1. Guest, be sure to check out How To Get Into Dental School, our free downloadable PDF with step-by-step details for dental school applicants!
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Does anyone know...

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by chuggchug, May 29, 2001.

  1. chuggchug

    chuggchug New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2001
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    if doing dental hygienist program along with a seperate undergraduate course work would make me more competitive when applying for dental schools in the spring? Just wondering! Please, someone help me here!
     
  2. Dr. Pedo

    Dr. Pedo Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2001
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    3
    Here's my 2 cents worth.

    I sincerely believe using RDH (reg. dent. hyg.) to "pad" your resume is a bad choice. RDH is a career. A position held in great respect in the dental community and they are greatly needed. If you have absolutely no intention on being a RDH, then it truly shows your hidden agenda! Now if you've been a RDH for a couple of years and you find yourself drawn to the priviledges of a dentist-----that is a whole 'nother story.

    The reason for the silence you are getting from the dental schools is obvious. They are seeking someone who has a passion for dentistry. One might think becoming a RDH is showing your passion----that is true if you intend I being a RDH for a while. Unfortunately, it doesn't demonstrate this if you intend on becoming a dentist with no desire for being a RDH. That simply shows immaturity and possibly a lack of true direction. Several individuals will question your motives. The interview could be brutal. Some question could be: Why did you get a RDH degree? Did you ever plan on being a RDH? Why aren't you a practicing RDH? Do you not respect to field? ETC...

    The schooling you receive isn't going to be more beneficial than your undergrad pre-reqs. Especially if you don't intend on practicing as a RDH. Many dental schools don't accept RDH courses (bio. chem., physio, micro.) as equivalent to 4-year college "intense" courses---therefore, I doubt they going to help you in your first 2 years of dental school. Now the manual dexterity and procedures learned in RDH curriculum would be beneficial----but once again we are back to my original opinion.


    If you are looking for experience then try volunteering, or possibly becoming a dental assistant. There are several ways to gain insight and advantages in dentistry without jeapordizing your motives or character. If you are looking for help with manual dexterity----pick-up a hobby like modeling (cars or airplanes). If you truly want to set yourself apart from others----start preparing for the DAT and score 22+/22+. By doing that you're a shoe-in for an interview, if not enrollment. And if you do that well on your DAT----then you should be adequately, if not extremely, prepared for your first 2 years of dental school.

    Best wishes,
    R.R.B
     
  3. gower

    gower 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2000
    Messages:
    1,031
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dr.2b is right on target!

    I was especially interested by the statement on modeling. I have been a modeler for years. No more than one or two dentists and predental students I knew modeled planes, trains, airplanes, anything. I am surprised because I believe that modeling helps develop the dexterity skills needed by a dentist, but I guess you can get by without it. To bad; I find it an enjoyable hobby.
     
  4. Dr. Pedo

    Dr. Pedo Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2001
    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gower,

    I definitely agree, modeling takes incredible precision and dexterity. It suprises me a little----that there aren't more pre-dents or dents involved in modeling. Yet, somehow I understand why----I suppose, the last thing a dentist wants to do when he/she gets home----is some more fine-motor skill activities! :)

    R.R.B
     

Share This Page