Zuerst

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I think primary care means the first point of contact for patients to the health care system so family doctor would fall into that category. I also under the impression that primary care also means sustained long term care???

So would emergency medicine or ED fall under primary care as well?

In other words, I'm just wondering if volunteering in the ER could be used as an evidence of my interest in primary care.
 

joanofarc0907

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Zuerst said:
I think primary care means the first point of contact for patients to the health care system so family doctor would fall into that category. I also under the impression that primary care also means sustained long term care???

So would emergency medicine or ED fall under primary care as well?
we went over this in another thread...primary care vs. patient care...do a search
 

Sporky

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Zuerst said:
I think primary care means the first point of contact for patients to the health care system so family doctor would fall into that category. I also under the impression that primary care also means sustained long term care???

So would emergency medicine or ED fall under primary care as well?
Regarding an application? Emegergency Medicine is now a specialty in its own right. I think either George Washington or U of MD has a very good program in this area. Dr. Azmy Iskander used to head up one of them. Anyway, there is also a crisis of personnel in this area because nobody wants to enter into it and face a lawsuit from an alcoholic transvestite who needs surgery to remove a blunt object from his/her rectum, or the hopped up meth addict who injected peroxide instead of saline into his eyes so they wouldn't look so red.

(No, I'm not making these up - yes, I wish I were)
 
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Zuerst

Zuerst

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Sporky said:
Regarding an application? Emegergency Medicine is now a specialty in its own right. I think either George Washington or U of MD has a very good program in this area. Dr. Azmy Iskander used to head up one of them. Anyway, there is also a crisis of personnel in this area because nobody wants to enter into it and face a lawsuit from an alcoholic transvestite who needs surgery to remove a blunt object from his/her rectum, or the hopped up meth addict who injected peroxide instead of saline into his eyes so they wouldn't look so red.

(No, I'm not making these up - yes, I wish I were)
I'm just wondering if volunteering in the ER could be used as an evidence of my interest in primary care.
 

SoCuteMD

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Sporky said:
Regarding an application? Emegergency Medicine is now a specialty in its own right. I think either George Washington or U of MD has a very good program in this area. Dr. Azmy Iskander used to head up one of them. Anyway, there is also a crisis of personnel in this area because nobody wants to enter into it and face a lawsuit from an alcoholic transvestite who needs surgery to remove a blunt object from his/her rectum, or the hopped up meth addict who injected peroxide instead of saline into his eyes so they wouldn't look so red.

(No, I'm not making these up - yes, I wish I were)
Yeah, I don't think that one of the more competitive specialties in the match is quite in "crisis" yet.
 

deuist

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Sporky said:
there is also a crisis of personnel in this area because nobody wants to enter into it
Nobody wants to go into EM?? Where are you hearing this? EM is a moderately competitive specialty (see the NRMP). Applicants typically need a 220 on the USMLE and should graduate in the top half of their class to be considered competitive.
 

MossPoh

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Sporky said:
Regarding an application? Emegergency Medicine is now a specialty in its own right. I think either George Washington or U of MD has a very good program in this area. Dr. Azmy Iskander used to head up one of them. Anyway, there is also a crisis of personnel in this area because nobody wants to enter into it and face a lawsuit from an alcoholic transvestite who needs surgery to remove a blunt object from his/her rectum, or the hopped up meth addict who injected peroxide instead of saline into his eyes so they wouldn't look so red.

(No, I'm not making these up - yes, I wish I were)
The tranny thing or uh.....other very explorative people seemed to come into the hospitals in south florida with that stuff a lot. As in at least once every other day someone gets somethign stuck there....or if they were very crazy they would jam stuff in other places not intended. Made for good stories from my rents though....how one of the docs asked if a guy wanted the vibrator out or to just change the batteries for him...not sure that'd fly now a days or not.
 

8744

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Sporky said:
Regarding an application? Emegergency Medicine is now a specialty in its own right. I think either George Washington or U of MD has a very good program in this area. Dr. Azmy Iskander used to head up one of them. Anyway, there is also a crisis of personnel in this area because nobody wants to enter into it and face a lawsuit from an alcoholic transvestite who needs surgery to remove a blunt object from his/her rectum, or the hopped up meth addict who injected peroxide instead of saline into his eyes so they wouldn't look so red.

(No, I'm not making these up - yes, I wish I were)
Those aren't the kind of lawsuits anybody worries about. The kind of thing that will bite you in the rear is, for example, is ignoring ancillary findings on tests while focusing on the chief complaint.

There are 125 or so Emergency Medicine residency programs in the United States and all of them are very competitive. There is a "crisis" of personnel because the number of board-certified EM physicians is not enough to meet the demand. This may be a crisis for the health care system but is not a crisis for EM physicians who have the highest salaries of any specialty that only requires a three-year residency.

P. Bear, MD
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lilnoelle

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In my state (Kansas), EM is considered primary care. Check into what your state loan repayment program considers primary care. That should answer your question.
 

Haemulon

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For what its worth, I have not heard of EM talked about as primary care. Usually that is more IM, FP, and Peds. OB/Gyn sometimes.
 

notdeadyet

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Haemulon said:
For what its worth, I have not heard of EM talked about as primary care. Usually that is more IM, FP, and Peds. OB/Gyn sometimes.
And sometimes Psych. But I don't think EM qualifies as primary care by any yardstick I've read.
 

Haemulon

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notdeadyet said:
And sometimes Psych. But I don't think EM qualifies as primary care by any yardstick I've read.
Agreed.
 

jillibean

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FWIW, this program considers EM and Ob/gyn to be primary care (see toward the bottom under application requirements):

http://sph.berkeley.edu/degrees/degreeprog/prevmed.htm

"Have completed a residency in primary care field (medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, or emergency medicine) at least one year of which must have been in an accredited residency program in the United States or Canada"
 

jillibean

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notdeadyet said:
And sometimes Psych. But I don't think EM qualifies as primary care by any yardstick I've read.

EM docs deal with a super broad range of issues, age groups, etc. so in a sense they are not "specialists" it is almost like acute FM (without the continuity with your patients.) Also I think some people see it as "primary care" for many people who have no insurance and misuse the system.
 

Haemulon

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jillibean said:
EM docs deal with a super broad range of issues, age groups, etc. so in a sense they are not "specialists" it is almost like acute FM (without the continuity with your patients.) Also I think some people see it as "primary care" for many people who have no insurance and misuse the system.
Granted, they perform many primary care functions. So your point is taken. But EM is definitely a specialty in and of itsself as well, performing treatment and evaluation that would be less competantly/efficiently performed by other specialties. EM Docs are the front-liners, the hard core. But I think of them more for for trauma and serious acute illness then general primary care diagnosticians.
 
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