Johnisit1234

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Emory or Northwestern? I feel that both schools are similar in terms of reputation, no?
What do all of you think?
 
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CalBeE

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Emory has much stronger resource in Public Health

Northwestern has much stronger resource in Business and Law

Emory is letter-graded, while Northwestern is P/F
 

meanderson

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I'd go to emory....but for reasons other than rep. From that standpoint, I don't think there is much difference.
 

BerkeleyPremed

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I would go with Northwestern all the way. Chicago is a GREAT city with lots to offer...I wouldn't consider Northwestern in the same league as HMS, JHU, Penn, Columbia, UCSF, etc...but I think it definitely has an edge over Emory (academically). I also think Chicago is a MUCH better place to live in for 4 years than Atlanta, Georgia...but I'm sure a proud southerner would disagree with me. Well, whichever one you choose...best of luck to you!

P.S.: No offense to DW or any other Emoroids that may read this post. :)
 

meanderson

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Originally posted by BerkeleyPremed
but I think it definitely has an edge over Emory (academically).

That's an ignorant statement....especially the definitely part. Emory is ranked higher, has a higher avg gpa, the same residency director rating, and a higher peer assessment rating. NW has the higher avg mcat. All of these measures are very close, however, so I wouldn't say that Emory definitely has an edge over NW. Their reputations are pretty identical. All the schools ranked #13-24 or so are very close in terms of reputation. Would you care to explain what metric you are using to say that NW definitely has an edge over emory academically?
 

Taleof50

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I agree with meanderson in that your statement that Emory is less academically is a bit extreme. I was accepted to both med schools as well, but will most likely choose Emory because of Atlanta. Academically and reputation-wise, the universities are more or less similar. Both have the same 'amount' of name recognition in the medical field. And at the same time, each school offers different options for students. P/F vs. letter grades, for example. Students may prefer one or the other.
I personally would say that the schools are the same, except for those unique tidbits that make them their own school. To say that NU is better academically is just ignorant. No offense.
 

SunnyS81

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Emory vs Northwestern is close, but determing the quality of the school will come down to one thing: what region of the country you want to be in. Talk to any 4th year at any med school (maybe HMS and JHU excluded) and you'll see that it is a lot easier to get interviews for residency at places in the region of the country you go to med school in especially in more competitive specialties (the exception is if your medical school happens to have one of the top departments in the specialty you want to match in). I think it is a function of regional conferences and collaberations between medical centers. So if you want to be in the midwest go to Northwestern, or if you want to be in the south go to Emory. I don't mean to indicate that it is impossible to match in other regions, but if you want to do your residency in chicago, then northwestern would be a better choice.

P/F vs letter grade is pretty huge. I'm a big advocate of P/F. It take a lot of the load off. Cost of living in Chicago is higher I think (reason I decided not to interview there after getting into Michigan and Emory). Chicago is a nicer city, but does weather bother you at all?

Do you want an urban hospital or one of the model hospitals in the US (yes, northwestern's hospital is the model for how a hospital should operate.....it is also the most profitable hospital in the country, last I read).

Ultimately, ignore all the stats that meanderson spewed out. Most people would split the rankings into several tiers. First are those ranked 1-5. Second is 6-12. Third, 12-30. Fourth, 31-50. Any argument of Emory being better or northwestern being better is negligible. You're going to be spending a lot of money and four years of your life in med school, pick the place you like best.
 
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Wrigleyville

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I prefered the P/F to the letter grades, Chicago over Atlanta, and NMH over Grady. Chicago probably has a higher cost of living than Atlanta, but you should factor in that you'll neither need nor want a car if you live in downtown Chicago. That is a huge expense that you won't be paying that you would absolutely have to pay if you lived in Atlanta.

Northwestern Medical School also has a number of collaborative programs with the other graduate schools located right next door. As a medical student, you can take law or business classes for free. The law and business schools are highly rated, with Kellogg being arguably the top b-school in the country. I just finished up a health industries management class myself, so the classes are readily available to anyone who want to take advantage of them.
 

StrngoutAS

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Exactly how feasible is it to take business classes in addition to the regular medical school curriculum? The chance to get in a few classes or work towards your MBA seems like such an opportunity given the fact that classes are free and it's so highly rated.

In other words, Wrigley, do you know of many other people who are trying to do MD/MBA at NU?
 

J33

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Originally posted by StrngoutAS
Exactly how feasible is it to take business classes in addition to the regular medical school curriculum? The chance to get in a few classes or work towards your MBA seems like such an opportunity given the fact that classes are free and it's so highly rated.

In other words, Wrigley, do you know of many other people who are trying to do MD/MBA at NU?

I second this question. I am very interested in the answer!
 

BerkeleyPremed

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Originally posted by meanderson
That's an ignorant statement....especially the definitely part. Emory is ranked higher, has a higher avg gpa, the same residency director rating, and a higher peer assessment rating. NW has the higher avg mcat. All of these measures are very close, however, so I wouldn't say that Emory definitely has an edge over NW. Their reputations are pretty identical. All the schools ranked #13-24 or so are very close in terms of reputation. Would you care to explain what metric you are using to say that NW definitely has an edge over emory academically?

I stand corrected...if Emory is ranked higher for all the criteria you mentioned (higher avg GPA, higher peer assessment rank, etc)...then Emory is probably a bit better academically. However, I still fully stand behind my endorsement of Northwestern simply because it offers MORE academic opportunities. You get to take advantage of classes in one of the top business school in the country (Northwesern-Kellogg) and you can even sign up for classes in Northwestern's law school (which also ranked in the top 20 among law school). I think the only reason I thought Northwestern was ranked higher than Emory for med school was because I was confusing UNDERGRAD rankings with MEDICAL school rankings...sorry about that. For undergrad, Northwestern is ranked many spots ahead of Emory (and my alma mater to be...Berkeley).

In addition, I think being in downtown Chicago for 4 years of med school is a lot better than being in Atlanta, Georgia. I definitely think it's worth the increased cost of living. Well, didn't mean to ruffle your feathers there...take care and have a good one.
 

Wrigleyville

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It is very feasible to take classes, especially business classes. Kellogg offers a myriad of evening classes all year round to serve people who want to get their MBA while also working full-time. Investment bankers and other professionals will take a few classes at a time to work toward their MBA without having to take a couple of years off of work. These classes are the ones that most med students sign up for, since they don't conflict with any other classes you might be taking. It is no problem to fit them in with your usual medical school work.

All you have to do in order to take these classes is sign up for them. This involves walking into the dean's office, writing down the course number on a sheet of paper, and signing your name. That's it. Kellogg knows that the medical students are top-notch students, and can easily handle the coursework. They don't require any red tape, essays, GMATs or anything in order to take classes.

Later on, if you decide you want to do the integrated MD/MBA program (usually a 4.5 year program), you can apply these classes toward your MBA from Kellogg. Four or five people choose to do the program every year. Acceptance into the program is pretty much pro-forma, although you would have to take the GMAT if you want to officially do the program.

You apply after your 2nd year at school, and take a couple of quarters off to take business classes full-time. Generally this is done after your required clerkships, but before your elective clerkships (so between the 3rd and 4th year).

Even if you don't actually want to finish your MBA, the business school classes are a valuable addition to your medical school education. The Health Industries Management class I just finished taught us how the health care system works: Medicare, Medicaid, the differences between types of health plans, compensation and reimbursement for physicians, health care technology, methods of quality control, etc. Basically things you ought to know as a physician. I found it quite helpful.

Let me know if you have any other questions.
 

meanderson

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Originally posted by SunnyS81
Ultimately, ignore all the stats that meanderson spewed out. Most people would split the rankings into several tiers. First are those ranked 1-5. Second is 6-12. Third, 12-30. .

Well that's exactly what I said, except I used 13-24 as one tier rather than 12-30. Common sense says that Emory and NW differ little if any in rep. I was just 'spewing out' numbers to show that there is no objective basis for arguing NW > Emory.
 

meanderson

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Originally posted by BerkeleyPremed
I stand corrected...if Emory is ranked higher for all the criteria you mentioned (higher avg GPA, higher peer assessment rank, etc)...then Emory is probably a bit better academically. However, I still fully stand behind my endorsement of Northwestern simply because it offers MORE academic opportunities. You get to take advantage of classes in one of the top business school in the country (Northwesern-Kellogg) and you can even sign up for classes in Northwestern's law school (which also ranked in the top 20 among law school).

But emory has lots of opportunities to. They just happen to be different than Northwestern, mainly from a public health perspective. It just all depends on what you are looking for. I'm not the least bit interested in enrolling in on law or business classes, so this would be a non-issue for me.
 

BerkeleyPremed

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Originally posted by meanderson
But emory has lots of opportunities to. They just happen to be different than Northwestern, mainly from a public health perspective. It just all depends on what you are looking for. I'm not the least bit interested in enrolling in on law or business classes, so this would be a non-issue for me.

I know Emory is a good school. I'm just saying that I would prefer NU if I were forced to choose between these two great institutions. Really, one can't go wrong with these two. In addition, you should realize that living in Atlanta, Georgia is a huge reason for me to not choose that school. The only thing that makes up for it is that the Center for Disease Control is right there...practically across the street. To me, location and quality of life is a huge part of the decision...and Chicago just seems like a much more vibrant and multicultural place to live in (as compared to Atlanta, Georgia).
 

VCMM414

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Originally posted by BerkeleyPremed
... In addition, you should realize that living in Atlanta, Georgia is a huge reason for me to not choose that school. The only thing that makes up for it is that the Center for Disease Control is right there...practically across the street. To me, location and quality of life is a huge part of the decision...and Chicago just seems like a much more vibrant and multicultural place to live in (as compared to Atlanta, Georgia).

It's funny how people refer to Atlanta as "Atlanta, Georgia." Do most people not know where Atlanta is?

Why not "Chicago, Illinois," "San Francisco, California" or "New York, New York?"

Or do you simply stress Georgia so much because you can't stand the idea of living in the south?
 

Johnisit1234

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i agree. i mean, come on, it's not like Atlanta is some podunk town in the middle of no where. Atlanta, Georgia. Thanks for the heads up! i thought it was in kansas. but of course, i knew where chicago was since it's chicago and not "atlanta, georgia."

Atlanta is a good city - maybe not for everyone, but a good city, nonetheless. people need to realize that culturally, atlanta is a cool place to be. and the south is not horrible to live in. the mild winters can attest to that! and plus, one inch of snow will get you out of class!
 

BerkeleyPremed

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Originally posted by Johnisit1234
i agree. i mean, come on, it's not like Atlanta is some podunk town in the middle of no where. Atlanta, Georgia. Thanks for the heads up! i thought it was in kansas. but of course, i knew where chicago was since it's chicago and not "atlanta, georgia."

Atlanta is a good city - maybe not for everyone, but a good city, nonetheless. people need to realize that culturally, atlanta is a cool place to be. and the south is not horrible to live in. the mild winters can attest to that! and plus, one inch of snow will get you out of class!

Uh...I think telling people that, "Culturally, Atlanta is a cool place to be" is a hard sell. I doubt anyone would honestly believe that Atlanta is anywhere near as diverse and vibrant as Chicago, New York, or San Franisco. "Atlanta is a good city!"....uhhh..sure, whatever you say.

My vote still goes to Northwestern.
 

BerkeleyPremed

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Originally posted by VCMM414
It's funny how people refer to Atlanta as "Atlanta, Georgia." Do most people not know where Atlanta is?

Why not "Chicago, Illinois," "San Francisco, California" or "New York, New York?"

Or do you simply stress Georgia so much because you can't stand the idea of living in the south?

You nailed it on the head. I simply do not EVER want to live in the south...and I've been all throughout the south...especially Texas (Irving, Dallas Fort Worth, Houston, Austin, etc). I would rather sever one of my own limbs with a butterknife than spend more than 2 weeks in any given city in the south...especially the "deep south"...aka...Georgia...oops...sorry..."Gowga!"**
 

Taleof50

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Wow, that's a bit extreme. I guess you're entitled to your opinion. I'm sure most Atlantans are glad that you're not there.
 

TheFlash

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Atlanta is one of the fastest growing cities in the country. It's plenty diverse and has a vibrant crowd of young professionals. The weather is great, and the people are ultra-friendly. Berkeley, you seem to like passing opinions on stuff you have no clue about. How can you judge a place if you've never been there? Stereotypes you've heard account for nothing.
 

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Here's a nice little article from the AJC about the backwards, deep-south state of Georgia.....btw, these people aren't moving into Valdosta, Macon, or Columbus....this is basically all Atlanta.



"State adds 500,000 people in 3 years, census says
Rate of increase puts Georgia fourth in growth

By JEFFRY SCOTT
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 03/09/04


Georgia's population has grown by about half a million people in the past three years, making the state the fourth fastest-growing in the nation behind California, Texas and Florida, the U.S. Census Bureau says.

That population boom contributes to traffic and strains water supplies, but there's also a good economic indicator hidden in the big increase of Georgia residents, said a state demographer.

Census figures released today show the age group driving Georgia's population boom are people 44 and younger.

And that means they came here to work, said Robert Giacomini of the Georgia Office of Planning and Budget.

"Job growth here has been stronger than in many other states," Giacomini said. "Atlanta especially has become a magnet because of the economic potential."

Although many of the new residents are from smaller cities in other Southern states, said Giacomini, about half of them come from other countries.

"That's a big change," said the statistician. "I would estimate that in 1990, only 20 percent of Georgia's migration were internationals."

Georgia, with 8,684,715 people, is now the ninth most populous state, according to the census.

The U.S. population is 290,809,777. The most populous state is California with 35.484,453 people; the least populous is Wyoming with 501,242.

Georgia has the fifth fastest-growing population of children younger than 5; the seventh fastest-growing population of children ages 5 to 13; and the ninth fastest-growing population between ages 14 and 17.

Georgia ranks 31st in the growth of the number of people 18 to 24, but fourth in growth of those 15 to 44.

Georgia ranks No. 6 in growth of population of people 65 and older.

In the three-year period measured by the census, 41,226 retirement age people moved to the state"
 

OldLady

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I grew up in Chicago....Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubbies...I love the city and would love to get into NU off the waitlist so pick Emory! Just Kidding.

But, my brother now lives in Atlanta and loves it. Atlanta is a vibrant city- the people are friendly, it is ethnically diverse and there are plenty of things to do. The weather is also very mild and pleasant. I don't think you will feel some strange lack of culture for being in the "South." Lots of people live there from all over. The music scene in Atlanta is great, they are crazy about their sports teams, and the CDC is right there.

You can't go wrong, but don't judge Atlanta by what SDNers say, go visit and compare yourself.
 

meanderson

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Originally posted by BerkeleyPremed
Uh...I think telling people that, "Culturally, Atlanta is a cool place to be" is a hard sell. I doubt anyone would honestly believe that Atlanta is anywhere near as diverse and vibrant as Chicago, New York, or San Franisco. "Atlanta is a good city!"....uhhh..sure, whatever you say.

My vote still goes to Northwestern.

I hear this "vibrant and diverse" phrase a lot when referring to cities, but what does it really mean? I don't want to go to the real 'theatre'. Nor do I want to go to 'exhibitions' by famous artists. I do love eating out and the variety of great restaurants in a city like NY would be a plus, but as a med student how often am I going to be able to afford such restaurants? Perhaps some of the people in here who claim that they are thankful for being in such "vibrant" cities actually do go to the theatre often and love going to gallery premieres, but I suspect that many go to the cinaplex 5x more than the theatre, and eat at Boston Market more often than whatever restaurant was given a great review in the Village voice.

It's amazing how much of this country is the same now. The same urban sprawl is everywhere. With the possible exception of *parts* of NY and SF, the only really unique places in this country now are some of the really rural parts.

If you're talking about diversity amongst the people in a city, it's hard to beat some southern cities. Of course Atlanta has a huge black population, but the asian population there is exploding. And I know diversity amongst people isn't measured strictly by ethnic ratios, but Atlanta is a city of several million people.......there will be plenty who fall into all different kinds of social/political/lifestyle categories.
 
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