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Does the type of job experience matter?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by XRanger, Mar 4, 2007.

  1. XRanger

    XRanger Junior Member
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    does certain jobs look better or do they all count the same?

    for example should I try to look for a science related job like lab assistant or pharmacy clerk as opposed to jobs such as waiters, office assistant, library assistant.
     
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  3. DropkickMurphy

    DropkickMurphy Membership Revoked
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    I think while healthcare related work might carry a little more weight, so long as you weren't pimpin', hookin' or dealin' in your spare time.....you should be OK.
     
  4. Pansit

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    I think it matters because the whole application process is very subjective. If you worked at a hospital for three years, you will be seen as someone who got a lot of clinical experience, it can be a very important aspect in your personal statement, you can get great recommendations from a physician (as opposed to someone who just shadowed for a few times), it will be hard for anyone to question your desire as a physician if you have worked around that field...etc. I dont think you can have these advantages if you just worked as a waiter. However, it is not a negative to work at other fields to earn a wage, but it just wont give advantages that certain healthcare fields can give you. Even a lab assistant is helpful because it gives you research experience, more knowledge about some field, get to know the professor better...etc. If you have a choice without other limiting circumstances, go for the job that helps your application out.
     
  5. geneticclone

    geneticclone Guest

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    When you say 3 years of working in a hospital, how are you supposed to work in a hospital? Ive been looking around at hospitals where i could get a job and there are none for first year undergrads.
     
  6. sejin8642

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    I am not certain if three years working at a hospital is more positive than the others. Because med schools are fond of those who have many different kind experiences(diversity) and they know med students will be sick of working with patients after graduation.
     
  7. Pansit

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    There are lots of hospital jobs you can do. Go to a hospital website, look for employment opportunities and you will see plenty, that does not require some degree. Something like a radiology assistant or transporter, or you can work in the hospital lab or in patholog...etc. You just have to look. The statement about 3 years is just an example. It could be over the summer or succesive summers or on a part time basis. The important factor is to get the experience and make some connections that will help you later on in the application cycle.
     
  8. Pansit

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    Yes, being well-rounded is an important aspect of your application. But how does being a waiter or working at mcdonalds or burger king make you more well rounded. Aside from working in a clinical setting, you can be active in some community volunteer program. Be a part of your school intramurals or art club or whatever. You can study abroad one summer. There are hundreds of other ways to be well rounded. Take a very diverse selection of classes or even major in something other than bio/chem/biochem. And as a word of caution, so you won't make this mistake, if you ever make it to a medical school interview, do not ever state the words "will be sick of working with patients". You will be working with patients for the rest of your life. If you are sick of them by just working in a hospital as some tech, it will not get any better as a physician and that is a red flag in an interview. As you progress in medical school, you should be more anxious and excited at being able to use your knowledge to help them. Contrary to your opinion, I think most medical students are not sick of patients by the time they graduate. After the first two years of pre-clinicals, they are probably more happy to actually be able to apply what they have learned. Just my own opinion
     
  9. pagemmapants

    pagemmapants Unknown Member
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    I'm with Pansit on this one. While maybe "a job that's in a hospital" isn't necessarily the best criterion, perhaps "a job somewhat related to medicine" is better. Examples: lifeguarding, EMT-ing, wilderness guide (with WFR certification).
    This doesn't mean that jobs that AREN'T related to medicine aren't worthwhile, but if you're venturing outside of this zone, make sure it's something that stands out. Waitering and bartending work well if you're in need of $$ but I can't guarantee it'll impress anyone. On the other hand, being a camp counselor for special needs kids or teaching something or starting your own internet business won't necessarily pay off but will give you something to talk about in interviews other than how many PCR reactions you've done.
     
  10. Pansit

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    agreed...I didnt necesarilly mean just hospital based, but something that makes you stand out is always a positive, and not all jobs can accomplish that:thumbup:
     
  11. sejin8642

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    You misinterpreted the word "sick." Don't translate it literally. When I said "sick," it means "You will be working with patients for the rest of your life" like you mentioned. And my point was doing something special other than med-related activities would be also positive since premeds will do "med-related activities" if they make it to the schools. Sorry if I confused you.
     
  12. LizzyM

    LizzyM the evil queen of numbers
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    We had an informal conversation about this after an adcom meeting. The members were very impressed by people who had done blue collar labor at some point in their lives (after h.s.). In their opinion, waiters work with customers, are under stress, time constrained, work in collaboration with other workers in the restaurant.... there are actually quite a few parallels with work as a physician. It also helps a young person to see "how the other half lives", and to have an opportunity to work along side adults who are not college educated and for whom the restaurant, store, factory or job site is where they expect to be for the rest of their working lives.
     
  13. Krisss17

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    A couple of jobs that you could look into would be:

    1. Transporter which will give you exposure to patients plus you'll really get to go all over the hospital and not have to stay in just one location.

    2. Housekeeping...yeah, it doesn't sound glamourous, but it could be a way to get your foot in the door, and possibly transfer after a bit.

    3. Working in dietary and serving the meals to the patients.

    Other jobs that would require a little training first, would be becoming a patient care assistant or a phlebotomist.

    Even volunteering in a hospital may provide a future job opportunity. If you are in your freshman year, this will give you that opportunity more so because of the time element. Work the volunteer position like a job...over more hours, let the volunteer coordinator know when you are available and be on call for them. During this time, you can look at the job postings that are usually posted somewhere in the hospital (usually by cafeteria). When you apply, you'll probably get a good reference from the volunteer coordinator.

    Good luck...
     
  14. XRanger

    XRanger Junior Member
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    I'm still contemplating whther to find off campus jobs like lab or pharmacy assistant in hospital or should I just apply to on campus library job.

    the problem is the closest hospital from my school is about 30-40 min depending on traffic and I'm already volunteering there.

    Is the 40 min drive worth it just to have an extra science/clinical related experience?
     
  15. DropkickMurphy

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    I knew those summers I spent doing roofing during my first three years of high school would pay off eventually. I highly recommend such work, if nothing more than for the interesting and unique people you will meet. Some of the most noble and respectable people I know are also the least "educated" in a traditional sense. In fact, the smartest person I know is a dairy farmer who dropped out of high school. I've yet to meet a physician who is nearly that well rounded. If I am half that knowledgeable some day, I will be a happy man.
     
  16. CTtarheel

    CTtarheel Senior Member
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    I think any work experience is looked upon as a plus. I had one interviewer specifically asked me if i'd worked a typical high school/college job, where I actually had to deal with customers all day. Working teaches you how to be nice to a**holes which is definitely an important life skil.
     
  17. GoBlueMD83

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    Maybe try asking the volunteer coordinator if there are any jobs that typically hire people who volunteer... I knew of people who got hired as patient transporters after volunteering for a semester in the Post-anesthesia care unit at my university hospital, there should probably be a similar position that the volunteer coordinator might know about. They probably won't be happy to lose you as a volunteer, but if they know about any sort of opportunities they'd tell you. Adcoms don't care if you get payed for your clinical/science exposure or not, so why not try and get a job while you get your experience? This might be able to replace your volunteer commitment while still getting you the patient exposure you need...
     

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