Ethical issues and healthcare policy

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skiing

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If anyone is interested, I thought it might be helpful for us to practice for interviews by conversating and debating about ethical issues and healthcare policy topics. If you're down to practice and debate, we can help each other out. Respond to this thread and/or PM me and we can set up something on Skype or google plus.

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I'm interested. Could use some practice or just to see what kind of topics are most relevant in people's minds.
 
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If anyone is interested, I thought it might be helpful for us to practice for interviews by conversating and debating about ethical issues and healthcare policy topics. If you're down to practice and debate, we can help each other out. Respond to this thread and/or PM me and we can set up something on Skype or google plus.

Careful - from what I understand, I don't think interviewers are looking for a debate or an argument, and you might be setting yourself up for trouble if you're responses to these questions are too strong and opinionated.
 
I will give a stab at this although I'm not sure that it applies: what about the question that goes somewhere along the lines of you have a 10 year old with terminal cancer and the parents refuse to tell the child and never intend to? What do you do when the child asks you what is wrong with them?
 
I will give a stab at this although I'm not sure that it applies: what about the question that goes somewhere along the lines of you have a 10 year old with terminal cancer and the parents refuse to tell the child and never intend to? What do you do when the child asks you what is wrong with them?

Honor the parent's wish as they have the authority over his treatment. You can, however, inform the child if not doing so will cause harm or impede his treatment. But before that, persuade the parents for the child's best interest.

Remind me of an episode of Scrub when the deaf dad does not want his deaf son to have a cochlea fixed because that was their connection.


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Honor the parent's wish as they have the authority over his treatment. You can, however, inform the child if not doing so will cause harm or impede his treatment. But before that, persuade the parents for the child's best interest.

Remind me of an episode of Scrub when the deaf dad does not want his deaf son to have a cochlea fixed because that was their connection.


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But does that mean that as the parent they can refuse treatment, or is that a form of child abuse? What about if the child knows and wants treatment but the parents refuse? Im sure there are policies on this sort of thing, which is why I wasn't sure if it was a good one.
 
But does that mean that as the parent they can refuse treatment, or is that a form of child abuse? What about if the child knows and wants treatment but the parents refuse? Im sure there are policies on this sort of thing, which is why I wasn't sure if it was a good one.

This is similar to the story of the Jehovah witness parents who refuse blood transfusion for their child. To override the parent authority, I believe the doctor went to court. Also, I also think the law said if the child is informed and understand the options of treatments, the child can override the parent's authority to receive treatments as well.


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This is similar to the story of the Jehovah witness parents who refuse blood transfusion for their child. To override the parent authority, I believe the doctor went to court. Also, I also think the law said if the child is informed and understand the options of treatments, the child can override the parent's authority to receive treatments as well.


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Oh nice, I had no idea. Thanks! I will have to try and think up a better one for next time haha
 
This is similar to the story of the Jehovah witness parents who refuse blood transfusion for their child. To override the parent authority, I believe the doctor went to court. Also, I also think the law said if the child is informed and understand the options of treatments, the child can override the parent's authority to receive treatments as well.


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Yeah, this is a pretty cliche scenario now. Basically if its medically necessary to avoid serious bodily harm (such as death), parents do not have a right to refuse treatment for their child, and depending on the child's age, s/he may be deemed unable to make that judgment for themselves, so the treatment would be given. If it's non-emergent, generally a doctor would seek a court order. If it is emergent and a court order would take too long, a doctor should be safe in such a scenario performing medically necessary treatment.


Why stick to pm/skype? As Geebeejay said, youre not going to be having a full on debate in you interview (at least most likely not), so might as well have something open here so people can develop their positions and their reasoning behind them (which is the most important thing). Some one pick a subject they think is interesting and get it started.
 
If you guys are really interested about these issues, I would definitely suggest reading a few major publications in various bioethics journals. That way, not only will you gain a wide perspective of the debates being made, but you'll also have an informed opinion.

Feel free to debate it out in forums, but doing a bit of research will go much further.

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The idea was to not only read about these but get used to talking about them and explaining one's point of view coherently, as we don't often have the opportunity to practice and build on this skill. I don't know about you, but for me, this type of conversation takes a bit of getting used to. So again, if anyone wants to practice with me, let me know.
 
I definitely get what you're saying, but that will really only be helpful if you speak over a Skype call or in person. It's a lot easier to type text as if you're writing an essay versus physically speaking and having to listen/answer gracefully.

Just my opinion!

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I will give a stab at this although I'm not sure that it applies: what about the question that goes somewhere along the lines of you have a 10 year old with terminal cancer and the parents refuse to tell the child and never intend to? What do you do when the child asks you what is wrong with them?

there was an episode about this exact same thing on scrubs and Dr. Cox ended up telling the kid but he didn't tell the kid he had cancer but explained to him what was happening to his body without saying the word cancer.
 
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