EMT, would that help?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by relentless11, Apr 26, 2001.

  1. relentless11

    relentless11 Going broke and loving it
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2001
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    8
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hey everyone. I have a question for all you guys. I have the opportunity to be trained as EMT-1. Which to my understanding would allow me to be a paramedic?

    If thats the case, i would like some couseling on if i should do this or not. I obviously would LOVE to do it. I mean come on, as kids, we've all wanted to drive or atleast get a ride on an ambulance=P.

    On another note, its also a great experience, it clearly counts as some sort of clinical experience, i'll get paid, and just be fun=).

    However, i am a biochemistry major. I will be taking Physical Chemistry next year, along with my final set of science classes. My GPA is at the point of where, every A will count. I plan to apply next fall. My predicament is that i would like to have the EMT thing on my application. Plus work as an EMT while waiting for the med school to reply.

    So what would any of you do in my shoes?
     
  2. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Nanon

    Nanon An urban myth.

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2000
    Messages:
    1,740
    Likes Received:
    16
    Do the EMT thing, if time permits. Most community colleges (at least in my area) have an intensive summer course, if you won't have time in the fall.

    By the way, an EMT I is not the same thing as a paramedic. In CA, a paramedic is (I think) required to complete almost two years of training, including working as an EMT I for 6 months. Paramedics are trained to do invasive procedures and administer drugs. In contrast, an EMT I far more limited in the care that they can give. For instance, an EMT I is licenced to give advanced basic care to people... splinting, CPR, shock, non-invasive airways, that kind of thing. EMT I's do not administer any drugs, other than O2, glucose and epi (for allergic reactions), and they don't perform any kind of invasive procedure. That being said, there are big time advantages to getting your licence (and you still get to drive the ambulance!)

    You don't have to do full time work with your licence - but it can really help to get your foot in the door for interesting volunteer opportunities that your comrades won't have.

    Are you taking this course for college units? If so, those units count toward your science GPA. I have 13 units of A for my EMT course. The class was easy-peasy and a lot of fun. I made some good friends, too. It was the easiest and best thing I've done for my med school application. So, in case you haven't figured it out, I say... go for it!

    Good luck,

    Nanon



    [This message has been edited by Nanon (edited April 27, 2001).]
     
  4. mpp

    mpp SDN Moderator
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2001
    Messages:
    3,398
    Likes Received:
    15
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I'm just finishing up an EMT course myself. There's a lot of good information and the instructors I had were a blast. As a side benefit, it was an easy 6-credits of 'A' towards my science GPA but it did take up a lot of time. Go for it.
     
  5. Pegasus

    Pegasus Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2000
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    1
    Nannon ir right. I was an EMT in undergrad and love the course. Got to know some great people too. Yeah, paramedics have another 2 years to go, but after you are done with your EMT-Basic, you can take another short course for EMT-D..defib? i think.
    Anyway, you can also try to do nursing assistant too. I did that after my EMT and got to know some docs very well. Talked to med students all the time as well as residence.
    When it came time to apply for school, I had several docs offer to read my personal statement. I needed to work while in undergrad, and the EMT's are mostly volunteer, 24hour shifts, so I couldnt do this. NA worked out great for me, especially since I got to work in the ER and do CPR and lots of on hands stuff.

    Hope this helps,


    ------------------
    ~Pegasus~
     
  6. Jules_dynamos

    Jules_dynamos Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2001
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Really, the courses in an EMT program count toward that science gpa? I thought the only courses that counted were the pre-med req's and upper division science major courses. For example, an upper division orgo course, adv math courses, adv physics, genetics, etc. You know what I mean.

    Could I use some of the science courses I took for a pre-nursing program? I took these courses before deciding to go into medicine.

    thanks

    [This message has been edited by Jules_dynamos (edited April 28, 2001).]
     
  7. relentless11

    relentless11 Going broke and loving it
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2001
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    8
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Sounds great! I'm doing it no matter what, however sorta bumbed that an EMT-1 won't get me a ride on an ambulance(short of being a patient..haha).

    I believe the class counts for units. I am unsure if it is letter graded or pass/no pass. Never the less, i'll take it if time permits. Thanks for the help though.

    Anyone here have any other neat things to do that are both fun and great on the application?
     
  8. Nanon

    Nanon An urban myth.

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2000
    Messages:
    1,740
    Likes Received:
    16
    Actually, you have to ride on the ambulance in you want to be an EMT I. It's part of the training. And if you want to work as an EMT I, you have to get your ambulance drivers licence...

    Nothing like driving an ambulance...

    Nanon
     
  9. relentless11

    relentless11 Going broke and loving it
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2001
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    8
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Whoo-hoo! Hehe, get to fullfill my childhood dream [​IMG]
     
  10. castaway

    castaway Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Yes, Relentless, you have to be on the ambulance as part of your clinical training for the EMT-B. I just started volunteering on an EMS as a non-med observer. That is, I cannot do much (except CPR and other things that any bystander could do) right now, but, let me tell you, the experience of riding on the ambulance and watching what to me is out of 3rd Watch is an intense and great experience. In fact, after my first run (recently) I was convinced that I should take the EMT-B course that the community college in my district offers in the summer. My advice is, contact the EMS in your neighboorhood and ask to volunteer on the ambulance. Many EMS's depend on volunteers (both EMT and nonEMT), and your EMS should be able to welcome you with open arms. Yes, go for it!!
     
  11. getphedup

    getphedup Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2001
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nurse aide in a teaching hospital ED will get you more experience and patient care. I did it for two years, ended up doing some research as well, got to know docs and residents really well. Much better route than EMT.
     
  12. Pegasus

    Pegasus Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2000
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    1
    I do agree that being a Nurses Aid in the ED is the better route to go for many reasons. I have posted this many times before and my experience in the ED made me love medicine so much. I guess the best advantage is that you get to know the hospital staff really well. First, the docs love to teach you and answer any question you have. You also can get GREAT letters of rec this way!!! In addition, you spend more time with personal patient care, you not only get to see the initial trauma, but also the CT scans, Xrays, and learn how the whole system works. It really was an invaluable part of my decision and love for medicine!
    However, NA is very hard work. You will have to clean up urine and feces and vomit (although much less of these if you work in the ED compared to the floor). You will have to stock, run errands, ect. But that is what will make you appreciate the teamwork involved in taking care of a patient.

    Either way, EMT/NA, they will both give you great insight to the medical field, and I am glad that you are going to do it. I recomend that every premed do this type of work!
     
  13. rdennisjr

    rdennisjr SDN Super Moderator
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2000
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just a really minor clarification on levels of EMT's....at least in most of the US - cali may be different just because it's cali :D

    EMT-Basic (EMT-B) - basic level of treatment. Trained in CPR, non-invasive airways (including oral/nasal airways), splinting, bleeding management, shock management, assesment, O2, gluccose, charcoal, epi (pens), can assist with Nitro.

    Standard scenario - arrive, asses, package, transport, call for assistance if need additional skills

    EMT-D (slowly going away) - Just and EMT-B who is also trained to use the Defib.

    EMT-I(ntermediate) (new skills starting this year) - EMT-B skills, plus IV, Intubation, Acid-base info. Basically, additional training in trauma management. This one is the most variable state-to-state. Some states are starting to add basic cardiac drugs along with a few others such as Narcan. Some states allow surgical chric, needle decompresion, etc.

    EMT-P(aramedic)- All of the above, plus meds, EKG. King of the hill of pre-hospital medicine here in the US. Biggest additional area of training is Medical patients (comes down to drugs man!) This is a huge undertaking - a year to two years of training, ride-alongs, ER time, etc.

    Just a few words of wisdom....or old age babble or some such. :D
     
  14. Medic171

    Medic171 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2001
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I have been a paramedic for 3 years. I hope it is my ticket to med school
     
  15. mast

    mast Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2001
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    I also have been a paramedic for the last 4 years and will start medical school in August. I got certified as an EMT during high school (16 years old). I love my job and will miss it when I go back to school. Being an EMT will allow you to actually practice medicine, rather than just observe others. I highly recomend it to any premed who has the opportunity.
     
  16. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  17. chypes

    chypes Caffine Addict

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2000
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mast,
    How did you become an EMT during HS? Was getting your cert. that early usefull? Did you do anything with it during HS? Are you allowed to complete all the training (hands-on stuff) while still a minor? I might be interested in doing this. Thanks for any info. :cool:
     
  18. 12R34Y

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2000
    Messages:
    1,678
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I have been both an NA for a level 1 trauma center and a full-time paramedic for the last 4 years and have to say that being a paramedic was far more valuable for gaining insight into medicine. You are completely responsible for a patient. NA's are in no way responsible for a patient. The nurses, doctor, PA's are. I'm not slamming NA's, I had wonderful experiences, but you can intubate, defibrillate, start IV/IO's and give meds, etc.....No way that being an NA compares.
    my opinion only.

    later
     
  19. getphedup

    getphedup Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2001
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    6 weeks at a community college for NA vs 2-3 years for paramedic? Are you doing this for experience or as a career choice? Nurse aide gives experience and insight into the field of medicine. Personal choice and what you are wanting to gain from it. I think NA gives more interaction with patients and more time around an excellent learning environment intsead of waiting around to make a call. Both are good...
     
  20. MS04MEDIC

    MS04MEDIC Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2001
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would encourage you to pursue the EMT/Paramedic route if you have the time. Two of my fellow flight medic co-workers are in Texas Tech Med School and they both said that it helped them. I hope to be going in the near future. It will, at the least, help you in the clinical phases of med school. You will already know how to take V/S, EKGs,intubations, etc. Hope this helps.
     
  21. Dr6

    Dr6 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have worked as an EMT-B (basic) for the last four years in Beavercreek, a suburban city of Dayton, OH. It has most likely been the best thing I could have done to get into Med school. Not only that I really love the job and will really miss it when I start school in the fall. I would have loved to have gotten my paramedic cert, but as mentioned in previous posts, it does take almost two years and is more intense than EMT-B classes.
    I would definitely say go for it. But be prepared for some time committment. I worked for a fire department and I was required to get a fire cert also, which I found out later that I really enjoyed firefighting also. I think the important thing is to get some clinical experience no matter what type it is. I think it is important to let the admissions committee know that you have some real life knowledge of medicine and not just that you are good on tests.
     
  22. castaway

    castaway Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Hey MS04MEDIC, I will be taking the EMT-B course this summer. I am also a TX resident and currently waitlisted at Texas Tech. You mentioned that you know two fellow EMT's who got into Tech. Do you mind telling me what kinds of things you think helped them to get in? I realize (belatedly) that the EMT is an excellent way to get a closer look at medicine. I am presently volunteering as a "non-med" driver at an EMS, and the paramedics really like teaching me and showing me how various procedures are done. It's definitely the most exciting thing I have done since I decided that medicine is what I want to do. Thanks!
     
  23. Hamster

    Hamster Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2001
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    --relentless11
    I would research the need for EMT's in your area. I too took a class at a local community college (EMT classes were not offered at my college). Upon passing the state exam and recieving my license. I quickly realized that you need at least a 1 YEAR OF EXPERIENCE to be hired by an EMS squad. So the only option was volunteering for me :(
    Don't get me wrong I don't mind volunteering, but I just anticipated this as "the thing I am going to do on my year off". So I had to find something else. To make things worse there were a ton of people in my same boat. All of the EMS squads were over run by volunteers but desperately seeking experienced people for hire. So EMS squads 'seemed' unconcerned with getting in contact with me about possible shifts I could volunteer with. Very disappointing.
    Also are you a resident? EMS squads in NC require you to have a NC Drivers License. Make sure you update yourself on your immunizations wayy in advance too!
    Other than that GO FOR It! :)
     
  24. Krazed_Medic

    Krazed_Medic Registered Banned User

    Joined:
    May 5, 2001
    Messages:
    446
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I know that at one of the Universities here in Oklahoma, that the pre-med advisor recommends all pre med students take at least the EMT-B. You can actually do a lot with the EMT-B. You can work in ER's as techs gaining valuable experience making patient contact and also working with doctors and nurses. Of course, I am an
    EMT-I right now with about 5 months of paramedic class to go. By taking the paramedic course, it has brought so much insight to the wonderful world of medicine to me. It kind of makes you excited to learn! :D
     

Share This Page