Does stress exist in the environment or the individual?

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by Mattalbie, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. Mattalbie

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Hi

    I'm researching the question "Does stress exist in the environment or the individual?" Can anyone point me towards websites for research?

    Thanks
     
  2. Ollie123

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    4,671
    Likes Received:
    1,077
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    I don't know of any specific websites beyond the usual lit search databases. Are you looking for a stress lab website or something like that? Its obviously a pretty highly researched area so any of the usual databases should get some hits.

    I will say that from personal experiences, its about 10x the individual for every 1x the environment. Just from looking at grad students, some people can do nothing and barely keep themselves afloat, others can juggle 100x as much and be fine.
     
  3. erg923

    erg923 Regional Clinical Officer, Cenpatico National
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Messages:
    9,586
    Likes Received:
    3,199
    Status:
    Psychologist
    From a strictly semantic point of view, stress potentials exists in the environment but is only operationalized in an individual.
     
  4. Mattalbie

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Yes, I'm trying to find articles that compare environmental factors to personal factors.

    Thanks
     
  5. Ollie123

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    4,671
    Likes Received:
    1,077
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    I guess I'm confused - are you asking for websites or specific articles?

    If websites, any of the usual suspects (Psycinfo, Pubmed, google scholar) should get you there.
     
  6. Cosmo75

    Cosmo75 Post-Doctoral Fellow
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Post Doc
    "Let me do my best to change the unfortunate condition or accept it and live with it if I truly find that I can't change it. Whining about how awful it is will only make it seem worse than bad and make me feel more miserable!"
    --Albert Ellis

    :D
     
  7. Danbo1957

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    334
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    The answer is yes :) - look for websites that offer a basic understanding of biological evolution.
     
  8. biogirl215

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2007
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    0
    Try looking up the diathesis/stress model, particularly as it relates to depression (i.e., sociotropic vs. achievement-orientated, etc).

    Good luck!
     
  9. Mattalbie

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Thanks for the feedback it's very much appreciated.

    I'll check out the diathesis model, I hadn't actually considered that.

    I'll check out the websites / articles. I'm a little confused on Pub Med, I know I'm doing something wrong. It's not a pay site is it? I only seem to be able to access the abstracts and can't get any further.

    I was also looking at external factors noise, lighting, temp, odour...what do you think? I've also been advised to look at bullying in the work place.
     
  10. toby jones

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Messages:
    548
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm wondering how much this issue might parallel the debate over whether trauma is environmental or within the individual. Some theorists think that certain events are objectively traumatic, for example, while other theorists think that trauma is a state of individuals and individual variation is such that it doesn't make sense to talk of events being traumatic.

    It reminds me of the old saw in philosophy about where the colors are... Is 'red' a subjective experience or is it a property of objects in the world or is it a property of my subjective experience or what?

    But maybe this isn't what you had in mind at all...

    It is one thing to ask what the (necessary) *causes* are - to ask whether they are environmental or internal to the individual or both (and characterizing what the difference between those is supposed to be).

    It is another thing to ask what the *nature* is - to ask whether it is itself environmental or internal to the individual or both (and characterizing what the difference between those is supposed to be).

    Paul Griffiths has this nice chat about nature vs nurture in his book 'What Emotions Really Are'. He characterizes it as different degrees of environmental invariance. So, for example, is the human tendency to grow limbs due to nature or nurture? If you alter the environment radically enough (e.g., by depriving the foetus of nutrition) then it won't grow limbs. Does this show limb growth to be environmental? The thought is that it is fairly genetic (where 'genetic' is to be understood as some combination of fairly environmentally invariant, species typical etc etc etc). He has about 5 different criteria that people muddle together in considering that something is innate / genetic. And arguments to show that the presence of one doesn't make the presence of the others more likely. If you are interested in the thought that inner / outer (diathesis / stress, environment / individual) comes in degrees and there is a significant interplay between both then I'd reccommend Griffiths for getting clearer on that...
     
  11. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty
    Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2006
    Messages:
    21,379
    Likes Received:
    2,291
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I've only seen abstracts on it. I've used it a few times to dig up interesting sounding articles, which I then looked up through online databases at my school.
     
  12. toby jones

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Messages:
    548
    Likes Received:
    1
    And that is precisely why (IMHO) PubMed is crap.

    FULL TEXT is what you want.. At least, it is what I want.

    I guess things might be different if you want to do a cursory summing of pro and con abstracts on a particular variety of treatment or something...

    But I'm not THAT trusting of methodology...
     
  13. Ollie123

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    4,671
    Likes Received:
    1,077
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Pubmed is nice since it picks up a fair number of articles that get missed by things like PsycInfo. For example, when I'm researching some neuroscience or pharmacology topics, psycinfo misses a LOT so you aren't exactly doing a thorough search.Unfortunately, pubmed doesn't interface with university libraries the way good search engines do, so you have to look the full text up separately. For me, google scholar is starting to take over pubmed's role for that reason. Google scholar has the same advantage of picking up articles that psycinfo misses, but its interfaced with our library system so I can get to the full text easier.Unfortunately, google scholar has the same problem as google, in that it casts so wide a net you get a simply heinous amount of garbage hits that seemingly have nothing to do with the topic. I'm also not a huge fan of their interface. Really no database is perfect, but I've been getting by using a combination of PsycInfo, Google Scholar, and direct journal lookups.I will say all my search engine frustrations pale in comparison to when full text is physically present in the library, but not available online. If it isn't in the library, we can get it emailed to us via interlibrary loans, but if it IS in the library and they just cheaped out on the online version, we have to go and copy it ourselves.Paper is outdated. Get the friggin things online. Sell off the paper copies and spend the money you get and the money you save on shelf-space on online versions if you have to. Anyone actually hand-searching hundreds of journals for their research is probably not efficient enough to justify keeping on staff these days anyways. Thus ends my rant on library services;)
     
  14. Cosmo75

    Cosmo75 Post-Doctoral Fellow
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Post Doc
    I use PubMed heavily then go get the articles from my school/practicum library database. There are some free text articles on there, but they're pretty few and far between.

    I also like Google scholar and Google books.
     
  15. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty
    Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2006
    Messages:
    21,379
    Likes Received:
    2,291
    Status:
    Psychologist
    I typically use various boolean searches across databases, combined with some Google Scholar searches to ferret out some lesser utilized stuff, and then I just start digging from there. I've learned that word choice and structure makes or breaks a comprehensive review.
     
  16. The2abraxis

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student

    someone in my school actually did an Honors Thesis on something like this (does enviorment affect stress habituation), and he/she proved that changing enviorments does alter the effect of stress habituation :)
     
  17. Mattalbie

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Don't suppose you have further details re your friends thesis you mentioned
     
  18. The2abraxis

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    1st Place: Kevin M. Palmer, The Effect of Physical Context of Previous Stress Expsoure on Stress Response Habituation
    Mentors:
    Shannon N. Whitten (Psychology), Karen Mottarella (Psychology)
    Objective: This study investigated the effect of the environment on stress response habituation. Animal studies have shown that habituation to stress is modified by the environmental context of previous exposure to stress. This study sought to identify this effect in humans so that the health detriments of stress may be avoided.

    that was on the website, hope this helps a little (it may or may not be on a database like Psychinfo)
     
  19. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    3,225
    Likes Received:
    403
    Pubmed actually does, or can anyways, interface with a university library system. The trick is usually to log into it via the university's library page. Then you should be able to click on links to full text options. I tend to favor pubmed, but I also like google scholar.
     
  20. myelin

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    This is because many neuro/bio/pharma articles are indexed under Medline, and PubMed includes Medline.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query/static/overview.html#Medline

    It took me a while to figure this out as well.
     
  21. Mattalbie

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    Really appreciate all the help and advice it's so helpful. Thankyou.

    Here is another one..........

    "Assumption of effect" (What does this mean?)

    I'm relating this to work stress as Ben C Fletcher has done work in this area. Not exactly sure what it means though. I think it means who ever is designing a particular study just assumes certain factors will have certain (a)ffects but I haven't got a clue really.

    Any ideas?
     
  22. psychwanabe

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    Messages:
    674
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    All stress exists in one environment: grad school :laugh:

    Sorry, I just had to say that.
     
  23. The2abraxis

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Psychology Student
    thinking about it, you could say it lies in the individual because what causes the stress can be directly related to how a person interprets his/her surroundings, etc...

    one person could be in a strange enviorment and think "i love new enviorments, gives me a chance to experience new things" and feel excited with little stress

    where another person could think "i hate new surroundings, i will probably look stupid to everyone" and feel uncomftorable and feel stress

    also how the person interprets the activity in an enviorment (a surgery, a test, a baseball game, etc...) can show how much stress he/she will have.

    sure if the enviorment wasn't there then the person might not be feeling stress, but because they are in a certain enviorment does not mean they have to have stress
    :-D
     

Share This Page