soxman

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
May 1, 2006
162
3
Status
Is it true that DOs have a better chance in getting into EM programs because they can aplpy to both MD and DO EM programs?
 

FlemishGiant

One Big @ss Rabbit
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Aug 15, 2002
89
0
Visit site
Status
soxman said:
Is it true that DOs have a better chance in getting into EM programs because they can aplpy to both MD and DO EM programs?
Yes, you can apply to both. DO EM programs are traditionally easier to get into than Allo... But if you go to school, work hard, be a good 3 and 4th year, then you should be just fine...
Good luck
FG
 

Dr.McNinja

Nobel War Prize Winner
Moderator
10+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2006
10,386
7,137
Texas
Status
Attending Physician
Well, they can apply to both, but I don't think that makes it easier for them to get in. There are fewer DOs than MDs in allopathic programs, from what I gather. Most programs would prefer DOs to take Step I to compare them better to MDs, but that isn't a requirement.
 
About the Ads

DrQuinn

My name is Neo
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2000
4,227
16
Wisconsin
Visit site
Status
soxman said:
Is it true that DOs have a better chance in getting into EM programs because they can aplpy to both MD and DO EM programs?
Maybe from the standpoint that the DO EM programs aren't as competitive as the allopathic programs. 1000 applicants versus 50-100 is a big difference. Many DO EM programs will "sign you outside the match." There are some great DO EM programs, and also some ones that are suspect. Don't ask which ones are suspect, as its been asked here many times on SDN and its something that YOU should decide yourself. Regardless, there are both pros and cons with MD and DO EM programs, so you should decide which one you want with your own criteria and not go into one or the other from what you hear on SDN.
Q
 

drsutter

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 17, 2006
19
0
Status
Attending Physician
i've met many competent DO graduating from DO programs. They are fine. Beside, let's admit it, if you have common sense and decent understanding of human anatomy, it doesn't take a genius to be a good ER doctor.
 

Dr.MISHKA D.O.

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 8, 2005
133
2
Standing in the midst of a year long Code.......
Status
Resident [Any Field]
WOW! "Common sense and decent understanding of anatomy." Well gawlee billy bob I guess I'll just pack it up and forgo my four years of training I have left. I'm just an E-R doc, not a real doc like those other magnificent, god-like IM creatures.

Think otherwise, most of the time I have to keep the IM interns from killing my pt before I can get them upstairs. My EM attendings can whip your IM attendings with one frontal hemisphere tied behind their back, so there.

LOL

The Mish
 

EctopicFetus

Keeping it funky enough
15+ Year Member
May 3, 2004
10,765
727
Arizona
Status
Attending Physician
drsutter said:
i've met many competent DO graduating from DO programs. They are fine. Beside, let's admit it, if you have common sense and decent understanding of human anatomy, it doesn't take a genius to be a good ER doctor.
Dont you know it takes a genius to deal with social problems all day.. Go IM.. :thumbdown:

Lets face it the skill sets are different but if you really want to talk intelligence we can make you feel real small on this forum.. Just let us know.
 

DrQuinn

My name is Neo
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2000
4,227
16
Wisconsin
Visit site
Status
ay-yi-yi, such inflammatory responses. sutter ain't a troll, relax guys.

Time to NOT check this thread again.

Q
 

drsutter

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 17, 2006
19
0
Status
Attending Physician
I'm not starting a debate here. I am IM/EM trained and practicing EM only right now since graduated from residency. Perhap you would disagree, but if you know how to maintain airway, start a line, and keep your patient alive, you can be a decent ER doctor. Of course, this is just a very generalized statement. I take lots of pride in my work, but i do feel that IM is a tougher specialty than EM.
 

bulgethetwine

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2005
779
2
Status
drsutter said:
I'm not starting a debate here. I am IM/EM trained and practicing EM only right now since graduated from residency. Perhap you would disagree, but if you know how to maintain airway, start a line, and keep your patient alive, you can be a decent ER doctor. Of course, this is just a very generalized statement. I take lots of pride in my work, but i do feel that IM is a tougher specialty than EM.
Yet again, another guy who gets an olive branch from the forum... then hits us over the head with it!!!!

Maybe the reason why you feel IM is tougher is that you learned more and had better mentors in your EM training vs. the IM components of your residency.

I especially like your comment about "if you know how to maintain airway, start a line, keep patient alive, you can be a decent ER doctor" as if these are binary skills (have them or not) that you can pick up at a weekend course (of course, maybe you stayed at a Holiday Inn last night).
 
About the Ads

ElZorro

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Mar 8, 2006
117
1
Status
Medical Student
DOs should be highly sought after in emergency medical programs. We are better trained to handle HAs, musculoskeletal complaints (ever see back pain in the ED?), and various types of spenoid emergencies. You never know when some dude will require emergent spenobasoid symphasis decompression!

Please note, tongue firmly planted in check.

Honestly, I think EM is perhaps a little easier to match into for DOs (compared to some other fields) because it is a newer speciality therefore doesn't have as old school an attitude. Generally EM PDs want good clinicians, and value people skills, work ethic, and ability to be a good team member over a diploma from an MD school.
 

DrQuinn

My name is Neo
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 6, 2000
4,227
16
Wisconsin
Visit site
Status
ElZorro said:
Honestly, I think EM is perhaps a little easier to match into for DOs (compared to some other fields) because it is a newer speciality therefore doesn't have as old school an attitude. Generally EM PDs want good clinicians, and value people skills, work ethic, and ability to be a good team member over a diploma from an MD school.
You are so on crack. It might be easier in general to geta DO residency, but when it comes to allopathic programs, it is harder for DOs than MDs. hands down. No way around it. You're smokin the good stuff, and I want to tell you to "puff puf give!"
Q
 

kungfufishing

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2003
1,053
6
Visit site
Status
Attending Physician
General Mills Cereals had a great 3 part airway course on their cereal boxes. I had to send in 4 Proofs of Purchase and $3.99 for the difficult airway portion, though.
 

bulgethetwine

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2005
779
2
Status
DrQuinn said:
You are so on crack. It might be easier in general to geta DO residency, but when it comes to allopathic programs, it is harder for DOs than MDs. hands down. No way around it. You're smokin the good stuff, and I want to tell you to "puff puf give!"
Q
Q,

I don't think he meant that the program directors preferred, on the whole, DOs to MD; I think he was suggesting that PDs in EM have a higher proportion of DO-friendly attitudes -- thus more than another specialties consider individuals based on the other intangibles mentioned rather than starting out with a bias against the one who holds a DO.

At least, that's what I think he meant. Otherwise, you're right. He needs to invite us to 420 time.
 

ElZorro

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Mar 8, 2006
117
1
Status
Medical Student
bulgethetwine said:
Q,

I don't think he meant that the program directors preferred, on the whole, DOs to MD; I think he was suggesting that PDs in EM have a higher proportion of DO-friendly attitudes -- thus more than another specialties consider individuals based on the other intangibles mentioned rather than starting out with a bias against the one who holds a DO.

At least, that's what I think he meant. Otherwise, you're right. He needs to invite us to 420 time.
Yeah, trust me I know that MDs have an easier route. I have been so told by a program director just the other day. I was just saying that DO discrimination is less a factor in EM then in some other fields. However, there is no questioning that it exists, and anybody that tells you otherwise is dead wrong.
 

drsutter

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 17, 2006
19
0
Status
Attending Physician
bulgethetwine
That's just my personal opinion having done both residencies. It may be different for other people. But i'm speaking from my own personal experience.
 

Hard24Get

The black sleepymed
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2006
4,768
2
In my skin, when I jump out you jump in!
Status
Resident [Any Field]
So, your EM work only involves tech work and no diagnosistic skills whatsoever? What you describe seems to only fit in the trauma bay, if that.

Also, since this came up because you said DO EMs are "Fine", are you saying DOs are less competent? :confused:


drsutter said:
I'm not starting a debate here. I am IM/EM trained and practicing EM only right now since graduated from residency. Perhap you would disagree, but if you know how to maintain airway, start a line, and keep your patient alive, you can be a decent ER doctor. Of course, this is just a very generalized statement. I take lots of pride in my work, but i do feel that IM is a tougher specialty than EM.
 

Dr.McNinja

Nobel War Prize Winner
Moderator
10+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2006
10,386
7,137
Texas
Status
Attending Physician
IM is tougher because of the hours.
EM is tougher because of the acuity.

IM wants to find the little things.
EM needs to find the big things that kill you only.

Each is separate, and are tougher in their own ways. I don't feel like I want to do IM (even if only because I don't want to round in the mornings). Many IM docs don't want to do EM.
 

Hard24Get

The black sleepymed
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2006
4,768
2
In my skin, when I jump out you jump in!
Status
Resident [Any Field]
drsutter said:
i've met many competent DO graduating from DO programs. They are fine. Beside, let's admit it, if you have common sense and decent understanding of human anatomy, it doesn't take a genius to be a good ER doctor.

Furthermore, I think you have a he** of a nerve disrespecting the EM attendings on this board after seeking their advice. If IM is truly a "tougher specialty", then being trained in it should have kept you from needing the help of the "mere" EM attendings on this board.
You never responded to this in your odontoid fracture thread:
Apollyon said:
Wait a minute - if you are EM/IM trained (5 years), and 3 years out of residency, don't you know the answer to this already?
I don't care who you are, you're rude and I think you owe the attendings here an apology. :mad:
 
About the Ads