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drtroy

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I have been reading a lot of posts lately of people thinking that going to a DO school is only an "option" if you have a lower GPA. What you people need to understand is that DO's are not only just as well trained as an MD but often have more training. DO's have a better bed side manner, care about the well being of patients more than regular MD's do. If you want to pursue a research oriented field then I say go to an allopathic school, but if you want to go into any primary care field then DO is the way to go. DO schools do not have lower standards as many people think, they just take more into account besides just grades and scores. They look at the individual as a whole, well rounded person which is what is the most important thing not grades and scores. You could have a person who makes straight A's and scores high on the mcat, but does that mean they will be a better physician than someone who does not have straight A's and high scores? Absolutely not.
 

PunkmedGirl

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I have been reading a lot of posts lately of people thinking that going to a DO school is only an "option" if you have a lower GPA. What you people need to understand is that DO's are not only just as well trained as an MD but often have more training. DO's have a better bed side manner, care about the well being of patients more than regular MD's do. If you want to pursue a research oriented field then I say go to an allopathic school, but if you want to go into any primary care field then DO is the way to go. DO schools do not have lower standards as many people think, they just take more into account besides just grades and scores. They look at the individual as a whole, well rounded person which is what is the most important thing not grades and scores. You could have a person who makes straight A's and scores high on the mcat, but does that mean they will be a better physician than someone who does not have straight A's and high scores? Absolutely not.



I completely agree with your post except one small tidbit and that's the misconception that DO's only can go into primary care which is false. MD=DO, you can pursue residency of any field of medicine to your liking and qualifications. Some fields of medicine are harder to match into then others but that is also true for MD as well.
 

NTF

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What you people need to understand is that DO's are not only just as well trained as an MD but often have more training. DO's have a better bed side manner, care about the well being of patients more than regular MD's do.

Hmmmmm...I'm all for DOs. But I find the insinuations that DOs are BETTER than MDs (rather than equal) a little hard to swallow.

More training... yes as far as OMM goes. Though most DOs don't actually use it and if you make it a large part of your practice the AOA would want you to do an OMM residency or fellowship.

Better bedside manner? Care about the well being of patients more? I don't buy it. Listen there are good DOs and good MDs, and crappy DOs and crappy MDs. I haven't seen anything that makes me think that DOs are somehow inherently better than MDs.

So as much as I roll my eyes at MDs who look down at DOs, I also roll my eyes at the DOs who have the proverbial chip on their shoulders about how DOs treat their patients better than all those cold, money-grubbing, numbers-only MDs.

Seriously, be a great DOCTOR. Get rid of the inferiority complex.
 
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Drtroy: you've been a member for two years so I'll assume you're not a time waster, and we'll give you the benefit of the doubt. However, please do not start an 'allopathic vs. osteopathic' thread---and especially in the nontraditional forum where many readers here actually do understand both styles of medical education. There is a sticky that clearly states this topic is futile, and against the rules of the forum you agreed to when you joined.

This is fair warning. If this thread spirals downward, it will be promptly closed, and you could lose your posting privileges. Thanks.
 
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dragonfly99

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Sorry, drtroy
but you just lost me.

I am an MD and proud of it. I just spent 10 years training for what I do. Nobody - not some DO, not some other MD - cares more about my patients than I do. You just insulted the hell out of me and my profession. Why don't you grow up and go do your job and quit trolling on message boards trying to pick a useless fight.. It's fine to be a DO or MD...neither one is necessarily "better". Adcoms at the 2 types of schools may differ in their selection criteria, just as different schools (even among all DO schools or all MD schools) differ. Applicants may prefer one type of school vs. the other. Most of your patients will not care which kind of med school you attended, as long as you are a good doctor.
 

PunkmedGirl

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Uhmm maybe I need to perfect my troll skills.:rolleyes: I over looked that part about DO's having a better bedside manner over MD's which I do not agree with at all. So I will retract my "I completely agree statement".:cool:
 
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