E.M.T.

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Mish550, Jun 4, 2001.

  1. Mish550

    Mish550 Member

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    Does anyone know how long it takes to become a certified E.M.T.?
    Thanks!
     
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  3. Doctor Wyldstyle

    Doctor Wyldstyle Senior Member

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    Some institutions offer an intense two week course. Just do your clinical or ride along, and your set.
     
  4. jf

    jf Senior Member

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    On average, it takes approximately 5-6 months to be an EMT depending on the curriculum and number of times per week classes are. I went twice a week for 6 months and was also required to do 20 hrs of ER rotations.

    It is best to get your EMT through a volunteer fire dept (like myself) or ambulance corp, because it will be free and just taking the course will not be enough. In order to get the most out of the experience you need to respond to calls regularly to actually get hands on experience.

    I am a paramedic, which requires even more training. I volunteer as a firefighter/paramedic, as well as work in the NYC 911 EMS system. I start medical school in august.

    Good luck to all and feel free to ask me questions.
     
  5. Mish550

    Mish550 Member

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    One of you said two weeks and another is saying six months....does anyone else know how long it usually takes??
     
  6. BADunning

    BADunning Member

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    It varies a lot from state to state. In Tennessee the classes are taught through the community college system. The time required for EMT is two semesters. I don't know what other states may require.
     
  7. Hamster

    Hamster Member

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    In NC it was a once-a-week course, about four hours long that lasted from May through August... I took the state exam, which was given several times through out the year, in september.
    Definitely check with your state's requirements because they are not all the same.
     
  8. Pegasus

    Pegasus Senior Member

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    I am from NC and I agree with Hamster.

    I took a 3 month course at a CC 2 days/week for 4 hours. After that took the state exam. I didnt think the course was that hard nor did it take alot of time, but I did have to study considering I had no Anatomy or any other medical course at the time.

    I also took the course being full time at school and part time at work, so it isnt that much of a time constraint if you can work your schedule around it.

    We also had to do 2 nights of 8 hours in the ER.
     
  9. pcl

    pcl Senior Member

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    My younger brother is finishing up right now and it was a few times a week for the last six months. He had clinicals & ride alongs too. This is in MI & he's doing it through a CC.
     
  10. rdennisjr

    rdennisjr SDN Super Moderator
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    Mish:
    All of the above answers are correct, but also a bit confusing. To receive the EMT-Basic registration, you must complete a minimum of 110 hours of classroom instruction, 10 hours (minimum again) of ER/Ride along time, and pass the NREMT-B test. How you attain those 110 hours depends on where you take the course - any where from the two week super-intensive, (but probably won't remember as much in my opinion,) to the 6 month or so courses. Classes tend to be available at community colleges, fire departments, rarely at hospitals, etc. Oh - you must also take either a Red Cross or AHA Basic Life Support (CPR +) course prior to the EMT-B class beginning typically - usually 2 nights.
    :D
     
  11. 12R34Y

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    My EMT course was 4 weeks long and it was everyday M-F for 6-8 hours during the summer. I think it is just very dependant on the program and what time of year you take it.

    I'm also a paramedic and feel free to ask any questions you have.

    later
     
  12. mpp

    mpp SDN Moderator
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    My EMT course (in Alaska) was 125 classroom hours and then you had to pass the State and/or National practical and written exams. Included in the 125 hours was the entire CPR/Basic Life Support program. The practical exam consisted of six separate stations such applying a traction splint and using an AED to defibrillate a patient. The written exam (both state and national) were 150-question multiple choice examinations.
     
  13. EricCSU

    EricCSU Senior Member

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    I wish my course was only 110 hours. I'm taking an EMT-B course right now and it is 6-10pm M-R for 10 weeks plus an 8 hr Saturday. Add it up and it is 168 hours plus 20 hours (10 ER, 5 Ambulance, 5 Fire) clinicals. Don't get me wrong, it is a fun class, but it is starting to be time-consuming.

    Eric
     
  14. coop

    coop Senior Member

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    you should check it out for your state, because state laws vary on the subject. I run with a unit on my undergrad campus and we are all Emergency First Responders (EFR) because maryland state law doesn't allow EMTs to retain their certification unless they run with an ambulence. EFR is most of the EMT training, but without anything pertaining to an ambulence. It's a 60 hour course instead of 110.
     
  15. Krazed_Medic

    Krazed_Medic Registered Banned User

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    everyone is pretty much right, it varies from place to place. You can take it at fire dept, comm. college, vo-techs, etc. I think MOST states require you take the National Registry test. In my opinion, anyone in the medical field should take the EMT-Basic course. If nothing else, you might get a little patient contact, and it's fun. :D :cool: :p
     

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