butac

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I have always been a big fan of Atul Gawande since I read his book Complications. This article is about the importance of checklists in modern medicine, and the surprising fact that many hospitals in the US still don't use them despite their proven success. I love his writing because it gives personal insight into being in an ICU or surgery, etc. He also addresses ethical and administrative concerns that are often overlooked. It's a little long, but it is an enlightening read.

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/12/10/071210fa_fact_gawande?printable=true
 

jult24er

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I have always been a big fan of Atul Gawande since I read his book Complications. This article is about the importance of checklists in modern medicine, and the surprising fact that many hospitals in the US still don't use them despite their proven success. I love his writing because it gives personal insight into being in an ICU or surgery, etc. He also addresses ethical and administrative concerns that are often overlooked. It's a little long, but it is an enlightening read.

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/12/10/071210fa_fact_gawande?printable=true

that was a great article. i like that guy's writing ...
 

chewsnuffles

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I have always been a big fan of Atul Gawande since I read his book Complications. This article is about the importance of checklists in modern medicine, and the surprising fact that many hospitals in the US still don't use them despite their proven success. I love his writing because it gives personal insight into being in an ICU or surgery, etc. He also addresses ethical and administrative concerns that are often overlooked. It's a little long, but it is an enlightening read.

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/12/10/071210fa_fact_gawande?printable=true

Everything by Atul is great
 
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not so calm now

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I have always been a big fan of Atul Gawande since I read his book Complications. This article is about the importance of checklists in modern medicine, and the surprising fact that many hospitals in the US still don't use them despite their proven success. I love his writing because it gives personal insight into being in an ICU or surgery, etc. He also addresses ethical and administrative concerns that are often overlooked. It's a little long, but it is an enlightening read.

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/12/10/071210fa_fact_gawande?printable=true
thanks for that link. Have you read his more recent book, Better? It's also really good - I love his style of writing.
 

armybound

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It's an interesting concept. Vanderbilt is trying to build electronic checklists for the prevention of some serious complications like ventilator-associated pneumonia. They had similar results as the article mentioned.
 

ILikeFood

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I've seen his books around. Just googled him.

stanford undergrad, harvard med, harvard mph, rhodes scholar, macarthur fellow, national book award finalist, staff writer for the new yorker...

what a freak...
 

scarletgirl777

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I've seen his books around. Just googled him.

stanford undergrad, harvard med, harvard mph, rhodes scholar, macarthur fellow, national book award finalist, staff writer for the new yorker...

what a freak...

Yeah, you gotta admire someone with that kind of breadth of honors.
 

iTool

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wow, awesome read. i may have to rent/buy some of his books now...
 

Ailleurs

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I've seen his books around. Just googled him.

stanford undergrad, harvard med, harvard mph, rhodes scholar, macarthur fellow, national book award finalist, staff writer for the new yorker...

what a freak...

But, wait! You must not forget:

  • After 2 years of med. school he chose to act as health care lieutenant to Clinton for his 1992 campaign.
  • Senior Advisor in the Dept. of Helath and Human Services after Clinton was elected president
  • Directed 1 out of 3 committees in the Clinton Health Care Task Force, supervising 75 people and defined benefits packages for Americans and subsidies and requirements for employers.

And then, he returned to finish medical school :laugh:

(source: http://www.iht.com/articles/1994/05/30/uo.php & wikipedia)

Amazing guy really! I always see his book, Better, at the Harvard COOP on display :D
 
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ImBrianFellows

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Thanks for posting this! I have read both of his books and they are among my favorite nonfiction reads. I didn't know all of that biographical information about him ... what an amazing guy!

Unfortunately armybound he is married. :(
 

chewsnuffles

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It can cause an air embolism and stop blood flow if it gets lodged in a vessel or the heart. Look up "air or gas embolism"

Uh, I'm no doctor, but I thought I read somewhere that the ONLY way for it to cause problems is for it to go to one of the heart chambers and to form an air bubble which would essential block the heart valve from letting blood go through it since there is now a negative air space where there was hydrolic pressure (like why you bleed your brakes on a car). Just how would it get "lodged" in a blood vessel?!?

Temporary treatment would be to turn the patient on their back or partially upside down so the bubble "rises" to a part of the chamber where it is harmless for the time being. I also heard that it takes a "significant" amount of air to actually do this.

I can't cite sources for this, so if I am wrong I would appreciate someone correcting me. Thanks.
 

Pedsbro

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Uh, I'm no doctor, but I thought I read somewhere that the ONLY way for it to cause problems is for it to go to one of the heart chambers and to form an air bubble which would essential block the heart valve from letting blood go through it since there is now a negative air space where there was hydrolic pressure (like why you bleed your brakes on a car). Just how would it get "lodged" in a blood vessel?!?

Temporary treatment would be to turn the patient on their back or partially upside down so the bubble "rises" to a part of the chamber where it is harmless for the time being. I also heard that it takes a "significant" amount of air to actually do this.

I can't cite sources for this, so if I am wrong I would appreciate someone correcting me. Thanks.

http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/uptodate/critical care/Embolic disease/Air embolism.htm

It can occur in the heart as well as vessels in the circulation. Consider yourself corrected.

Was it really worth bumping this month-old thread just for that? :rolleyes:
 

Sangria

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great article. I just read Complications and Better over break. I hope he has another book in the works
 

paramedtech

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Thanks for that link, that was a great article, he is an amazing writer.
 

TheElement

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Are there any other writers out there that are like him? I've read pretty much everything he has put out and I neeeed moreee.
 
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