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Do you have to be mechanically Inclined to do dentistry?

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kent100s78

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Hello I would like to know do you have to be mechanically inclined in order to do Dentistry? What I mean,we all know dentist use there hands alot;but do you have to have some natural skills or is this something that can be learned?

I hope I didn't confuse anyone :confused: it's hard to explain what I mean.:oops:
 

organic

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I think as long as you are not obviously maladroit, you can be a good dentist. Better yet, if you are very meticulous, attentive to details and self- disciplined, you will have a good start as a dentist and the details wouldn't bore you.

I don't see what you mean by being mechanically inclinded, but as a dentist, you need to like doing thins with hands, not with your mind ( like physicians writing prescriptions only...etc)

you don't have to have a lot of knowledge about the mechanical and electrical components of dentistry. A lot of dentists have no clue as how to repair dental chairs or handpieces, or machines. But if you have mechanical or electrical knowledge, it is helpful
 

niksheth

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I think the writer meant inherent manual dexterity. I am curious about that myself. Anyone care to comment on that?
 

Dr.SpongeBobDDS

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I'm not sure if you're referring to manual dexterity or just mechanical aptitude. I think both are important traits for success in dental school, though. That doesn't mean you can't improve during school, it's just not something the school can really teach you.

Manual dexterity is just something that comes with practice, and a good sense of mechanics just comes from the way you look at the world. For example, some people can just see an example of a prep and know what burs they need to use while others need the profs to make out an ordered list. Some people look at their slowspeed handpiece with all the different collets, heads and adaptors and just inherently know how each piece fits together and how it will effect the operation of the handpiece, five months later some people still don't get it without referring to their notes.

I guess the bottom line is that if you have the drive you can improve in these areas, but expect it to take time and effort. The school will not teach it to you because it can't be taught. It's something you have to develop on your own.
 
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