freefall

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I failed 2cs, and besides the shame factor, I was wondering if anyone knows whether or not I will be able to begin my internship in Boston without a passing score. (I am trying to take the exam ASAP, but all the spots are filled across the country :scared: )


This test really blows, and I hope someone holds the NBME's feet to the fire.
 

AJM

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That's a really good question, since the 2CS test is so new. My guess is that because the test is new, they won't make you pass it before you start, but that's only a guess. The only problem that I could see is with you getting a limited Mass medical license before you start your internship. Every intern in MA has to have a limited license in order to even show up for their first day of internship. The limited license has much more lax rules than the full license requirements, so the MA Medical Board may allow you to get by without passing the test.
What you should do is talk directly with the Massachusetts Medical Board to find out their requirements about the new 2CS test for limited licenses. Their web site is http://www.massmedboard.org/

If the medical board is okay with you taking 2CS later, than your program should be okay with it as well (all the programs care about is making sure you are credentialed to work).
 

klubguts

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I would suggest referencing frieda with regard to this question. All of the programs i applied to were updated with a new section titled something like "need to pass step 2CS prior to starting internship" with yes or no in the column. This information wasn't there when i initially looked at the site in aug/sept, but was present last month. not sure if this will help you, but you may want to check it out. best of luck.
 
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freefall

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klubguts said:
I would suggest referencing frieda with regard to this question. All of the programs i applied to were updated with a new section titled something like "need to pass step 2CS prior to starting internship" with yes or no in the column. This information wasn't there when i initially looked at the site in aug/sept, but was present last month. not sure if this will help you, but you may want to check it out. best of luck.
For the prelim program I will almost 100% match at, FREIDA says 2CS status "unknown." Plus, I feel especially stupid b/c it is one of those big, fancy Boston hospitals, and I am worried 1) that I won't be able to start residency, and 2) even if I do, I will probably get a rather chilly reception.
 

AJM

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freefall said:
For the prelim program I will almost 100% match at, FREIDA says 2CS status "unknown." Plus, I feel especially stupid b/c it is one of those big, fancy Boston hospitals, and I am worried 1) that I won't be able to start residency, and 2) even if I do, I will probably get a rather chilly reception.
Well, depending on which one of the big, fancy Boston hospitals you're talking about, they tend to take care of their own. After you match there, ask them about it (after finding out about the licensure requirements). Chances are that if they do require it, they will make an exception for you provided you're able to get your license, and provided that you take 2CS in a reasonable amount of time. Again, this test is so new, that most places don't really know what to make of it yet.
 

Stinky Tofu

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www.massmedboard.org/physician/fees.shtm said:
Limited License Description and Requirements
A limited license is issued to physicians enrolled in post-graduate training programs in health care facilities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All such training must be done in ACGME accredited programs, or in a subspecialty clinical training or fellowship program in a training facility that has an approved program in the parent specialty. A physician who holds or who has ever held a full Massachusetts license is not eligible for a limited license.

To request an application for a limited license, please contact the health care facility where the post-graduate training will occur. A limited license application must be signed by the program director of the post-graduate training program prior to submission to the Board of Registration in Medicine.

Processing time for an initial limited license is approximately six to eight weeks after requisite materials from all sources have been received by the Board of Registration in Medicine. Some applications may require a longer processing time. An applicant may not engage in direct or indirect patient care until the Board has issued a limited license. After an initial limited license is issued by the Board, the relevant post-graduate training program will receive from the Board a certificate verifying the physician's limited license number. That license number will be retained for the duration of the physician's tenure in that particular training program.

A physician with a limited license is prohibited from "moonlighting" under any circumstances.

Requirements for a limited license for graduates of U.S. or Canadian medical schools are listed below:

Pre-medical Education: completion of two years of a pre-medical course of study in a college or university.
Medical Education: not less than three and one-half years of study in a legally chartered medical school having the power to grant degrees in medicine.

Requirements for a limited license for graduates of international medical schools are listed below:

Pre-Medical Education: completion of a minimum of two or more academic years, of not less than thirty-two weeks in each academic year, of a pre-medical education at a legally chartered college or university which must include courses in biology, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and physics, or their equivalent as determined by the Board.
Medical Education: (a) completion and attendance of four academic years of instruction of not less than thirty-two weeks in each academic year at a medical school which education is substantially equivalent to that of graduates of U.S. medical schools; and (b) completion of medical school clinical training which is substantially equivalent to the minimum standards required of U.S. medical school graduates, and done under the direct control of the medical school dean and under onsite supervision and evaluation by the faculty of the medical school in which the applicant was enrolled. Limited license applicants who cannot meet (b) must submit a request for a waiver of this requirement.
A notarized copy of the medical school diploma and a notarized copy of the English translation, if applicable.
Medical school transcripts with evaluations received directly from the medical school.
A notarized copy of a valid as of the date of licensure ECFMG certificate.
An ECFMG status report form received directly from ECFMG verifying completion of USMLE Steps 1 and 2, or NBME Parts I and II, or FLEX Components 1 and 2.
AJM is right regarding the lax rules for a limited license in MA. In fact, it's a little bit surprising how lax it is, but I think the reason is because they let the programs decide some of the issues because they are taking responsibility for you. If you are an AMG (MD or DO), you don't need to pass 2CS to get a limited license. If you look at the application form, there isn't even a section for the exam and they don't make you send official transcripts either. The rules are different for IMGs. If you are an AMG, I would just schedule the exam and fill out the application.

In the future, I wouldn't even plan on getting a full license unless you plan to moonlight. The full license application is such a pain if you don't need to have it and in most instances in MA, you don't need it (even for fellowships). Not only is a full license expensive, but the renewal form for a limited license takes about five minutes to fill out. Also, when you have a full license as a resident, there are more hoops to jump through at the credentialing department at each hospital you rotate through.
 

AJM

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Stinky Tofu said:
In the future, I wouldn't even plan on getting a full license unless you plan to moonlight. The full license application is such a pain if you don't need to have it and in most instances in MA, you don't need it (even for fellowships). Not only is a full license expensive, but the renewal form for a limited license takes about five minutes to fill out. Also, when you have a full license as a resident, there are more hoops to jump through at the credentialing department at each hospital you rotate through.
But it's SO NICE to be able to moonlight with the full license! I love being able to double my paycheck periodically with just a few shifts worth of work - it makes the extra licensing fee more than worth it. (The initial full license fee is only $650 or so -- you can pay for it with just one moonlighting shift). I also haven't had any extra hoops to jump through with hospital credentialling than my co-residents who have limited licenses. The full license renewal is also really easy -- took me 5 minutes (although it costs $450 as opposed to $100).

But I agree - if you don't plan on moonlighting, or if your program won't let you, than the limited license is definitely the way to go. :)
 

Stinky Tofu

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Okay, it's not that many hoops. :) With a limited license, my program never had to send the credentialing departments a copy of my full license application (a copy of the license isn't enough) and my state and federal DEA registration forms. I didn't photocopy my full license application before I mailed it so it was sort of a hassle to get the board to mail a copy to the credentialing department. I haven't renewed my full license so it's good to know it's just as easy as the limited license renewal. I'm not sure if I want to practice in MA and I'm not planning on moonlighting. Plus, in the future, with a full license from MA, I know I'll have to get the MA board to send information to whichever other state board I apply for full licensure in. In my situation, I just didn't think it was worth applying for the full license. I regret not getting by with the limited license for as long as possible.
 

Michelangelo

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freefall said:
I failed 2cs, and besides the shame factor, I was wondering if anyone knows whether or not I will be able to begin my internship in Boston without a passing score. (I am trying to take the exam ASAP, but all the spots are filled across the country :scared: )


It's not up to the residency program to decide. Be sure to check with your medical school to verify their policy for the Step 2 CS and graduation requirements. Currently, 60% of US medical schools require students to take and pass the CSE in order to graduate.

Hope this helps, and good luck with finding a new test date.