swifteagle43

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If I rent an apartment for a month in another state, does that count as establishing residency?

How can I establish residency? I want to go to a school on the west coast honestly....
 

veenut

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requirements for establishing residency vary from state to state, check out a state's website to get the particular details of what you need to do.

that said, i don't know of ANY state that will allow you to claim residency after living there for a month, and i bet california has some pretty strict reqs.
 

Law2Doc

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swifteagle43 said:
If I rent an apartment for a month in another state, does that count as establishing residency?

How can I establish residency? I want to go to a school on the west coast honestly....
You'd need to check with the schools -- each state and each school can have their own definition of residency. Typical things looked at are primary residence, ownership or lease, whether you have lived there for a period of time (can be up to 5 years in some states) in a capacity other than as a student, where you pay taxes, where you have a driver's license, where you are registered to vote, where you went to high school, and so on. You generally can have only one residency, and you (or your family if you are attending school out of state) really need to live there, in most cases. Make sure you know the schools rules before signing a lease.
 
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jebus

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For some places it requires you to establish a domicile, be an independent (as claimed on your tax return), and live in the state for 12 consecutive months without attending an institution of higher education and be gainfully employed. At least that's the way it is in Texas. Documents to prove you have established domicile include a driver's license, voter registration, utility bills, lease agreement, income tax forms, or proof of purchase of a homestead.
Oh, and you can be a resident of two states. Employees of Los Alamos National Lab are NM residents. But because LANL is run by the University of California, employees also have CA residence. But then you have to work at Los Alamos National Labs....
 

unfrozencaveman

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And, in some cases, like mine, you have to have state adcoms over for dinner, and take pictures of yourself with the miami herald every day and email it to them. Not that I'm bitter, or anything...
But, still, like the above posters said, do your homework about the residency thing, and follow it to the letter. They WILL check up on you, and then, they'll be pretty skeptical about it.
 

10yearmedic

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As stated above, it varies from state. Some states require you to live in the state for 12 months before applying to med school (AMCAS), some states require you to live in the state for a year before attending school, and some schools will grant residency after living in that state for a year, even as a student. My premed advisor had a book that contained all of that info.
 

Dakota

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desiredusername said:
Oh, and you can be a resident of two states. Employees of Los Alamos National Lab are NM residents. But because LANL is run by the University of California, employees also have CA residence. But then you have to work at Los Alamos National Labs....
Unfortunately you can not be a resident of two states during this admisions process. The AMCAS app makes you pick one and only one state. Sometimes under unusual circumstances people have their choice of two different states, but come application time you have to make a choice. It'd be nice to be in-state for a few different states tho . . .
 

jebus

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AMCAS sucks. How many times have I told you to stop hanging out with them? They are a bad influence on you.
 

Dakota

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I know, I know . . . but they promised me if I just do a few more things for them that I'll be cool . . . I mean I just have to take these little bags over to the corner where this guy named Sweetness gives me money in exchange for the little bags. If I quit now they'll think I'm a loser. (And if AMCAS thinks I'm a loser then that can't bode well for medical school acceptance now can it?)
 

Doctor Bagel

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in my west coast state (oregon), you have to live here for 12 months without being here primarily to be a student. the cool things are that if you move here and can't find a job for a few months, those unemployed months still count, and you can go to school parttime (basically, don't exceed 8 hours a quarter). to help prove residency, you want to get a drivers license and register to vote asap.
 

NCF145

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desiredusername said:
For some places it requires you to establish a domicile, be an independent (as claimed on your tax return), and live in the state for 12 consecutive months without attending an institution of higher education and be gainfully employed. At least that's the way it is in Texas. Documents to prove you have established domicile include a driver's license, voter registration, utility bills, lease agreement, income tax forms, or proof of purchase of a homestead.
Oh, and you can be a resident of two states. Employees of Los Alamos National Lab are NM residents. But because LANL is run by the University of California, employees also have CA residence. But then you have to work at Los Alamos National Labs....
Ok well then I have a question for you. I have lived in Texas since July 27, 1997. I attended high school in Texas and I am currently attending a university in Texas. My parents just recently moved to Arizona and I am a dependent. I still have a Texas drivers license and have no intentions of leaving the state. Am I still considered a resident or do I have to claim that I am independent on my tax returns first?

I hope I am a resident of Texas b/c I have 7 state schools to apply to instead of Arizona's 1

Thanks

NCF
 
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