Engineering classes count for BCPM?

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Enginerd42

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Hey all, I think the title says it all. I've taken quite a few chemical engineering classes (thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, separation processes, etc.) and am wondering if they can be included in the AMCAS BCPM GPA (wow, what a great sequence of acronyms!)? They aren't pure chemistry or physics courses, but physics and ochem are prereqs for them. Any ideas would be great. Thanks!

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Ah a conundrum I had too. I was an engineering phyics major so I had a bunch of classes like that too. How did I handle it? The classes I did well in (A, A-) I included as BCMP. The classes I got B's in I did not include. :D And AMCAS has verified my application so I think it's OK.

Frankly I think it can go either way.
 
You really ARE a genius! That's a great idea, thanks. :clap:
 
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I might've been able to take that one with a grain of salt if it wasn't for the evil avatar. Actually, you are partially correct. Many of the courses I have taken, it appears, fall under chemistry, even though they were administered by the dept of chemE. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction though.
 
ARRRGGGH. Hmm...

Well I can't really do anything about it now (unless I voluntarily pull myself out of the application process.)
 
I just looked at pg 68 and its worth looking at. They spell out certain classes in the engineering curricula that must be ENGI, but they also listed "Thermodynamics" as Chemistry, "Biophysics" and "Biotechnology" (I believe) as Biology.

So worth looking at.
 
Ya I noticed that. The list for each topic is somewhat brief though and there's definitely some lee-way as to how you could interpret each class. I think a good majority of my classes would fall under chemistry, save for maybe 2 or3. I'm sure you'll be fine the way you filled yours out. EPhys courses could definitely go either way I would think.
 
Yea, and I took 10 of the core engineering physics courses over in England (Heat transfer, solids, atomic physics, statics, thermo, and a host of other classes that I have completely forgotten and are utterly worthless as a software engineer.)

I thought about what I did some more, and there were only 2 or 3 classes where I think I messed up. I'm not going to fret about it.
 
If you want the honest approach, here it is:

Carefully think about each engines class you took. If the focus of the class was engineering rather then science, then list it as engineering. E.g. a bioengineering class, or a chem engineering that focuses on streamlining production, that should be engineering. If, however, it's an engines class that focuses on the equations of fluid mechanics or on inorganic catalysis applications in engineering, I would list it as science.
 
mercaptovizadeh said:
If you want the honest approach, here it is:

Carefully think about each engines class you took. If the focus of the class was engineering rather then science, then list it as engineering. E.g. a bioengineering class, or a chem engineering that focuses on streamlining production, that should be engineering. If, however, it's an engines class that focuses on the equations of fluid mechanics or on inorganic catalysis applications in engineering, I would list it as science.

Yea I think that is sensible. But I also took these classes from 92 - 98. I barely remember what school I went to, let alone what I learned in those courses. :eek:
 
mercaptovizadeh said:
If you want the honest approach, here it is:

Carefully think about each engines class you took. If the focus of the class was engineering rather then science, then list it as engineering. E.g. a bioengineering class, or a chem engineering that focuses on streamlining production, that should be engineering. If, however, it's an engines class that focuses on the equations of fluid mechanics or on inorganic catalysis applications in engineering, I would list it as science.


That pretty much sums it up right there I think, thanks Mercapto. BTW, does the "mercapto" part of your screen name have anything to do with thiols? I remember from Ochem that the "mercapto" prefix is IUPAC nomenclature for a SH group. Just curious. Also, no hard feelings Agent Smith... I'm just funnin with ya
 
Enginerd42 said:
That pretty much sums it up right there I think, thanks Mercapto. BTW, does the "mercapto" part of your screen name have anything to do with thiols? I remember from Ochem that the "mercapto" prefix is IUPAC nomenclature for a SH group. Just curious. Also, no hard feelings Agent Smith... I'm just funnin with ya

Yes, mercapto refers to SH when something supercedes the thiol name.
 
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