Drop CP for a molecular fellowship?

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leu345

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For a hematopathologist to-be, is it wise to drop CP and do a molecular pathology fellowship instead? I am pretty interested in molecular diagnostics and I am 90% academic-oriented. Dropping CP will give me a extra year...............of life as an attending. Having gone through both medical school and graduate school, 6 years of training just appear to be a little too much.
 

pathstudent

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For a hematopathologist to-be, is it wise to drop CP and do a molecular pathology fellowship instead? I am pretty interested in molecular diagnostics and I am 90% academic-oriented. Dropping CP will give me a extra year...............of life as an attending. Having gone through both medical school and graduate school, 6 years of training just appear to be a little too much.

Worth considering. I know a few AP only hemepathologists (and yes they still know coag and platelet defect crap and all that stuff)
 

mlw03

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I speak as an AP-only forensic guy, but I don't think it's a good idea. Agree it sucks doing that extra year, but what if you ever need to work in private practice and they want you to run the flow lab (which you probably can actually do) but you can't because you're not CP trained? For a subspecialty as lab-oriented as hemepath, it seems risky to me to drop CP.
 

2121115

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If you are 100% sure you are going to do academics, then yes it is a good idea. But you will kiss your chances of a private practice job good bye. Just be sure.
 

pathstudent

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I speak as an AP-only forensic guy, but I don't think it's a good idea. Agree it sucks doing that extra year, but what if you ever need to work in private practice and they want you to run the flow lab (which you probably can actually do) but you can't because you're not CP trained? For a subspecialty as lab-oriented as hemepath, it seems risky to me to drop CP.

Yor don't need to be cp trained to oversee a lab. You dont even need to be a pathologist. A phd can direct a flow lab. A heme-onc can direct a flow lab.

Think about it, let's say you do 3 years a t a university and decide to go to a non-university based job. You would be able to sign out surg path, be their hemepath stud, and be well qualified to oversee flow cytometry, coag, hematology and molecular labs. You would be money and far more desirable than your green as grass fresh out of training apcp/surg path trained or even apcp/hemepath pathologist.
 
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Path or bust

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For a hematopathologist to-be, is it wise to drop CP and do a molecular pathology fellowship instead? I am pretty interested in molecular diagnostics and I am 90% academic-oriented. Dropping CP will give me a extra year...............of life as an attending. Having gone through both medical school and graduate school, 6 years of training just appear to be a little too much.

Nobody likes CP, that's a given. Dropping it will hurt you alot and close many doors (not all, but many).
 

sirenomelia

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I havent appreciated that a CP certif was make or break for a job like some have said. I think the knowledge is actually important- the chemistry, heme and blood bank for a general/ lab director job. I have worked with AP/heme boarded people in larger/ academic groups who sign out molecular and who werent CP boarded and to their advantage lacking CP was their angle out of CP call and all the painful blood bank nusiance that comes up.
 

KCShaw

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Unless your first job happens to be CP heavy, being CP boarded is essentially useless in a practical sense -- you might -eventually- have to help cover call or direct a lab, but you'll probably either be re-learning from scratch or depending on those in your department/practice who do it day-to-day. In a marketing yourself for jobs sense, however, it can certainly be useful. In general no boss -wants- to have to re-educate their employees on CP, so they like to have some CP folks around to cross-cover, regardless of what they remember or how often they actually handle CP duties.

As a hemepath, while there's essentially no practical reason to be CP certified, potential employers may still scratch their heads because they're stuck in outdated thinking and forget that they were just looking at a PhD to replace the heme-onc to do the same job they would rather put under your umbrella.

The "problem" is recertification. If you're not sure you'll recert in CP, then there's really no reason to get it in the first place. Unfortunately it's hard to predict the future because the available jobs are limited enough, and some of them state they prefer someone CP boarded. In the days before recertification, you could spend that 1 year, have the board, and never lose it; now you could find yourself regretting that extra year because your job doesn't require it and you don't really want to recert in it, even though there's a -chance- you'll change jobs and "need" it again -- not necessarily for the job per se, but because your employer prefers it.

And of course what some people forget is that just because someone does AP in 3 years doesn't mean they never do any CP training -- only 24 months have to be AP, the other 12 can be AP or CP (and 6 months of that can be research), although programs may require one do a little more AP service work. Which isn't so much relevant to this thread's question, but it has slowly become what I think some people should pursue, such as those focused strictly on FP.
 

Torsed

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It was required that I be AP/CP certified for my private practice job. I would recommend you get CP now during prime time because there will be no going back later.
 

2121115

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If you think the job market is tough for AP/CP grads, just trying doing it without CP.
 
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Well, I'll pipe in, but I am sure it is no suprise. IN GENERAL ( i am not counting CERTAIN/SURE and DEVOTED academics and CERTAIN/SURE fp's and perhaps neuropaths (assuming academic)---it is a mistake to not get ap/cp. I was a partner in a LARGE pp group and your app never hit my desk if you were not ap/cp. nuff said. the np's, derm paths, cyto paths etc were all ap/cp.
 

yaah

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Yep. We would not hire someone without CP training. That may change in the future with different practice models. And for larger groups (which is the increasing trend) it might not be necessary. But you generally need CP in order to take call, cover labs, etc. If you are sure you want an academic life it probably doesn't matter because you will be mostly focused in one lab (i.e. molecular). It all depends what you want out of your career and how many doors you want to close.
 
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