nutritionfirst

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I've been in contact with a recruiter for some time now. I realize that things are being gloried to pull me in, but I want to ask the opinions of those experiencing military medicine....

My situation: military has always intrigued me but I never planned on actually joining. Only way to pay for med school seems to be military, which is somewhat a win win since it's always been an interest.

So let's say I get all 4 yrs of med school paid for by the army, I do a residency either with the military or a civilian residency, and afterward I serve my 4 years pay-back as an active duty physician on a base, Fort Gordon for instance.

Now, after those 4 obligatory years, can I decide to leave military medicine and join a civilian setting? (i.e. a baptist hospital in Chattanooga TN or what have you)

Also, would coming out of a military setting be an advantage/disadvantage to seek civilian employment elsewhere?

Thanks in advance for the input
 

Mace1370

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Jul 9, 2007
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I've been in contact with a recruiter for some time now. I realize that things are being gloried to pull me in, but I want to ask the opinions of those experiencing military medicine....

My situation: military has always intrigued me but I never planned on actually joining. Only way to pay for med school seems to be military, which is somewhat a win win since it's always been an interest.

So let's say I get all 4 yrs of med school paid for by the army, I do a residency either with the military or a civilian residency, and afterward I serve my 4 years pay-back as an active duty physician on a base, Fort Gordon for instance.

Now, after those 4 obligatory years, can I decide to leave military medicine and join a civilian setting? (i.e. a baptist hospital in Chattanooga TN or what have you)

Also, would coming out of a military setting be an advantage/disadvantage to seek civilian employment elsewhere?

Thanks in advance for the input
You're free to go wherever you want after your commitment is up.

Also, don't expect to serve your entire commitment state side. You will, with almost a 100% guarantee, deploy.
 

DocArmy

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Aug 16, 2009
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I know you waited almost a whole week to repost this question, so, here it goes.

Yes, you get to keep your doctor degree when you leave the military.

May I ask why you "never planned on actually joining?" What I mean is, are you sure that you want to be in the military? Not just get a scholarship? I have family who did the HPSP JUST for the money, and they're now trying to use every trick they can to weasel out of deploying. This isn't a charity. You're not signing up for the "US Government Running Club and Scholarship Organization." It is the military. You will deploy and you will be fortunate enough to take care of the people who bleed for this country and for their families.

I'm sorry to be blunt, but both of your posts now seem to imply that you don't know much about the military, military medicine, and that your primary concern is the scholarship. There are other ways to pay for school if that's your primary concern. Little towns will pay for your schooling via a primary care scholarship and then you just go be a small town doctor for a few years, for example.

If you'd like to be in the military, then by all means sign up. If you're just going to "hurt your back" or "get transferred to a nondeployable billet because you know a guy" or whatever when it's your turn to step up and put in work, then don't bother. You'll be taking the place of someone who wants to do the job.
 

DeadCactus

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My situation: military has always intrigued me but I never planned on actually joining. Only way to pay for med school seems to be military, which is somewhat a win win since it's always been an interest.
No, debt is the only way to pay for medical school. The question is whether that debt is time, loans, or another four years as daddy's little boy rather than an adult. The vast majority of medical students fall under the loans category.

The options differ in comforts and freedoms, not in the ability to pay for medical school...
 

tronad

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Would coming out of a military setting be an advantage/disadvantage to seek civilian employment elsewhere?
I'd also be interested in hearing about other's experiences with finding civilian employment after finishing military commitments.