noshie

Don't judge!
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I am applying for EM residencies during the next cycle... So far, I have written the first draft of my EM personal statement. I would really love to have someone that has experience in the EM field read it and give some brutal feedback on it (or any editing that you would deem necessary). I am aiming to finish most of it up by mid January so I can send it for my deans letter. Any awesome takers? :)
 

Birdstrike

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Though it's tempting to say, "I'd love to help out. PM it to me, I'll tell you what I think, and maybe even offer some editorial advice," that would ultimately defeat the purpose of your personal statement being "personal."

The best way is to write a rough draft in your own words, from the heart and show it to your family, friends and personal mentors. Try the doctors/residents you shadowed, or got recommendations from. Try your personal doctor or one you happen to know. They'll all have a bit of a different viewpoint and may offer very different feedback. That way, you can write your final draft based on the feedback you think was best. With your final draft I can't tell you how important it is to eliminate basic, very easy to miss typos. Read your own writing aloud over and over again to pick these out. Because if you didn't notice 'em when you wrote 'em, you wont see them when you read them in your head. Spell check won't always pick up on the difference between "it's" and "its," "too" and "to" or "hear" and "here." Before you submit your final, have multiple people read over the final draft again, looking for these minor errors. They're easy to miss, but detract from what might otherwise be a great write up.

I don't at all consider myself a "writer," because I'm not, but recently I've found out if you really take the time to distill what your thoughts are, read, re-read and proofread as well as get good feedback from others, you can get some pretty good results. The key is to really think about what you want to say, and refuse to quit until it sounds perfect to you read aloud.

Somehow, this guy managed to get one of his SDN EM posts to get cross posted on KevinMD and become the 6th most popular post on that site out of 2500 posts in 2013.

For me, I suppose it means nothing more than I've "put lipstick on a pig and made a few people think they're looking at a peacock," because I'm still just some random unimportant-guy posting stuff on the internet without a real name. But for you, I suppose it might prove that, "You can do it."


http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2013/12/10-popular-kevinmd-posts-2013.html


PS- If that's your real picture as your avatar, take it down, only because there are residency admissions people that read this board, and you don't want them to think your personal statement was written collectively by SDN EM.
 
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noshie

noshie

Don't judge!
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Nice article, very well written! Also, great editing advice! I am actually a pretty decent writer. I've edited hundreds of personal statements from SDNers that are applying to med school in the last five years. I wrote mine already and there are basically no gross spelling or grammatical errors, but I want to make sure it is humble and comes off as a good read by someone that doesn't know me. Such as it will be when someone from the program reads it... Thank you!
 

tkim

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Looking back at all the personal statements I've written for med school and residency apps, I've realized that a lot of it was fluffery. That pithy, somewhat witty mixture that's supposed to make you 'stand out' from a pile of other personal statements, but in reality reads like every other personal statement. If I were to go back and write again, I wouldn't open with an attention-getting 'hook' or some witty anecdote. I'd simply write about what I'm like and why I like EM and what I like to do when I'm not doing EM. If you're worried about not sounding humble enough, you've got a problem.