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Does anyone else experience this?

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Ella Shepherd

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It's about surgery.

You see, I like watching surgeries. I don't feel like fainting, barfing or anything like that. But, I can't stand watching eye surgeries. I don't get it. It freaks me out! Does anyone have the same or a similar experience?

I'll be shadowing some doctors at a department of surgery soon. I might get a little light-headed in an actual face-to-face surgery. I dunno. It might possibly be because of the smell. (There is a smell, right?) But anyway...I'm excited to experience that. But I still wonder why I can't stomach eye surgery...:confused:
 

Depakote

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i'd say everyone has some trigger... I've seen surgeries, never had a problem in gross lab but for some reason pulling a brain out of a bucket in neuro lab sends a chill down my spine...

might just be a texture thing.

anyway, nothing to worry about unless you have your heart set on optho
 

Ella Shepherd

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i'd say everyone has some trigger... I've seen surgeries, never had a problem in gross lab but for some reason pulling a brain out of a bucket in neuro lab sends a chill down my spine...

might just be a texture thing.

anyway, nothing to worry about unless you have your heart set on optho

Thank God, I don't! But I will have a sty removed soon...so that's freaking me out a little...At least it's not gonna be on the eye. :scared:
 

Bacchus

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I think it could be for one of many reasons. We all have our triggers like Depakote said. For me, I can sit down and eat dinner over a nice helping of Discovery Health but if I were to see someone munching on bugs at the same time on Fear Factor it would be a less pleasant story.

As far as the eye, I think this may come down to "tabooness." As a society we place a heavy value upon sight and any possible compromise of that probably scares us. As we were growing up we were always told protect our eyes, don't run with that scissor, wear safety goggles in lab. Its "raised" our eyes to a level that other, less sensitized parts of our body have not risen to. People break limbs all the time and not many people are repulsed by it. I think its the commonality of the procedure that can affect us.

Of course, there are always different reasons.
 

shevie

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im ok with eye surgery. im ok w/ brain surgery, open heart, basically e/t ive seen so far. Find it all fascinating. EXCEPT: amputations. Whether its a toe or an entire leg, I get nauseous. I did research for a vascular surgeon a few summers ago, and he let me "shadow" him during his surgeries when I was done in the afternoons, I stopped going to the amputations. i really couldnt take it....I also agree. e/o has a "trigger point" or whatever, a "sore spot." eyes could be yours.
 

BlitzSleep

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It's about surgery.

You see, I like watching surgeries. I don't feel like fainting, barfing or anything like that. But, I can't stand watching eye surgeries. I don't get it. It freaks me out! Does anyone have the same or a similar experience?

I'll be shadowing some doctors at a department of surgery soon. I might get a little light-headed in an actual face-to-face surgery. I dunno. It might possibly be because of the smell. (There is a smell, right?) But anyway...I'm excited to experience that. But I still wonder why I can't stomach eye surgery...:confused:


Oh yeah, and trust me, you'll never forget the smell.
 

BlitzSleep

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I hope that's a good thing.

Depends on the individual. When I observe a surgery, sometimes they use this tool that burns. It's kind of like a soldering iron. The last time I saw them use it, I believe, was to cut out a lymph node. Sorry to ruin any surprises ;)
 

StevenJ128

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Depends on the individual. When I observe a surgery, sometimes they use this tool that burns. It's kind of like a soldering iron. The last time I saw them use it, I believe, was to cut out a lymph node. Sorry to ruin any surprises ;)

That would be the bovie. Don't worry, you get used to it after a while. (I hate it, but had a friend who said he got hungry from smelling it). The only smell you really have to worry about is dead bowel (smells like sh!t x 100 with a hint of mint).

I've seen bits and pieces of most every surgery (benefit of working in an OR), and the only thing that has ever bothered me was seeing a beating heart emerge after cutting through the fat between the lungs. I got over it quick.
 

Ella Shepherd

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Depends on the individual. When I observe a surgery, sometimes they use this tool that burns. It's kind of like a soldering iron. The last time I saw them use it, I believe, was to cut out a lymph node. Sorry to ruin any surprises ;)

Cool! LOL Nah, that's alright. :D
 

ChubbyChaser

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Lets see, I dont like Dog Poop eventhough i like Dogs.. I refuse to work a pooper scooper.
 

Ella Shepherd

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That would be the bovie. Don't worry, you get used to it after a while. (I hate it, but had a friend who said he got hungry from smelling it). The only smell you really have to worry about is dead bowel (smells like sh!t x 100 with a hint of mint).

I've seen bits and pieces of most every surgery (benefit of working in an OR), and the only thing that has ever bothered me was seeing a beating heart emerge after cutting through the fat between the lungs. I got over it quick.

Ugh. :barf:I hope I don't get to smell that...:D

I asked the head of the orthopedics department about the smell. He said it's alright then he mumbled something like "except the diabetic patients" or something like that. I'm just not so sure...:p

I'm quite excited to start. My first day will be on the 22nd. That's just a few days from now. I'll be getting my scrubs and stuff tomorrow...wow...this is really happening. lol :luck:
 

Pedsbro

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Ugh. :barf:I hope I don't get to smell that...:D

I asked the head of the orthopedics department about the smell. He said it's alright then he mumbled something like "except the diabetic patients" or something like that. I'm just not so sure...:p

I'm quite excited to start. My first day will be on the 22nd. That's just a few days from now. I'll be getting my scrubs and stuff tomorrow...wow...this is really happening. lol :luck:


I worked in a pathology lab for 2 years...autopsies, seeing just about every organ "fresh" out of someone during surgery to cut frozen sections and do gross exams on while they were on the table, etc. Nothing ever got to me and I saw some very crazy stuff (and smelled nasty stuff as well). Colons tend to be the worst of the fresh specimens because for whatever reason it seems like the enemas don't always do their job if ya know what i mean. We often had a little "surprise" waiting for us when we "filleted" it open. Anyways, getting back to live surgery...I'm shadowing a pediatric neurosurgeon right now...very cool stuff, but while I don't get queasy one bit, many emotions run through me seeing brain surgery or spinal surgery on infants and small children, more so than adults. I suppose that's natural, but the type of patients you see (2 month olds vs adults) can matter just as much as what you're actually seeing (amputations vs appendectomy).

That comment about diabetics from an ortho...he probably is referring to the fact that many diabetics have nasty wounds on their feet and legs that get infected and gangrene (one of the worst smells)..which is why they have to be removed. We used to get diabetic amputations in the path lab...not pleasant at all. (we also used to get enucleations...removal of the entire eye...so don't go into path if eyes gross you out).

In my opinion, unless you've had a similar job or shadowing experience inside an OR like me and others, you really won't know how you'll react until you get up close and personal. Watching Discovery Health and ER and all those are nothing even close to the real thing. At the same time, not every doctor has to deal with that sort of stuff once you get past med school...so if you can stomach it for a few weeks in a clerkship, you might not ever have to see/smell something "gross" again.

Oh yeah, and you do get used to the bovie (the cauderizing blade many surgeons use). You had better get used to it....the smell of burnt tissue is usually hanging in the air of every major O.R. I've been in!
 

AKu2984

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It's about surgery.

You see, I like watching surgeries. I don't feel like fainting, barfing or anything like that. But, I can't stand watching eye surgeries. I don't get it. It freaks me out! Does anyone have the same or a similar experience?

I'll be shadowing some doctors at a department of surgery soon. I might get a little light-headed in an actual face-to-face surgery. I dunno. It might possibly be because of the smell. (There is a smell, right?) But anyway...I'm excited to experience that. But I still wonder why I can't stomach eye surgery...:confused:


It's funny you mention that...I was just having a conversation today with my best friend and her mom about how eye surgeries totally freak me out! I don't think it's anything to worry about...as Depakote said, everyone is going to have something that makes them cringe. Eyes are VERY personal...it makes sense to me that you can't stomach it. Perhaps that's because I feel the same way. Either way...don't fret it! I'm sure you'll be fine.
 

gamepad

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Anything having to do with the pelvic bone freaks me out.
 

BlitzSleep

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That would be the bovie. Don't worry, you get used to it after a while. (I hate it, but had a friend who said he got hungry from smelling it). The only smell you really have to worry about is dead bowel (smells like sh!t x 100 with a hint of mint).

I've seen bits and pieces of most every surgery (benefit of working in an OR), and the only thing that has ever bothered me was seeing a beating heart emerge after cutting through the fat between the lungs. I got over it quick.

I know, it's is like gasoline....you shouldn't smell it, but when you do, you can't help but to smell it some more :p
 

mdmarty

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Has anyone actually every fainted while shadowing? It happened to me today :oops:. I had some problems with vasovagal reactions since early high school; they would always occur at the worst moment, like when talking with someone one-on-one. But now, it happened when I was just a fly on the wall shadowing a plastic surgeon who was removing a small epithelial tumor (~1cm). Almost no blood and nothing really to make me uneasy.

Normally I can react in time, and just sitting down takes care of things. But this time I was in a small and crowded outpatient room with no chairs. I knew I was going down, and soon after I was lying in the hallway with nurses and assistants around me. Supposedly I wasn't the first, but I hope they did not tell me that to just make me feel better :(.

Lesson leaned: French cuff shirt + tie + whitecoat are not appropriate for even minor procedures. With the OR light on, I was boiling inside.
 

Pedsbro

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Has anyone actually every fainted while shadowing? It happened to me today :oops:. I had some problems with vasovagal reactions since early high school; they would always occur at the worst moment, like when talking with someone one-on-one. But now, it happened when I was just a fly on the wall shadowing a plastic surgeon who was removing a small epithelial tumor (~1cm). Almost no blood and nothing really to make me uneasy.

Normally I can react in time, and just sitting down takes care of things. But this time I was in a small and crowded outpatient room with no chairs. I knew I was going down, and soon after I was lying in the hallway with nurses and assistants around me. Supposedly I wasn't the first, but I hope they did not tell me that to just make me feel better :(.

Lesson leaned: French cuff shirt + tie + whitecoat are not appropriate for even minor procedures. With the OR light on, I was boiling inside.

You're definitely not the first anywhere, I promise you. When my brother was in med school, he told me a story about how a med student was observing an open procedure in the OR..I think holding retractors or somehow involved...and fainted into the sterile field and onto the patient! If you're gonna go down in that situation...fall backwards!!! :)
 

uscmk

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I was in your same shoes-- I actually just saw a sty-removal surgery not too long ago, and it was pretty wild! But as the doctors looked at the board and decided where to place me, I prayed for anything but an ophthalmology case, which of course is what I ended up in. I'd say that the key is to watch from a distance at first before you move in closer, and KEEP BREATHING. In the surgery I observed, the lady was actually awake (although highly sedated) and talking to the surgeon while he prodded around the inside of her eye. The conversation was highly amusing and I'm pretty sure that was the only thing that kept me from focusing on how much I really don't want to end up in that particular field. Just hope for an awesome team that you can talk to and who knows, you'll probably walk out feeling very accomplished! Good luck :)
 
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