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Does your state of residence matter??

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by appomattox, May 8, 2002.

  1. appomattox

    appomattox Member

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    Is it better, in the eyes of private schools, to be a state resident of a midwestern state (Indiana, in my case), than one with tons of applicants (NY)? Geographic diversity?

    -A
     
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  3. oldman

    oldman Senior Citizen
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    i don't think it matters too much. some private schools will favor in-state to a certain degree.
     
  4. Jalby

    Jalby I fight crime at day when Batman are sleeping.

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    I think it does matter in some ways. I found it very interesting this year in that the people who had interviews at school like Cornel, also had them at Columbia, NYU, and Mount Sinai. I think schools tend to favor students they think would go to that school, so they tend to interview a lesser candidate from nearbye than a great candidate from far away.
    I know of one person with a 27 MCAT, and goes to school in Boston, and she got an interview from Boston Univeresity. But I don't know anybody else who got that interview.

    And it seemed like at the school I'm prolly going to (USC) most of the people I know of who got interviews there are from the west coast. So I would actually consider changing your status to New York, if you can. I think it would help you get into NYU, Columbia, Cornel, Einstien, and Mount Sinai. It would hurt you at IU, though.
     
  5. Doctora Foxy

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Jalbreakfast:
    [QBI know of one person with a 27 MCAT, and goes to school in Boston, and she got an interview from Boston Univeresity. But I don't know anybody else who got that interview
    [/QB]</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">This girl sounds familiar Jalby....I think I know her! <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />
     
  6. none

    none 1K Member

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    I concur with the nearby interviewing. Med schools know it takes a major committment to make a transcontinental move. That said, the effect of either geographic diversity selection or nearby interviewing would be extremely minimal, if they exist at all.
     
  7. dr. momo

    dr. momo Member

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    i'm not sure if it matters in terms of getting interviews (although it might), but i think it makes a small difference at some places after the interview. new york schools, for example, very often ask you whether you think you could handle living in new york (especially if you are from the west coast). at umich they also really wanted to know what you thought about ann arbor, and if you mention you have family there, or some ties to the place, it seems to help some.

    that being said, i wouldn't choose what i put down as my residence state based upon that. wherever you apply, just make it clear that you have thought about it and you really are interested in the school. :)
     
  8. psyche

    psyche Member

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    Actually, I think in-state admissions preferences at even private medical schools is one of the best-kept secrets of med school admissions. Schools like BU, Tufts, Cornell, Mt. Sinai all claim to give no preference to in-state residents, but the statistics for # of interviews/acceptances listed in MSAR for these schools clearly indicate otherwise.
     
  9. driven

    driven Member

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    Another twist to this question would be... I went to HS and UnderGrad in NY. Then I moved to IL for about a few yrs and did my grad there. I returned to NY last year. Am I a NY or IL resident?

    Which state has better stats on med schools, better chances of getting in as a state resident, etc ? Ny has a million people applying, but more state schools (SUNY). Thoughts, Advice? :confused:
     
  10. jonquille

    jonquille Senior Member

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    I think the most important thing is to determine what the requirements of the STATE schools are. You might decide to go to a state school and save a lot of money. The rules for what constitutes residency varies from state school to state school, so find out so you can plan. I would think that the state you pay taxes to or the state of your permanent legal residence might be one to consider your state of residence.
     

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