months.

There's nothing hard about the material in med school. Half the stuff is crap you study in undergrad (if you were a bio major). It's the volume. It keeps coming and coming and coming. And you have to study very specific, stupid details. You will spend at least 10 hours a day studying, no matter what your MCAT score was.

There's no such thing as studying more efficiently. If you weren't an efficient studier, you wouldn't have gotten into med school. You only spend more time studying.

I'm not saying don't go to med school, but you definitely need to talk to med students before you go so you won't be in for a rude awakening (like I was!):cool:
 

smq123

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Granted I brought it upon myself by waiting until the last minute to catch up with everything, I still feel like I've been run over by a truck. I can't imagine doing this for more than short bursts at a time (i.e cramming right before finals, then having a month off), but I've heard that med school shoves 100x more info down your throat than undergrad, which could make EVERY week a study week. My question is, do you guys feel like you got smarter or more efficient at studying once med school came around, or is every day filled with massive amounts of studying? I could imagine some serious depression setting in if every week were like finals week...

Anyways, I'd appreciate any input!

In med school, the "intense study time: down time" ratio reverses. In undergrad, you cram for a few days, and then can take a couple of weeks "off." In med school, you cram for a few weeks, then take a couple of days off. You get better at recovering faster - kind of like trained athletes.

If you do go to med school, don't cram. Really. It's the easiest way to become suicidal, because not only will you be kicking yourself for not studying earlier, trying to cram that much information into your brain will physically hurt.
 
D

deleted109597

I became smarter. And I haven't even finished school yet.

First, I have learned a fair amount of what was forced upon me. Maybe not even half, but still, that's a lot of stuff. I know more than enough to make my parents have headaches when I talk about stuff.
Second, I learned how to deal with complete dickheads. I also learned how to deal with some bad patients.
Third, I learned that the Match is a huge pain.
 
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Hurricane95

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Nah...you certainly don't get smarter, you just adapt to the added stress like a deer in constant "fight or flight mode." At my school tests are roughly every two to three weeks, usually on mondays...so while you're not constantly in "finals week" mode, it never really tones down. There's no way in hell you can ever allow yourself to fall behind, or you will never come back in time for the exam. So you're always reviewing the lectures for the day, the ones for the day before, etc, during the week AND during the weekends. The weekend right before an exam is completely dedicated to studying. Don't expect to go out or see sunshine that weekend.

Now that I think about it the only REAL time off is on exam day, right after the exam....before starting the next module. That, and winter break, which I am thanking God for...these three weeks are certainly a heavenly gift :D

Even though I have this lingering feeling like I should be starting my Step 1 studying... :eek:
 

sammy09

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med school has undoubtly made me dumber at everything except med school.

Ha Ha. I am Sooooooooooo much dumber now. It's embarassing. The right side of my brain has taken the hardest hit. Sometimes I can't form intelligent sentences because I simply can't recall the vocabulary. There are moments in time that slow down to 1/2 speed and in those moments I think to myself, "is this what it feels like when Alzheimer's hits?" Because I am totally AWARE of the fact that 3 years ago, I could have spoken about this thing at hand coherently. With nuance. And wit. And double entendre. Like anything else in life though, the skill suffers with lack of practice. I mean. . . in general, I don't have to SPEAK intelligently. To ANYONE. I just have to study. And regurgitate. And speak to the people I see every day with a 3rd grade vocab and they do the same with me. I don't have time to read books. More practice lost. More vocab down the toilet.

I see little kids in the hospital and their ability to articulate themselves completely freaks me out.

I start replacing words like "indicative" with "symptomatic." And yes, I just put 'symptomatic' into my thesaurus to see what words I should be using instead. I know they exist. When I was 10, I knew how to use the word indicative.

But now I know what guaiac means. :scared:
 

Non-TradTulsa

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My question is, do you guys feel like you got smarter or more efficient at studying once med school came around, or is every day filled with massive amounts of studying? I could imagine some serious depression setting in if every week were like finals week...
Prepare to be depressed, my friend (you might even throw in some chills, cold sweats, and major-league panic attacks). That's why 2/3 of the class, including me, needed SSRIs to get through the first semester.

Seriously, though - smarter? I doubt it. You probably get better at picking up key facts out of what you're reading. Material in medical school is rarely terribly difficult - it's just that the volume of material is absolutely overwhelming. Every week in medical school is going to be like the finals weeks you have now - I do know a few people who don't study for a week or ten days after test block, but that would be way too much stress for me. I've always been a procrastinator, and that just doesn't fly in med school. I work pretty much every day, including weekends - I try to take a Friday night off sometimes for my mental health - but you have to keep up on a daily basis, and it's very much like undergrad finals every week. During "pre-block" week, you're going to find yourself making tough decisions like "do I know enough to get six hours of sleep or do I study for two more hours and get by on four hours sleep?"

Don't mean to be a downer, but (as I'm often told) - if medical school were easy, a lot more people would be doing it. It's a big lifestyle change from undergrad. You do tend to lose contact with the "real" world - I watch CNN for about 20 minutes in the morning while I'm dressing and maybe for 15 minutes when I climb into bed, and that's my only contact with the non-medical world (except for the weekend after test block, when you try to cram two weeks' worth of normal living into two days).
 

Hurricane95

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Ha, true...and also making judgments like: If I stay up those extra two hours, am I awake enough to actually retain any of the reading for later? Or will it be two hours wasted?

Seriously sometimes I felt like I was standing there in anatomy lab nodding off...like cutting through soft dead flesh in a dream rather than reality. How lovely.
 

lullaby

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I think med school inhance learning skills and improve the intilligence that you already have ....:idea:

caio
 

Azawakh

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I feel smarter in medical school but I don't believe I am in fact any smarter.
All my memorization skills that I have been grooming for the past 25 years have blossomed and I am excelling where undergrad for me was challenging.
 

mikedc813

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You definitely don't get any smarter in med school. You learn how to study more efficiently, that's all. You use whatever brains you started with and simply add to your memory banks. There's no getting smarter in med school - all you're doing is spending hours upon hours studying anyways. That won't make you smarter, just more knowledgable.
 

ashahdc

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i actually feel a lot dumber....but i am a more efficient studier now.

Agreed. Better at time management. I can memorize larger amounts of info, and study more efficiently. But smarter??? No
 

AggieJohn

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I am entering in fall '07 and I feel worried that I will lose touch with American society. Some may argue that's a good thing, but I would hate to be around my family & friends and not have any idea of the tv show or new song or book they are talking about. Will I have time to follow politics and world events?
 

stoic

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I am entering in fall '07 and I feel worried that I will lose touch with American society. Some may argue that's a good thing, but I would hate to be around my family & friends and not have any idea of the tv show or new song or book they are talking about. Will I have time to follow politics and world events?

there's time to do most of the things you might want to do if you want to make time for them.

i've found that losing the drive to apply yourself elsewhere is more of a problem.
 

psipsina

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I am entering in fall '07 and I feel worried that I will lose touch with American society. Some may argue that's a good thing, but I would hate to be around my family & friends and not have any idea of the tv show or new song or book they are talking about. Will I have time to follow politics and world events?

I read everyday on study breaks and before bed when I'm too fried to retain things but too amped to fall asleep. I read novels for fun and I get a Time magazine subscription that I generally keep up with so I know whatsup with the world out there. I also check NYtimes.com and cnn.com when I'm boerd in class. Everynight I have an hour dinner break and I watch a tv show, or part of a dvd or play some video games to give my life a semblance of normalacy. So far I am high passing too, so I'm not even a p=md type of student. I think if you push yourself too hard and stop doing everything you enjoy you'll go crazy which will hurt your grades so its just not worth it.
 

anon-y-mouse

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EVERY WEEK IS FINALS WEEK!!!!! and if you don't treat it like it is then you will surely be taking your first year over (which is not only embarrassing, but guess what, you have to pay that $40 -60K for FIVE years now).

If you feel like that would be depressing to you...let me tell you it is. I have struggled for the last 4 1/2 months with that. 22 y.o. and all I do is sit in a library and look at crap that doctors tell me I will NEVER use (meanwhile Paris Hilton is in the club every night and manages to have the time of her life). I'm the kind of person that likes to go out and do stuff, live life, and study when it's time...all that stopped this august. I've been so depressed I lost 12 pounds in 2 months.

There's nothing hard about the material in med school. Half the stuff is crap you study in undergrad (if you were a bio major). It's the volume. It keeps coming and coming and coming. And you have to study very specific, stupid details. You will spend at least 10 hours a day studying, no matter what your MCAT score was.

There's no such thing as studying more efficiently. If you weren't an efficient studier, you wouldn't have gotten into med school. You only spend more time studying.

I'm not saying don't go to med school, but you definitely need to talk to med students before you go so you won't be in for a rude awakening (like I was!):cool:

This is exactly what medical school is like. For me at least. And I'm not entirely sure what the class of 2011 posters are adding to this conversation, as they haven't even started yet. It's really easy to fail a class or exam, if you aren't paying attention-- I haven't, but I've seen this happen. I know a lot about weird (and even common) medical conditions, but I've largely become dumber in my outside world interactions.
 

TexasFool

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i don´t know what you guys are complaining about but MS0 is easy.
 

Non-TradTulsa

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I am entering in fall '07 and I feel worried that I will lose touch with American society. Some may argue that's a good thing, but I would hate to be around my family & friends and not have any idea of the tv show or new song or book they are talking about. Will I have time to follow politics and world events?
Umm... I feel bad now, after reading this. I tried to make an honest post, but maybe it was too much of a downer. I do have strong feeling, though, about sugar-coating orientation for new students. Medical school is very tough. For me, first semester was a horrendous adjustment. As a friend of mine says, it's a kick in the teeth, no matter how good a student you are (only he didn't say "teeth" - he went further south :laugh: ).

Anyway, AggieJohn, it's medical school, not prison. Unless it's block week or late in pre-block week, I take time every day before I start studying to glance at The New York Times, The Washington Post, The LA Times, and my hometown Tulsa World on-line before I start studying. I do know what's going on in the real world. I also make time a couple of times a week to write and answer personal e-mails. For most studying, I have classical music on the stereo turned-down very low but for light material that's written in readable English (like Human Behavior) I do listen to contemporary music.

Don't worry too much about feeling dumb around family and friends, because you won't be around family and friends that much (!!!). I must admit I have a tendency to divide my world into "medical students" and "normal people". Normal people include family and pre-medical-school friends. They won't understand what you're going through, no matter how hard you try to explain. I've had to forcefully tell friends who were visiting OKC from Tulsa that they could not stop by my house - and it's created some hurt feelings. The dialog goes like this: "Oh, come on now, surely you can take an hour and a half to go and have dinner with me." "No, I honestly can't, my exams are less than 10 days away and I just can't take the time."

The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine - Class of 2010
 

JohnnyOU

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Don't worry too much about feeling dumb around family and friends, because you won't be around family and friends that much (!!!).
Oh man...I almost busted a gut laughing when I read that line :D
He's correct as usual.

To the OP.....
IMO you will be able to keep up with world events. I hit Drudgereport.com or CNN.com about every day just to get the headlines....that's usually all I care about and rarely read whole articles.

As for movies, I don't think I've seen one since med school...and I never watch TV except when I'm eating...which kinda stinks cuz I don't get to watch Scrubs, House, Everybody Loves Raymond, etc...

Honestly, your life will change a lot. Much of your old habits have to be replaced. But we sorta new this going in.

Good luck.
 

ellieamee

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In my case, narrowing it down to two and then picking the wrong one, but having a damn good argument for it. :laugh:

Yes, here, here! I was just thinking about the same thing...I did a year and a half of law school (intending to practice medical law; that was my pathetic attempt to avoid eight years of school and somehow get the same result...) and I thought, "I'm just trying to adjust not being allowed to explain why I picked an answer as the answer. Having to pick one, knowing it might be wrong, without the opportunity to justify my selection is driving me crazy." It initially drove my med school/first year's staff nearly crazy as well, because I would stay after class or take up their office hours trying to explain why my wrong answer would be the right answer if they only looked at it from the perspective I was when I chose said answer. I quickly learned the difference between intelligence and attempted manipulation and was taught(reminded) swiftly that I was in med school, not undergrad, not law school, and no one cared, nor even owed me someone caring, about why I thought what I thought. If I got it right, I got credit. Got it wrong, points deducted. I was not, still am not, important--no, educated and experienced--enough to be allowed the luxury of an opinion, especially one that might change a medical answer or fact--practiced doctors/surgeons/teachers were allowed that privilege, as I would/will be too years down the road after I have proven myself deserving of it. However, I sure tried!!

My question to who originally started this thread: have you been accepted to med school yet or are you still applying? If you are wrapping up your last semester of undergrad and are presently accepted for next year's incoming med school class, then I hesitate to remark on your study habits because your method--which initially makes me want to suggest an alternative to the: for the most part procrastinating, studying up to an exploding point, taking the exam, crashing, and burning only to work up to it again within a few months and/or weeks (whichever the case may be)--has gotten you this far and it takes someone very good, at whatever method they are using, to obtain the grades that got them into med school, and I would hesitate in recommending a change in that case. If you are already in, decide this question's solution for yourself based on what you experience upon actually entering med school. If, however, you have not yet been informed of an acceptance, and you're not sure yet whether your cram, cram, crash method has worked effectively enough to provide your furthering of your goals (in this case, obviously,med school), I would say to you that if this (method of studying/"learning") is causing you a struggle in undergrad, then it will most definitely inhibit your academics in med school.

No, in my opinion (and I emphasize it is only that), one does not get "smarter," per se, in med school, but you do learn (hopefully) a great deal more than in undergrad. That is, you are exposed to and given a great deal more information to process, and it is not possible to both receive (i.e., read, or be lectured on) that information and to then process and thoroughly understand it, by putting it off and then trying to get it all "just in time" for an exam. For example, you wouldn't want (and such would never be allowed) your surgeon approaching your table, all set to begin, after simply three or four all-nighters of studying the steps to your impending surgery.

Now, if you are able to receive and process any given amount of information the way you currently do, then this clearly works for you--but if it worked for you (without causing your stated worry about med school and your undergrad stress and exhaustion), you wouldn't have worried online to this forum about using said method in your upcoming med school career. If medical school/becoming a doctor is sincerely what you want, then you should prepare to, each day, thoroughly digest and learn the information you have been given to learn that day. If cramming at the last minute was even slightly difficult for you in undergrad, it will be impossible in med school. And even if you could accomplish the good grades by cramming and pulling up weeks/months of information all at one time in the exam time span of merely a few hours, you would need to ask yourself whether you actually learned the material or simply worked out a way to recite it once, on demand. If the way you prepared for given exam does not leave you capable of recovering the information mentally later, then you have lost information a future patient will have needed; you have also lost information you, as an aspiring doctor, will have needed to even pass the boards. This method, if it only works in the short term for you, is not the method for you. It will ultimately fail your patients; more despairingly, it will cause you to ultimately fail you. As I previously stated, unless you truly learn the material your described way and learn it in a way that doesn't exhaust, stress or overwhelm you, then: learn it the way most of us do and face that that will take hours a day of studying, and a true sacrifice, of many years, to your future trade. If it is truly what you want completely, then the sacrifice will ultimately be more than worth it. I'm not even a doctor yet and I can promise you that.

On a positive note, though, remember it is not, even nearly, an impossible feat to become a doctor. It is a feat not all human beings can accomplish, but graduating from college is also a feat not all human beings can accomplish. Graduating from high school is a feat not all human beings can accomplish. Yes, becoming a doctor is harder than several things all people face in life (as for obvious reasons it most certainly should be) but it is also something that the people who will make exceptional doctors will ultimately be able to do. Thousands of your peers are doing it every year. If you did not seriously believe you have the fortitude, intelligence, and general wherewithall to become a doctor, you would not (most likely--I say that only because occasionally, and probably is not your case, there is the deluded eagle trying to be a ballerina instead of an aviator:) ) be seriously considering--no, planning--on attempting to be one (applying to med school). So, a lot of your performance in med school is based on how well you determine to make the curriculum something you "conquer." You will determine, in time to do well, the best way for you to succeed in your classes. All successful med students (eventual doctors) do. Do you think, when you picture yourself 8-10 years down the road, of yourself as being a doctor? Yes? Good. Then somehow you, that doctor, overcame the challenges of med school. If you are picturing yourself as that doctor, then you know you will successfully adapt to and complete, and even one day look back on--all that is required at med school.

Don't let it (med school and that which it entails) build to something in your mind so great that it causes you fear. Concern, caution...those are positive...but there is no need to fear the very path that will take you to what you most earnestly desire to be. Embrace something that promises, without fail, to bring you what you most want your life to have. It embraces you back (eventually :oops: ).

Best wishes in the world.
;)
E.A.
 
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