aa4

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2006
31
0
Status
Pre-Medical
i need some help with examkracker's strategy to go back to the question stem question and answer choices after you did the passage.

what am i supposed to be getting out of it or looking for. am i supposed to do this before i look at the explinations for the right/wrong answers.

i got 9s on the first three examkrackers verbal tests from 101 passages, any advice on how i can improve?

thanks!
 

ADeadLois

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2005
3,158
6
Status
Medical Student
aa4 said:
i need some help with examkracker's strategy to go back to the question stem question and answer choices after you did the passage.

what am i supposed to be getting out of it or looking for. am i supposed to do this before i look at the explinations for the right/wrong answers.

i got 9s on the first three examkrackers verbal tests from 101 passages, any advice on how i can improve?

thanks!
See post #166 in this thread.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=297705&page=7&pp=25
 
About the Ads

H and D

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 26, 2006
95
0
37
Minnesota
Status
Pre-Medical
I am a firm believer in the question stem and answer choices method (and I have been scoring in the 10-12 range on practice tests).
Here is part of a PM I typed up for someone else needing help. I break down and answer a pretend question based on answer choices only.
Maybe it will help? I am not sure.
Feel free to PM me if you have specific questions about it or think of other questions I may be able to help with.

"The main idea of the passage is that the novel JACK and JILL"
a) won the Pulitzer Prize for its author, Rita Dove
b) is divided into two almost equal parts
c) reveals different perspectives on the same events
d) delineates the psychological and emotional lives of two individuals

Alright, right away you should be able to eliminate choices a and b. For choice a, although this statement is true, it is highly unlikely that the whole point of a MCAT passage is that an author won an award, unless the passage was an autobiography of the author and even if it was it is still unlikely one award would be the main idea. This choice is much to simple and detail oriented for a main idea question. Likewise in choice b, the fact that the work is divided in to two parts is also a detail and is not very important when we are looking for a main idea of an MCAT passage. That leaves choices c and d which could both be the answer and they actually kind of say the same thing. However choice d is much more detailed and complex. It seems to present the themes of a complex novel that would be worth winning a Pulitzer prize. Choice c states that the main idea of the book was about presenting different perspectives. If this was true the book probably would not have won a Pulitzer prize since it is too simplistic of a main idea/theme.
In this way you can answer what could be a difficult main idea question without ever needing to read the passage, simply by analyzing clues from the answer choices (in this case the question was no help).

I hope this example helped.
 

ADeadLois

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2005
3,158
6
Status
Medical Student
H and D said:
I am a firm believer in the question stem and answer choices method (and I have been scoring in the 10-12 range on practice tests).
Here is part of a PM I typed up for someone else needing help. I break down and answer a pretend question based on answer choices only.
Maybe it will help? I am not sure.
Feel free to PM me if you have specific questions about it or think of other questions I may be able to help with.

"The main idea of the passage is that the novel JACK and JILL"
a) won the Pulitzer Prize for its author, Rita Dove
b) is divided into two almost equal parts
c) reveals different perspectives on the same events
d) delineates the psychological and emotional lives of two individuals

Alright, right away you should be able to eliminate choices a and b. For choice a, although this statement is true, it is highly unlikely that the whole point of a MCAT passage is that an author won an award, unless the passage was an autobiography of the author and even if it was it is still unlikely one award would be the main idea. This choice is much to simple and detail oriented for a main idea question. Likewise in choice b, the fact that the work is divided in to two parts is also a detail and is not very important when we are looking for a main idea of an MCAT passage. That leaves choices c and d which could both be the answer and they actually kind of say the same thing. However choice d is much more detailed and complex. It seems to present the themes of a complex novel that would be worth winning a Pulitzer prize. Choice c states that the main idea of the book was about presenting different perspectives. If this was true the book probably would not have won a Pulitzer prize since it is too simplistic of a main idea/theme.
In this way you can answer what could be a difficult main idea question without ever needing to read the passage, simply by analyzing clues from the answer choices (in this case the question was no help).

I hope this example helped.
:thumbup:

Actually, the question stem does give clues. It asks for the main "idea". A and B are both facts. It's unlikely the author devoted an entire passage to two things that are easily proven. You've got a 50/50 shot already and you didn't even need to read or understand the passage!
 

WestTexasRambler

Registered lurker
10+ Year Member
Jul 16, 2004
461
0
Hill Country
Status
Medical Student
ADeadLois said:
:thumbup:

Actually, the question stem does give clues. It asks for the main "idea". A and B are both facts. It's unlikely the author devoted an entire passage to two things that are easily proven. You've got a 50/50 shot already and you didn't even need to read or understand the passage!


Snap. I think y'all just helped me out.

Thanks,
 

viciouz

WesternU 2013
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Nov 7, 2005
712
1
Chino Hillls
Status
Medical Student
Sorry to ask this, but can anyone go into a little bit more detail... my verbal scores aren't that great =[
 
OP
A

aa4

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2006
31
0
Status
Pre-Medical
how do you approach the question that asks..."which of the following author's assertions is least supported..."
 

ADeadLois

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2005
3,158
6
Status
Medical Student
aa4 said:
how do you approach the question that asks..."which of the following author's assertions is least supported..."
First, go through the answer choices and eliminate any answer choice that is not an assertion of the author from your knowledge of the passage (but do NOT go back to the passage yet). There's usually one, maybe even two, choices that are points the author doesn't make. Sometimes these are irrefutable facts that also aren't technically an author's assertion

Second, eliminate any answer choice that appears to be the main idea of the passage. Logically, this idea will be heavily supported.

This is a question that might require you to go back to the passage. However, after a bit of practice, you might be able to recognize the correct answer (or, at the very least, eliminate another answer choice). They can really trick you by putting an answer choice that is a "weak" opinion of the author, or one that can be easily refuted. This is most likely to be seen in passages where the author presents the opinions or work of two different authors. The author may then refute one or two of the cited author's points or refer to it as weak. However, do NOT associate "least supported" with "weak". "Least supported" means giving the least factual or anecdotal evidence, not necessarily the weakest point the author makes. This is a common "trick" question.

Again, this type of question will most likely require you to go back to the passage. However, the tricks above can save you time.
 
OP
A

aa4

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2006
31
0
Status
Pre-Medical
ADeadLois said:
First, go through the answer choices and eliminate any answer choice that is not an assertion of the author from your knowledge of the passage (but do NOT go back to the passage yet). There's usually one, maybe even two, choices that are points the author doesn't make. Sometimes these are irrefutable facts that also aren't technically an author's assertion

Second, eliminate any answer choice that appears to be the main idea of the passage. Logically, this idea will be heavily supported.

This is a question that might require you to go back to the passage. However, after a bit of practice, you might be able to recognize the correct answer (or, at the very least, eliminate another answer choice). They can really trick you by putting an answer choice that is a "weak" opinion of the author, or one that can be easily refuted. This is most likely to be seen in passages where the author presents the opinions or work of two different authors. The author may then refute one or two of the cited author's points or refer to it as weak. However, do NOT associate "least supported" with "weak". "Least supported" means giving the least factual or anecdotal evidence, not necessarily the weakest point the author makes. This is a common "trick" question.

Again, this type of question will most likely require you to go back to the passage. However, the tricks above can save you time.

thanks! thats some good stuff!
 
OP
A

aa4

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 28, 2006
31
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I find i do extremely well on the first third-half of the questions, then completely bomb the last third...any thing that may help?
 

H and D

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 26, 2006
95
0
37
Minnesota
Status
Pre-Medical
Are you taking 5 second "mini breaks" between passages. After finishing a section, I always close my eyes and breath deeply, counting to 5 then I tackle the next passage. It helps me refocus on to the next passage and forget what I was just working on. It may help to take a breather between passages since it sounds like you are "running out of steam" near the end.
 
About the Ads