How much paid time off do get as an employed dentist?


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monkeykey

2+ Year Member
May 14, 2017
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Pre-Dental
Hi I am very curious as to what is the industry standard for a dentist who is not a practice owner and is simply employed for time off both paid and unpaid? Do corporations offer this at all? Any new grads care to chime in? How many days do most dentists work a year?
 

2TH MVR

Orthodontist
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Aug 3, 2017
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North Scottsdale, Arizona
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Same. No PTO. One floating paid day. That's it. No vacation pay. No raises. We have a 401K, but it is not matched by the Corp.
On the positive side. Paid malpractice. Paid sick days (I've accrued quite a few days since I never call in sick lol). Health benefits are cheap. Free CE.
If I want a raise .... I just need to work harder. Start more patients. The bonuses are quite good.

Can't speak for other dental corps.

Private practice. You PAY for everything as the practice owner.
 
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monkeykey

2+ Year Member
May 14, 2017
47
9
Status
Pre-Dental
Same. No PTO. One floating paid day. That's it. No vacation pay. No raises. We have a 401K, but it is not matched by the Corp.
On the positive side. Paid malpractice. Paid sick days (I've accrued quite a few days since I never call in sick lol). Health benefits are cheap. Free CE.
If I want a raise .... I just need to work harder. Start more patients. The bonuses are quite good.

Can't speak for other dental corps.

Private practice. You PAY for everything as the practice owner.
Do corporations offer bonuses as part of your salary? How much of an average dentists salary is paid out through bonuses? Like 5-10 %?
 

2TH MVR

Orthodontist
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Aug 3, 2017
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North Scottsdale, Arizona
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Do corporations offer bonuses as part of your salary? How much of an average dentists salary is paid out through bonuses? Like 5-10 %?
Every Corp situation is a little different. My posts are representative of a single Corp I work for. We are employees of the Corp. We have no ownership in the Corp entity. I've spoken to other dentists who have worked at a few different Corps. Dentists and specialists at my Corp get a daily minimum and bonuses. I personally like this arrangement since regardless if the day is slow ... I still get paid. I have no interest in partial ownership in the Corp. As for the %. For my situation ... it's simple. I get bonuses on ortho starts. I also get a little $ for upcharges: gold, clear braces. As for the GPs. It's more complicated. Their bonuses depends on the reimbursements of the procedures. Depends on if the procedure is access, HMO, PPO, FFS, Cash, etc. etc. I hear the GPs griping alot if their schedule is full of low paying Access (medicaid) patients.
As I've stated in every post re: Dent Corp. As a young dentist .... I would not make Corp Dentistry a career choice. It's fine as an adjunct to a private practice, a temp situation for a new grad, or an older dentist wishing for a simpler life (Me).
 

allDAT

7+ Year Member
Mar 10, 2011
78
17
Status
Dentist
Do corporations offer bonuses as part of your salary? How much of an average dentists salary is paid out through bonuses? Like 5-10 %?
Most places that have a daily base drop the base after 3-9 months, so 100% of a dentist's compensation is based on adjusted production or collections.

For those jobs that don't drop the base, the associate is usually not depending on it to make their living - or at least you shouldn't be. If you're dependent on the base, the practice probably doesn't need an associate or the associate needs help closing cases (there's nothing wrong with that).
 

allDAT

7+ Year Member
Mar 10, 2011
78
17
Status
Dentist
Hi I am very curious as to what is the industry standard for a dentist who is not a practice owner and is simply employed for time off both paid and unpaid? Do corporations offer this at all? Any new grads care to chime in? How many days do most dentists work a year?
To answer to OPs question, most private practices and small DSOs offer no PTO for associate dentists. Some larger corps may offer some PTO, but when I worked for one of the larger ones, I was offered zero days of PTO.

In a community clinic/public health job, you may find as much as 2-6 weeks of PTO, where the amount of PTO you have access to increases as you stay longer.
 

2TH MVR

Orthodontist
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2+ Year Member
Aug 3, 2017
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North Scottsdale, Arizona
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Dentist
I think it goes without saying that most people would take more money. Based on the assumptions that said job is available and the work environment is healthy. Also depends on what stage you are in your life. When you're young ... you have to make bank and pay off your loans. As you get older .... more time off becomes valuable whether paid for or not.
 

Frychicken

2+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2014
166
319
Status
Dentist
Yea, but community clinics usually don't pay much.
I think it’s all about work-life balance and finding the best situation for yourself and your family. At the end of the day, money isn’t everything and it’s not a competition to see who makes the most money.
 

TanMan

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Jul 21, 2004
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I think it’s all about work-life balance and finding the best situation for yourself and your family. At the end of the day, money isn’t everything and it’s not a competition to see who makes the most money.
It's not about who makes the most money but about who can exit the industry when they have enough money to do so. Vacations make me realize that life's too short to work until you die and as much as I like dentistry, I'd rather be on a lifelong vacation than have a lifetime of working. Unfortunately, being on a lifelong vacation requires me to have a lot of money.
 
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Frychicken

2+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2014
166
319
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Dentist
It's not about who makes the most money but about who can exit the industry when they have enough money to do so. Vacations make me realize that life's too short to work until you die and as much as I like dentistry, I'd rather be on a lifelong vacation than have a lifetime of working. Unfortunately, being on a lifelong vacation requires me to have a lot of money.
We all had different reasons of pursuing dentistry. Sorry to hear that yours was to make enough money to “exit the industry”.

No judgment here, wish you the best on that goal.
 

2TH MVR

Orthodontist
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2+ Year Member
Aug 3, 2017
1,054
1,948
North Scottsdale, Arizona
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Dentist
I think it’s all about work-life balance and finding the best situation for yourself and your family. At the end of the day, money isn’t everything and it’s not a competition to see who makes the most money.
It's not about who makes the most money but about who can exit the industry when they have enough money to do so. Vacations make me realize that life's too short to work until you die and as much as I like dentistry, I'd rather be on a lifelong vacation than have a lifetime of working. Unfortunately, being on a lifelong vacation requires me to have a lot of money.
As we all know ... there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to how much money do we really need. Everyone's financial situations are uniquely different. I do believe that working hard early on will provide more options later in life. The opposite of that is losing out on some of life's most precious moments with our young kids. It's not an easy work-life balance. If I recall ... @TanMan is not married and has plenty of girlfriends and guns :D so his needs and goals are going to be quite different to that of a dentist raising a young family.