DO

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by ComplexPuzzle, Mar 14, 2002.

  1. ComplexPuzzle

    ComplexPuzzle shakin dat a**

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    For those of you who have seen this type of message before and feel it is nothing but a repeat I apologize in advance. However, I have read some other messages and none of them say exactly what I need to voice. So here goes. Recently, I decided the medicine was the career for me. So naturally, I said I am going to med school (allopathic that is). After all, it was all that I knew. So I am now a senior beginning the application process and I am contemplating whether MD is the right track for me. I have done some research and I like the DO philosophy that is aimed at treating the whole person not just the disease. I like that prevention is such an integrative part of osteopathic philosophy. But the question still remains about the equivalency of a DO to MD. Also, I don't want people to think that I am a DO because I couldn't get into an allopathic school. My question is then what is the difference as far as reputation with respect to DO's and MD's? And how does the actually philosophy difference between these two medical philosophies play out when one is actually practicing medicine? Sorry this is so long. :confused:
     
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  3. Doc AdamK in 2006

    Doc AdamK in 2006 Now 2 year UB Med Doc

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    Of Course going the MD path will help you get into a good residency. However if you are worried about reputation based on title, you have to think about who you are trying to please. Your committment to medicine and the way your patients will talk about you will give you your reputation. (NOT MD or DO). Do what is in your heart.

    Never!!!!!! second guess yourself. You have already made it. Your going to be a a physician. And if your a DO or MD, just be a great physician so you can contribute to this honorable profession.
     
  4. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned
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    I wholeheartedly agree with DocAdam.

    Your attitude and committment as a physician will mean more than the letters behind your name.

    Find a medical school that feels right and offers the things you want. Do well in school and there is NO reason that you cannot get a residency in anything you want.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Medic171

    Medic171 Senior Member

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    Quite often their is very little difference in the way that an MD and a DO practice medicine, other than the addition of some OMT by some(not all) DOs.

    As they said, it is MUCH more dependent on the person, not the letters or school. Many MD's are greater than some DOs, and many DO's are greater than some MDs. As far as reputation goes, it is somewhat still dependant on location. The further you look East and North, in general, the less problems you see with respect and recognition. Here in Michigan, there are honestly just as many DOs and MD's, and their is never any question, competition, or adversity between them. They are virtually interchangeable. Many of them practice together, it is very easy to find a family practice partnership with an MD and a DO together, or a mixture in large practices. I work for an urgent care center that is owned by 7 DOs, and 6 MD's. I have never heard a doc or a patient ever question what a DO is, their competency, their ability compared to an MD, in fact, I had never even heard them compared or looked at as "lower" than MDs until I got into the premed thing deeper, talked to people from out west, and joined SDN. Anyway, from what I understand, as you look, in general, further west and south, you find a bit more of the question or negativity towards DOs. I have never been to such a place, but several SDNers are from out there and can better describe and verify the condition out there,

    It is getting better, and there will come a time when DO bashing and questioning will be history. DOs are constantly proving that their education is NOT substandard. In fact, over the years, DO and MD practice seems to be getting more alike than different. If you were treated by 20 docs, 10 MD and 10 DO, eliminate OMT and the letters after their name, i bet few people would be able to identify which were which beyond guessing.

    Residency should be a factor in deciding. While DOs are eligible for MD residencies, it is more challenging to get them. First, DOs usually take a different, although similar and equal, licensing exam than the MD USMLE. However, if a DO wants an MD residency, he/she will almost always have to take the USMLE as well. Not a problem as far as education goes, but the USMLE is different, and after taking one stressful license exam, studying and taking another will be that much harder. Many of the things you use for those type of exams may be the "forget it after the test" type of thing, and you are sure to be exhausted after studying for one exam alone. I am a paramedic, and while my licensing exam is hardly comparable to a docs, I can tell you that after one day of testing for my state license exam, it would have been really tough to take another one shortly after. On top of that, most DO programs are highly geared toward family practice or close specialties(like internal med, peds, ect.). If you plan to take a specielty like say neurosurgery, you may want to investigate which programs best suit your goals. Not to say the DOs can't do that, I work with a DO neurosurgeon at the urgent care.

    Hope that helps, ask more ? if you have them or need more clarification. :confused:
     
  6. drchrislareau

    drchrislareau Member

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    The COMLEX has now been accepted as a valid test by the United States Federation of State Medical Boards (see <a href="http://www.dohealthnet.com/article1171.html" target="_blank">related article</a>) Many allopathic programs now accept this exam. Basically it compares you to other D.O.s. Many allopathic programs now have no problem accepting "top" D.O.s as defined by the COMLEX scores.
     
  7. Popoy

    Popoy SDN Super Moderator

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    Here's something that was posted before and I think is pertinent to this discussion:

    "There will always be those whose built-in sense of inferiority will lead them into dangerous personal and professional waters.

    There will always be those whose feeling of inferiority is an actuality rather than a complex.

    They will try to protect their actual inferiority by false status symbols.

    True status is earned, not granted.

    The measure of a physician is not a matter of degree but a matter of service.

    Neither an M.D. degree nor a D.O. degree makes a
    physician- it merely identifies him.

    And the physician who seeks status rather than
    knowledge worships at the feet of a false god and
    prostitutes his ability for service."


    George W. Northup, D.O.
     
  8. Freeeedom!

    Freeeedom! Senior Member

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    I will say this...I am very pleased with my Osteopathic Medical Education and I am very proud and impressed with my fellow classmates. Though, I think it may have opened more doors and given a more diverse clinical experience being a MD student, I am happy with the path that I have taken.
    With that being said, let me make this very clear. Oftentimes, there are HUGE differences in residency training (DO vs. MD). Diversity of pathology, didactics, size of hospital and population typically falls in favor of Allopathic Institutions (with a primary exception being FP-- I think the more solid DO programs are superior). That is my primary reason for doing an Allopathic Residency. So, medical education is one thing, residency education is another.
    Regardless, always be proud to be part of the Osteopathic Community of Physicians.
     
  9. jhug

    jhug 1K Member

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    you will decide your fate, not the acronyms that follow your name. Be the best at what you do and take advantage of the opportunities given to you and you will end up where you want. As for your concern that you don't want people to think that you are a DO because you couldn't get into an allopathic school-- that remains to be seen. If you are a DO simply because you could "hack it"-- it'll show-- if you are a physician who just happens to also be a DO, that's different.
     

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