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Example of the volume in medical school?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by HenryH, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. HenryH

    HenryH AA-S
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    Medical students always allude to the vast quantities of information that must be memorized/learned in medical school, but it's difficult for us "pre-meds" to really get a substantive idea of how much more material must be memorized in medical school classes in contrast to undergrad. science classes.

    For example, in the cell biology course I took last fall, each test covered 3-5 chapters and the teacher taught and tested mostly from PowerPoint presentations. Each chapter was divided up into 3 (sometimes 4) separate PowerPoint presentations with each presentation containing approximately 33-45 slides. So most chapters totaled anywhere from 100-140 slides. Tests covered anywhere from 10-13 or 14 PowerPoint presentations total.

    For comparison, how much more material tends to be covered in medical school? I'm sure it's much more -- but how much more?
     
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  3. rajaholick

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    i think it has more to do with the time frame
    you take 1 semester in undergrad to cover cell biology
    in med school this maybe done in 12-14 weeks, so half the time
     
  4. slim78

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    How often did you have one of those tests?

    We will have a test covering that much info about once a week. Alternating between biochem and anatomy/histology/embryology.

    Not every school tests as often as azcom though.
     
  5. hermit

    hermit Senior Member
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    The average 50 minute lecture at my school has ~60 ppt slides.

    We average 4 lectures a day, 5 days a week. Of course this is not exact. There are labs and other random things in there - so some days more, some days less. But on average, it seems about right.

    So that's about 1200 slides a week.

    Like SLIM said, your example sounds about like a week's worth of material.
     
  6. Sandlot13

    Sandlot13 ER = love
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    is it weird that the prospects of that much studying sounds amazing to me!?!? ;)
     
  7. slim78

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    I've always been really good at focusing for hours while I study. Medical school, however, makes me feel like I have ADHD.

    When you are doing nothing but studying day in and day out for weeks and weeks it becomes difficult, at times, to maintain the focus.
     
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  8. NPEMTIV

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    At LMU-DCOM we do a systems based curriculum after the first semester and typically you'll cover an entire system in 3-5 weeks. This includes the histology, embriology, pharmacology, physiology, pathology, etc... As the basic sciences go, for example, our immunology course. We covered the entire subject in 3 weeks. It's quick. A 1 hour lecture for us equals 1-2 chapters of the corresponding book. My first semester was a rough adjustment.
     
  9. scpod

    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Our work load was obviously different since most courses were a component of PBL. We would have three tests per semester that covered from 45 to 55 chapters of material. No lecture slides, though, you had to read the whole chapters and anything in them was fair game. OMM was tested three times a semester (written and practical separately) from about 500 to 800 slides each time. Clinical Exam was tested twice a semester (the written part) with about 10 chapters each, with a practical exam and video-taped exam thrown in too.
     
  10. spicedmanna

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    I don't see much utility in providing an answer to your question, but I'll indulge you. It's difficult to get an idea for how difficult medical school can be until you actually experience it first hand and if I sit here and try to hash it out for you, you'll either think it's doable (which it is), or you'll be scared (for good reason).

    You can get a lot of material in different types of programs, not just medicine, but one of the more characteristic elements is the time crunch. You get a lot of material in very little time with high expectations. Here's an example:

    On the last exam we covered a little over two weeks of presentations and had perhaps 30 powerpoint lectures worth of material, each on average about 60 slides a piece, give or take some. Doing the math, this comes to about 1800 slides, some of which are about as dense as an academic textbook page, in two weeks. In addition to the presentations/lectures, and within the same time period, we had various reading assignments from textbooks and online sources. Furthermore, we had to essentially learn the histopathology of the current system for the pathology practical, which preceded the written exam, again within the same time period of a little over two weeks. Don't forget we also have OMT lab and material to learn concurrently, in a given section, and a practical to prepare for, generally covering a number of labs, and/or techniques (fortunately, the practicals generally come at the end of a section, but not always). In the most difficult of sections, we might have also have anatomy material to learn/memorize and lab, which eats up time. Fortunately, I am now done with all of my anatomy, but it's still eating up my time, because I am tutoring it. There are little assignments and labs here and there, too, that can make time management a bit more difficult. Keep in mind, also, that there are, in a typical six week section, two quizzes/exams per section, each covering similar amounts of information, which usually culminates in a comprehensive final at the end of the section, in some cases, along with practicals, if appropriate.

    I should also note that in some lectures, the material is quite dense, so in the most difficult of lectures, 60 slides along with the accompanying reading assignments may cover the equivalent amount of material that is normally covered in a typical semester-long college level class. Usually, though, it takes a couple presentations to cover that much material.

    Each system section has it's own challenges. For example, in musculoskeletal, you have a lot of anatomy, so the amount of memorization can be a bit overwhelming to some. In neuroscience, it's exceedingly difficult, because you have all those tiny, gray and white anatomical structures to learn and memorize, as well as the need to learn all the difficult concepts of neurophysiology and neuropathology in a protracted amount of time, which can be a real kick in the pants. In cardio and renal, the physiology and pharmacology can be very hard. Anyway, you get the point.

    There is just so much material to learn and it's hard, at least at the beginning, to know what you need for the exam and, thinking ahead, for the boards. Medical students, after a time, get good at sorting through all of it and triaging. It's part of the process. We get good at learning.

    Well, I hope this at least provides a two dimensional representation of "volume." Suffice it to say that you will be challenged and that medical school is nothing like undergrad.
     
    #9 spicedmanna, Dec 28, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2008
  11. rajaholick

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    one of the main reasons i chose msucom is because of the way their curriculum is modeled
    http://ap.com.msu.edu/preclerkship/
    because of the summer semesters, the fall and spring semesters are not as congested
    the volume of materials over the 2 years is the same, but its less/week
     
  12. rkaz

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    I am curious to how people manage who genuinely have ADHD. I wonder how they manage to get by and succeed.
     
  13. spicedmanna

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    Well, they made it this far, so, they've done what it takes, adapted... I'm thinking that this is likely pretty individual. Combine that with the proper medical management of their condition and voila. As a side note, you have to keep in mind that there are degrees of dysfunction and severity within the disorder.

    I don't get the sense that ADHD is the challenge in medical school, at least from observing my own class. It's depression and something akin to anxiety that seem to be in the forefront.
     
  14. DiverDoc

    DiverDoc KCUMB 2012
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    Hey Spiced, dont ya just love some of those presentations ( think back to CP) that was 20 pages of abbreviations. Gotta love those.
     
  15. spicedmanna

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    Hahaha...I know EXACTLY what (and who) you are talking about. I'd get such a headache trying to figure all of that out, i.e., decoding all of it. I definitely don't envy your current position, but can fully appreciate it.

    I know this is the last thing you probably want to do right now, but take a bit of time to read Dubin (EKG book) when you have a few free moments, i.e., aren't doing anything fun and exciting. It'll help when you get slammed with all the abnormal EKG's right toward the end of the section.

    Hope you are enjoying your break! I'm doing my best to make the most of it, knowing that boards are coming up and then rotations...
     
  16. MossPoh

    MossPoh Textures intrigue me
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    Most semesters I've participated in are about 15 weeks long....You must have some seriously long semesters.
     
  17. engineeredout

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    Great post. Scary to think of the adjustments that will have to be made to memorize that volume of material. How does your mind actually adapt to it? Does the majority of it just stay with you until the exams and then float away with the next topic?
     
  18. HenryH

    HenryH AA-S
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    SpicedManna -- 1800 PowerPoint slides? To learn in two weeks?

    ...Sheesh! How do you actually find the physical time during each day to memorize that much? Do you have a "photographic memory?" Do you read a sentence just once and remember what needs to be remembered?

    I made an A in the cell biology course, but just barely -- I think if I had missed just two or three more questions on the final, I would have reduced my final grade in the class to a B.

    I studied all the time for that class...or at least every evening, without a doubt. And besides my genetics class, that was the only "study intensive" course I took. But even though I always spent probably 1.5-2 hours every night studying the material, I still just *barely* made an A. It's like almost nothing would "stick"; I'd be reciting the material I'd studied in my head while trying to go to sleep, and I would always encounter "holes" when mentally reciting the material. Then the following days I would always begin my studying with what were meant to be brief reviews of the previous lecture's material (i.e., the PPT slides I attempted to memorize the night before), yet once I would begin reviewing the previous material, I would almost never get past it to begin reviewing the "new stuff."

    My main concern is, if I had to bust my butt to this extent to just barely scrape by with an A in college-level cell biology, how am I POSSIBLY going to earn an A in medical school-level cell biology? If I can't earn high grades/board exam scores, how would I ever hope to specialize? I realize that having not even started (or been accepted) to medical school makes it impossible for me to decide whether I want to specialize, but I definitely haven't decided that I don't NOT want to specialize. If I can't earn the grades, though, I'm essentially pigeonholed into a limited plane of primary care fields.

    Is it possible that I don't mentally have "what it takes" to be able to excel in medical school? Based on the anecdotes I've provided, do I sound like one of the students who will become known for spending hours and hours of every day studying, only to barely pass classes with Cs?
     
  19. RySerr21

    RySerr21 i aint kinda hot Im sauna
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    :confused: Semesters are not 6-7 months long. I think you are a little confused. Just for an example, my semester started the last few days of August (probably the mid 20s) and ended the first week of december (final day of class Dec 3)
     
  20. MJB

    MJB Senior Member
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    I often compare one week of MS to one semester of undergrad. That may not be entirely accurate, but I think it's fair to say that one month of MS easily covers as much if not more material than a typical semester of courses in undergrad would.

    Our immunology was probably the most brutal. A whole "course" and book in a little over a week of lecture.

    Renal System was also pretty intense. I think it was something like 49 lectures over the course of 11 days of lecture encompassing Renal Phys, Pharm, Histo, Embryology, Clinical stuff, etc...and we had other things going on right before the test for that system.

    What I'm really having trouble wrapping my mind around is how I'm going to study for boards over the next 6 months while also keeping up with coursework.
     
  21. TexasTriathlete

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    With my school being integrated curriculum, its hard to compare to undergrad. Its just a lot of work. The best way I can explain it...

    The last exam we took, I spent nearly every free minute I had for three weeks studying. Now I'm not going to say that it was all "quality" studying. There was some screwing around on the internet, or "studying" while working out, or while watching TV. But It was pretty consistent.

    I barely passed the exam, and the class average was failing.

    If I put that kind of effort into undergrad coursework, I would not have missed a single question. Even in the hardest classes.

    If I had put that kind of effort into MCAT prep, I probably would have gotten a 40.

    Why didn't I?

    Med school has a way of sharpening your studying skills. I just wasn't as good then as I am now. It is hard to explain, but you're around this **** so much that you just start to get good at taking it in.
     
  22. HenryH

    HenryH AA-S
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    Hold up -- you covered an entire course/textbook in a week?!
     
  23. TexasTriathlete

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    Don't worry about it. It's not as bad as it sounds. You'll work your ass off, and bitch about it all the time, but you'll be able to handle it.
     
  24. rajaholick

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    haha yeah i meant to say 14 weeks in undergrad
    half that time in med school
     
  25. DiverDoc

    DiverDoc KCUMB 2012
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    Thanks Spiced. We get slammed pretty heavy with ERF's stuff when we get back. Thank goodness for BRS and Goljan. Anyways, I read Dubins and felt confident on all of the EKGs on the midterm. Hopefully that wont be too bad for me. I pity the people who put off pathology until the night before the practical, it got cancelled prior to break and is one big practical now. :eek:
     
  26. spicedmanna

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    Yeah, exactly. It certainly won't be easy (there will be times when you want to drop out of medical school, question your sanity for entering this program, or want to crawl into a corner), but you'll figure out a way and it will be quite doable. Adversity has a great way of forcing you to creatively adapt. It's sort of difficult to generalize about adaptation strategies, however, since they are pretty individual. I mean, we all simply do what we have to do, mostly from trial and error, capitalizing quickly on what works, which can vary depending on learning and teaching style, etc.

    My most successful strategy has been to supplement with board review books, such as BRS or Rapid Review, so that I can see the whole story. There is, at least for me, a huge benefit from being able to see where the pieces (especially when they are intricate) fit into the puzzle. This helped, particularly with cardiopulmonary, renal, and neuroscience, where there are a lot of puzzle pieces and very complicated physiology. Optimally, I will review the lecture material at least 3 times before an exam, but I don't always get that chance. The first time I look at the material, it's usually from attending lecture, where, if possible, I will see what is emphasized by the lecturer. The second time, I will spend a long time trying to understand it and to summarize the key points and/or facts. It helps if you review right after the lecture, when you get home, while it's still fresh in your mind. Ideally, especially if it's complicated, I'll create a summary sheet of the lecture (or topic, if there is more than one lecture about it) and kind of go from there, reviewing the key concepts, or if there is a lot of stuff that needs to be known from a particular lecture, I might simply review it as a whole. The process of summarizing itself is very valuable and helps to cement the material in my mind. Honestly, though, having been through the gauntlet so many times now, my mind has adapted to this sort of process and I can almost do it in my head now. I make mental notes and write down important things that trigger recollection. If the material is simple enough, I can get away with reviewing things twice, where I needed to three times initially.

    Sometimes, I will work with another student and we will review the material together and teach it to each other, which also helps, adding our own insights to the learning. This works well with OMT and with pathology.

    For anatomy, I recommend spending a lot of time in the lab, using Netter's (or whatever atlas) and your lab list, and just combing through as many cadavers as you can, identifying all the structures. It helps to do it with a friend or two. If your school as tutors, definitely use them.

    Anyway, don't worry. Try to enjoy your interim period thoroughly. Once you start school, it'll probably be a little rough initially and you'll study more than you ever imagined, but soon, you'll find exactly what works for you and it won't be as bad. You get good at absorbing massive amounts of information. It's almost as if your brain gets more efficient at making synaptic connections or something. Also, you develop a sixth sense for what is important and what is not. You become able to cut through the crap and zoom into what is critical. All of this comes with practice and being put through the process. Pretty soon, you'll be skimming very complicated and dense text and you'll actually be able to get a lot from it in very little time.

    As for retention, I am remembering a lot more than I though I would. I think it has to do with making connections between material. However, it's also true that I've forgotten a lot. No worries, though. That's natural.
     
  27. bleeker10

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    Spicedmama, did you have an idea of how you wanted to start studying when you entered med school? Or did you just use a trial and error approach? I have very poor study habits and this needs to change. Mostly I start studying a few days before the exam, do well, and forget everything afterwards. Was there a counselor at your school who dealt with study habits or something similar? If so, did you know anyone who spoke with that person when school started or later?
    Thanks
     
  28. TexasTriathlete

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    Everyone does it differently. You'll have to figure it out for yourself. But I assure you that you will not be doing it the way you did in undergrad.
     
  29. DiverDoc

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    Dont fret too much about it now. I thought I knew what studying was and thought I was an efficient studier in undergrad. Youll adapt and your survival skillz will kick in, and youll be amazed and what you can accomplish and how efficiently you can make 2 hours of study effective study. It is pretty much constant though, I wouldnt dare start studying 2-3 days before an exam. For me 2-3 days before an exam is slowing down and making sure I get the big picture and understand whats going on.
     
  30. bleeker10

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    Yea I wasn't planning on studying for the exam a couple days before. I just recognize my flaws with studying and I'd like to have something or some idea in place for when I start med school. Otherwise I'm gonna spend my free time this upcoming summer working or going golfing.
     
  31. nascardoc

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    Every student who starts med school has the exact same feelings of, just how in the hell am I going to do this???? I know I was scared. Hell, I get scared when looking at upcoming schedules and seeing how it gets crammed together. But the amazing thing is you get thru it. You adjust to how you used to do things and do them differently for med school. In undergrad, I never studied more than I needed to, meaning I crammed for every test. Obviously, that is impossible now, so I've learned to study better each day, far out from an exam. At times, you feel like you can't focus and you are just looking at ink on pages and its frustrating as all get out, but you still have to grind it out.

    Don't let the fear of med school take over and stop you from applying and such. There are thousands of students who do it everyday and still have families, a life, etc. There are many sacrifices that will be made, but it can all be done.

    And yes, we covered a textbook in about week and a half. Like MJB said, Immuno sucked and was very intense, as was renal. As an example of study time, the saturday and sunday before our monday renal exam, I studied about 35 hours. Also, like MJB said, I am trying to figure out how to budget time to regular studies and board review.
     
  32. HenryH

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    ...But if I busted my butt with hours of studying just barely get by with an A in cell biology, how will I be able to possibly earn high grades in medical school? Maybe I'm just anxious, but is there some sort of "self-test" I could administer to myself to gauge my intellectual capacity for memorization?
     
  33. Chocolate Bear

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    Yes. It's called "med school." ;)
     
  34. scpod

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    About the "self-test"....you don't have to worry about that so much because it's automatically done for you by the admissions committees of the schools that accept you. They are pretty good at picking out people who will succeed. If you get accepted, you can be 90+ percent sure you'll make it.

    As for the capacity for memorization, you get pretty good at it with practice, but that's far from what medical school really is. Yes, some courses like Anatomy and Pharmacology are really just brute memorization, but to succeed you have to be able to pick the information you need out of what's in front of you and synthesize the knowledge you have, little though it may be. That's what the MCAT tests you on.

    When you get to the boards they rarely ask you simple facts.... but you need to know them in order to survive. The way you learn medicine is by repetition. The more times you see it, the easier it is to remember it. You'll find a way to get by. 90+ percent of the people do.
     
  35. MossPoh

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    No repetition? Sweet!
     
  36. HanginInThere

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    This is an excellent illustration of the difference between undergrad and med school. (But the class average was failing? Wow, that sucks! Congratulations on beating the mean, I guess...)

    Lots of good advice in this post. I'd just add that the Netter flash cards were extremely helpful for me.
     
  37. nascardoc

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    First, don't judge your med school potential by one class. If I did that, I never would be in school. Second, if you already have good study habits, which it sounds like you have, then that is a plus on your side. Third, I am not aware of any self-test, but if there were, it wouldn't be worth a hill of beans. Nothing can simulate being in school and actually putting in the work.
     
  38. HPSPpayissues

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    I think the power of repetition is very underestimated. For me, just going through all the slides or class notes as much as possible AFTER understanding the big pictures and important concepts gets me A's. I spend about two hours going through each lecture the first time; however, it takes me about ~45 min to 1 hour the second time; it is even less than that the third time. I quickly go through the material again (~ 15 min) a day or two before the exam. By then, I retain much of the details too. I think I am doing something right as I am consistently one of the highest performers in the class. Also, I study about 20 to 30 hours per week outside lectures, so I am not studying 24/7.
     
  39. HPSPpayissues

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    Rohen's is a must for practicals! I didn't spend that much time in the lab as others, but I did as well as, if not better, than them. However, I do recommend seeing all the muscles, organs, nerves, arteries, etc in actual cadavers at least twice during your dissections before relying exclusively on your atlas.
     
  40. singinfifi

    singinfifi Professional Insomniac
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    The following is an excerpt from an actual conversation:

    Me: you know, I don't think I study enough.
    Friend: Why's that?
    Me: I'm not miserable, I mean, I feel like it's really manageable
    Friend: What'd you do yesterday (conversation took place on a sunday night)
    Me: Oh. not much. Woke up around 10. Hung around till 11...went to dennys and studied till about 8, then went out to dinner with the boy and watched TV till about 2.
    Friend: And today?
    Me: Eh. Woke up about 10 and hung out a bit then went over to barns and noble and studied at about 11:30. I'm done now though (it was 7:00)
    Friend: So...in the last two days, both of which were WEEKEND DAYS you spent..... 17 hours studying?
    Me: Well no I............I mean....well $HIT. I guess I did. Huh. :eek: Wow.
    Freind: Still think you don't study enough?
    Me: I guess medical school has a way of adjusting your barometer of "normal" huh?
    Friend: Uh. yeah. Apparently.


    You'll do it. It won't seem so bad. then you'll look at it and go
    "...uh woah...seriously!?"
     
  41. Chocolate Bear

    Chocolate Bear Moderizzle Fo'Shizzle!
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    Well said! :thumbup: :D
     
  42. digitlnoize

    digitlnoize Rock God
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    Here's my experience:

    Imagine trying to drink from a firehose. Ok...classic, but not good enough. Imagine trying to drink all the oceans of the world in 10 weeks. Closer, but still not quite accurate...

    Imagine trying to drink. Yes. That's it. There will be lots of drinking. Especially after tests.

    Disclaimer: I go to LECOM-B, so we have the PBL thing and it's a bit different. That being said, we do anatomy in lecture, so I can extrapolate a bit...

    During anatomy, I sat in lecture all day, absorbed very little, then came home and studied until I fell asleep. Still not enough. You will average 4-6 hours of sleep a night...if you want to do well. You will average no more than 6 if you want to pass.

    During PBL (no lecture, but more material):

    Wake up at 7am. Start studying by 8am. Study from 8am-1pm. Go to school from 1-3 for group meeting. Come home and study from 3:30-11pm with a 30 minute break around 6-7 to eat dinner while watching TV and seeing my family. Go to bed at 11pm, but take a book with me to read as I fall asleep by midnight (hopefully). Repeat the next day.

    Now notice, I am now sleeping a max of 8 hours a night (although it's usually more like 6-7). This is good.

    If it's a weekend, I might take my family and books to the beach and study there. The difference being that it's hotter, and I get to get in the ocean for 10 minutes every 3-4 hours. HOORAY FOR BREAKS!!! Those 10 minutes are pure bliss. Being away from studying for just 10 minutes is a guilty pleasure.

    I study everywhere. All the time. I put my review sheets in zip-lock baggies so I can study in my hot-tub or shower. Time is THAT valuable.

    I have friends that do not leave school as long as it is open. They arrive at 6:30 am and leave at 11pm. Usually allow 30 min max for lunch and 1 hour for dinner.

    You learn ways to incorporate studying into "fun" activities. I never used to watch "House". Now, I do, because using the wikipedia episode guide, I can watch House episodes related to what I am studying, and combine fun with study.

    During anatomy, "watching some tv" meant watching Akland's Anatomy DVD's (must have.)

    Now, "listening to music" means listening to Goljan Path Lectures, or to my computer reading something to me in it's Stephen Hawking voice.

    Don't let this scare you though. During anatomy, I once spent my Friday night wish some friends in the anatomy lab. It was honestly a great Friday night. We marveled at the intricacies of the human heart and how it was friday night and our hands were inside someone's left atrium or ventricle and how amazing it all was. Makes it all worth it, and I wouldn't change a thing.

    Except all the studying. That can go. :)
     
  43. ShyRem

    ShyRem I need more coffee.
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    A pda can be your best friend in med school. You can download all the ppt files, flash cards, etc. onto it and carry it with you to study anywhere. Totally works. I studied like this in lines for the bank, waiting at a restaurant for a meal occassionally, red lights, anywhere. Take advantage of any small amount of time you can get. Lots of small amounts of time = large amounts of time and then you'll have extra time to spend with family (I have a husband and two kids) or friends.
     
  44. MossPoh

    MossPoh Textures intrigue me
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    Hmmm. That PDA idea isn't bad. It is much less awkward than carrying a stack of notecards in your pockets at all time.
     
  45. Pony46

    Pony46 Junior Member
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    Coming from a non-science backround this thread is mildly scary :(. I do however understand that when one is immersed in something the process of learning changes. To an outsider it would seem hard to imagine, but when you are in it, it is what it is and you adapt, even enjoy( i hope).

    Medical school is learning which is more similar to Bio and Orgo or even Chem, correct? ( I like these classes)

    least like Physics?? (Unless you are going into radiology, I wont be.)

    And perhaps more importantly, even with just the four pre-reqs and one upper level science class---Is it still doable?

    Anyone from non-science backround who cares to chime in or did already and wants to point me to their experience in the thread?

    Thanks
     
  46. nascardoc

    nascardoc Daddy to 2 kiddos
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    I'm not necessarily a non-science background, but I did get my degree in mechanical engineering, so I don't have the typical bio, chem, biochem, etc. degrees. Is it doable without being from one of the typical majors....wihtout a doubt, Yes! Like many people say, you are still taught everything you need in med school. What makes those majors helpful is that you have seen those topics before so they are familiar and you don't have to learn them the first time. That being said, med school is still very doable and you can get great grades without taking tons of science.

    In terms of comparing med school with undergrad classes, its a mixture of all of those. Its like bio and orgo in terms of just brute memorization in bio and lots of studying to understand orgo, not just memorize it. But it is also like physics in that you will have classes you absolutely hate, i.e. pharm (at least for me). Its like hanging by your toenails when studying for classes you don't lke, trust me. But like I've said in other posts, you just have to grind thru it. Obviously, medicine is more geared to classes like bio and orgo, and least like physics, but physio requires a lot of physics understanding. Lots of math and equations, and again, you need to understand how they work, and not just memorize them.

    Anywho, thinking about how med school can be is scary and will scare the hell out of you. But it is doable. All of us in it are saying that. You bring yourself to a new norm and except that you will study more than you ever have before. You will learn to love the times you aren't studying so you can watch TV guilt-free and hang out with your family and/or friends. Med school consumes your life, there is no way around it. You will hear about people who put in little work and kill exams and boards, while you are busting your hump to make those same grades. That doesn't make you stupid, it just makes them exceptional.

    And yes....that PDA idea is awesome. I'm gonna have to figure out how to make my Blackjack do all this. My cell phone knowledge goes up to dialing and playing games, after that, I have no idea :)
     
    #45 nascardoc, Dec 30, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  47. digitlnoize

    digitlnoize Rock God
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    Although I got my B.S. (finally) in Biology...I still count myself as being from a music background, because that's what I know.

    You will learn everything you need in med school, but I strongly advise you to get at least a rough working knowledge of the material covered in those pre-req classes...even physics. There's not much actual physics in med school, but it can help conceptually (think, flow through a pipe in relation to blood pressure type stuff). I hate physics too...there isn't much actual math though, which is good for me...

    For me, med school is like taking 6-8 Organic Chem classes at once. That seems like a good approximation. But, my Orgo class was brutally hard, but fun...kinda like med school.

    The PDA idea is great. I have a refubished Blackjack that I got for like, 50 bucks, and it's been a lifesaver at times. I can read powerpoints (when we have them...LECOM-B is not so much with the powerpoints), but I get far more use out of reading UpToDate articles on whatever disease we happen to be studying...It's also fun to be able to check SDN and Facebook from your phone...not that I do that or anything. ;)
     
  48. singinfifi

    singinfifi Professional Insomniac
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    ....you are WAY more dedicated then I am. I have dinners with my friends every monday (where there is a STRICT ban on studying) and I have a boyfriend I see anywhere between 2-5 times a week. I also don't avg 8 hours of sleep a night, but that's because I have SERIOUS trouble sleeping, not so much because of the studying. I'm probably *in bed* 8 hours a night. Sleeping? maybe 5-6...but I'm certainly passing thus far (B avg). I guess that's what you mean by PBL being different. yow.
     
  49. BCLumas

    BCLumas Member
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    PBL is what it is. It's definitely a different approach than the typical lecture-based format and requires a lot more motivation and dedication than I can say my UG classes ever demanded out of me. Instead of beating the PBL-v-LDP discussing to death... again... just know that wherever you go, whatever program you take, it will all take a lot of dedication to the material. Do not let PBL intimidate you, and message anyone from digitlnoize, myself, to any of the other LECOM people if you'd like a description of how we do it at LECOM-B.

    Good luck.
     
  50. NurWollen

    NurWollen Strong with the Force
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    I don't want to sound to mushy, you know, but I can't tell you how nice it is to hear someone being positive for a change. Thanks!!
     
  51. MossPoh

    MossPoh Textures intrigue me
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    Most med students I know are positive....when you catch them at the right time. That is usually not a few days before an exam but a day or two after or during a short break there is positive attitude oozing out. (Sometimes)
     

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