Energetics of Glucose Catabolism

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

GoldenSword

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2006
Messages
33
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
ok, I'm really confused on this topic w/ 3 different sources,

1-TPR: 2.5 ATPs per NADH
..........1.5 ATPs per FADH2
total for Eukaryotic aerobic resp: 30
total for Prokarytic aerobic resp: 32

2-EK: 3 ATPs per NADH
........2 ATPs per FADH2
total for Eukaryotic aerobic resp: 36
total for Prokaryotic aerobic resp: 38

3-My Biochem teacher: something close to EK, but I end up w/ 38 ATPs for Eukaryotic and 40 for Prokaryotic :laugh:

Clarification please, me very very confused, DAMN it....LOL
 

turquoise_water

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2006
Messages
55
Reaction score
1
oh boy 40 ATPs for Prokaryotes :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

ok coming back to your question ....

In Glycolysis, there is net gain of 2 ATPs, + 2 NADH

Pyruvate Decarboxylation yields 1 NADH for each pyruvate molecule. We have 2 pyruvates from Glycolysis, therefore, 2 NADH gain from here .

Now we move to Kreb Cycle , for each pyruvate you get 1 ATP, 3 NADH, 1 FADH2 (the way i remember it is 1:3:1 ) . We have 2 pyruvates, therefore its going to be.... 2 ATPs , 6 NADH , 2 FADH2

now comes the Electron Tranport .... where each NADH produces 3 ATP, and each FADH2 produces 2 ATPs ....

The most important thing to remember here is that the 2 NADHs we got from Glycolysis DONT enter mitochondria and dont participate in ETC, therefore they yield 2 ATP each and not 3

Now if u calculate the TOTAL ATPs .... you get 36 :D

* 2 ATP - Glysolysis
* 4 ATP - from 2 NADH produced by glycolysis
* 6 ATP - from pyruvate decarboxylation
* 2 ATP, 18 ATP (from 6 NADH), 4 ATP (from 2 FADH2) - Kreb Cycle

Hope this helped :)
 

GoldenSword

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2006
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
oh boy 40 ATPs for Prokaryotes :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

ok coming back to your question ....

In Glycolysis, there is net gain of 2 ATPs, + 2 NADH

Pyruvate Decarboxylation yields 1 NADH for each pyruvate molecule. We have 2 pyruvates from Glycolysis, therefore, 2 NADH gain from here .

Now we move to Kreb Cycle , for each pyruvate you get 1 ATP, 3 NADH, 1 FADH2 (the way i remember it is 1:3:1 ) . We have 2 pyruvates, therefore its going to be.... 2 ATPs , 6 NADH , 2 FADH2

now comes the Electron Tranport .... where each NADH produces 3 ATP, and each FADH2 produces 2 ATPs ....

The most important thing to remember here is that the 2 NADHs we got from Glycolysis DONT enter mitochondria and dont participate in ETC, therefore they yield 2 ATP each and not 3

Now if u calculate the TOTAL ATPs .... you get 36 :D

* 2 ATP - Glysolysis
* 4 ATP - from 2 NADH produced by glycolysis
* 6 ATP - from pyruvate decarboxylation
* 2 ATP, 18 ATP (from 6 NADH), 4 ATP (from 2 FADH2) - Kreb Cycle

Hope this helped :)

Thanks a lot, now it makes sense. This is just what EK was explaining and I just didn't understand their calculation.
:thumbup:
 

cookiegurl

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
22
Reaction score
0
Okay, I think I definitely learned it differently than turquoise_water. All of this information is in Lehninger's Principles of Biochemistry btw if you want to check it out.

Glycolysis (Glucose --> 2 pyruvate)
4 ATP and 2 NADH per glucose molecule (2 substrate level phosphorylation to form each pyruvate)

Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (pyruvate --> acetyl CoA)
2 NADH (Enzyme 3)

Krebs Cycle (oxidation of acetyl CoA --> CO2)
2 GTP/ATP, 6 NADH, 2 FADH2

NADH = 2.5 ATP
FADH2 = 1.5 ATP

So, total
NADH = 10 x 2.5 = 25 ATP
FADH2 = 2 x 1.5 = 3 ATP
4 ATP (glycolysis) = 4 ATP

Total: 32 ATP max
It should be 34 ATP if you include the GTP/ATP formed during Krebs Cycle-- but you also did use 2 ATP during the Prep phase of Glycolysis.

But, you can make 30 ATP also

How? This is due to the mechanism that transports the NADH from the cytosol (formed during glycolysis) to the mitochondria.

If you use the Aspartate/Malate Shuttle, the NADH actually enters the mitochrondria and is used to form ATP but if you use Glycerol 3 (P) Dehydrogenase to directly transfer NADH's electrons to FAD in Complex II (ETC), you do not make ATP with them.

The short reason why is that ATP synthesis is directly related to the # of H+ being pumped out across the membrane. In Complex II (the method using Glycerol 3 (P)) of ETC, NO H+ is pumped out during electron transfer. Thus, less protons = less ATP, and therefore, the reason for the ATP range.

Hope I didn't make this overly complicated (or messed up on a part!!) :)

Good luck with studying
 
Top