Does anyone else find it frightening to be a humanities major?

rambo

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So now that I'm only about 18 core science credits from a Biotech degree, I'm starting to realize I really don't want to take these classes. Especially with my GPA wavering at about 3.5 as I end my sophomore year (it's not a pretty 3.5, trust me). I've kind of always wanted to be a humanities major (English, Phil, or Rel), and that's about 45 credits away. After finishing distribution requirements, either degree would take the same amount of time to complete.

I guess the point is that with a science degree, you can always get a masters if medicine doesn't pan out. Engineering gets you a 50k a year job. With a humanities degree, you're kind of doomed to teach. But with the numbers game as it is, I'd rather spend the next two years getting A's in classes I enjoy a bit more, instead of spending it grinding out in linear mathematics for genetic analysis and five other upper level sciences.

If this is such a numbers game, why not play it?

I guess I'm wondering if anyone else found it unnerving to make the jump into a field that's not as "practical" as an engineering or science degree.
 

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rambo said:
So now that I'm only about 18 core science credits from a Biotech degree, I'm starting to realize I really don't want to take these classes. Especially with my GPA wavering at about 3.5 as I end my sophomore year (it's not a pretty 3.5, trust me). I've kind of always wanted to be a humanities major (English, Phil, or Rel), and that's about 45 credits away. After finishing distribution requirements, either degree would take the same amount of time to complete.

I guess the point is that with a science degree, you can always get a masters if medicine doesn't pan out. Engineering gets you a 50k a year job. With a humanities degree, you're kind of doomed to teach. But with the numbers game as it is, I'd rather spend the next two years getting A's in classes I enjoy a bit more, instead of spending it grinding out in linear mathematics for genetic analysis and five other upper level sciences.

If this is such a numbers game, why not play it?

I guess I'm wondering if anyone else found it unnerving to make the jump into a field that's not as "practical" as an engineering or science degree.
You really need to broaden your horizens. Once you are willing to do additional schooling after undergrad, you really aren't "doomed to teach" if medicine doesn't pan out. I don't even believe your premise that you are precluded from getting a masters degree in a science with an humanities undergrad; certainly you could get an MPH, etc. However even if that's true, lots of people with humanities degrees go on to get graduate higher degrees enabling them to practice law, business, accounting, etc., all careers netting, on average, better salaries than engineering (if that is really a big concern for you). College is a time best spent taking courses you enjoy.