May 7, 2009
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Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Hi everyone.

I am open to any advices, input, suggestions, and etc!

I'm going into MPH department of

GWU - Maternal and Child Health
Emory - Behavior Sciences and Health Education

The Pros of going to GWU - is location-DC, 96% tuition waive if work within GWU, and strong department.

The Pros of going to Emory - possible workstudy with CDC, reputation and better ranking.

I went to both orientations and still not 100% convinced for a specific one.
any suggestions??
 
Jan 25, 2013
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Resurrecting this thread because I'm curious about the same thing. GWU or Emory??

I got accepted into GWU's Health Promotion (being considered for a merit scholarship) and Emory's BSHE.

I want to work with the API community, which isn't very big in either areas (though DC definitely has a more visible population), but I'm considering these schools as a training ground/network builder. GWU could offer connections with the government and plenty of opportunities for work experience while Emory could offer connections with CDC and is ranked higher.

Thoughts?
 
Nov 21, 2012
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You need to visit both campuses to get a feel of the fit. To my knowledge, without scholarships, GWU costs more, especially once living costs are factored in.
 
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364462

Resurrecting this thread because I'm curious about the same thing. GWU or Emory??

I got accepted into GWU's Health Promotion (being considered for a merit scholarship) and Emory's BSHE.

I want to work with the API community, which isn't very big in either areas (though DC definitely has a more visible population), but I'm considering these schools as a training ground/network builder. GWU could offer connections with the government and plenty of opportunities for work experience while Emory could offer connections with CDC and is ranked higher.

Thoughts?
My suggestion is to consider which is the "best match" and "goodness of fit" for you. (Caveat: I did not apply to either Emory or GWU.) Thereafter, things will fall into place. Look at their curriculum, and I do not mean a cursory glance at course listings. I mean, read the actual course descriptions for those classes you will have or will likely take. If available, get a sense of what career services is like in the schools. If a field placement/practicum is required for your chosen program, look at not only where students have gone but also what they did. (As an example, BU publishes a detailed listing of students' practicum experience, including where and what, written by the students themselves.) Also, if you want to work with the API community, I wonder if there are opportunities to learn more about or to work directly with people of color. Is there curriculum/coursework that addresses health disparity or multicultural issues, for instance? Is either program "better" at taking both a breadth and depth at these kinds of issues? I am Asian-American, and I, too, want to work with the API community (though in Asia/Western Pacific). There is a dearth of public health related material that takes a closer look at the needs of APIs. Can looking at the experiences of other people of color one way to "get at this" if indeed the API community is small in either location?

To be sure GWU and Emory have strong connections by virtue of their locations - as you have indicated, for the government in the former and for the CDC in the latter. However, I believe it is important to consider and reflect upon the chances of actually securing positions in these placements. This is where a practicum listing guide may be helpful. Knowing that a few students have secured a placement at the CDC may be encouraging. However, given that there are many students who vie for such positions, what is the strength and value of a school in its ability to facilitate such limited opportunity?

I am a big believer that if you go to the program that best matches your needs and goals so many other things will fall into place - and quite frankly, you will be happier.

Good luck!
 
Jan 18, 2013
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I didn't apply to GWU but I do live in DC currently, and cost of living is something you'll definitely want to consider. It's extremely expensive to live in the DC area. As a point of comparison, I was accepted to Emory and used a cost of living calculator (CNN and several other sites have them) to get an idea of how my expenses might change. My overall cost of living would decrease by 32%, and housing costs would decrease by 63%. Just some food for thought.
 
Jan 25, 2013
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My suggestion is to consider which is the "best match" and "goodness of fit" for you. (Caveat: I did not apply to either Emory or GWU.) Thereafter, things will fall into place. Look at their curriculum, and I do not mean a cursory glance at course listings. I mean, read the actual course descriptions for those classes you will have or will likely take. If available, get a sense of what career services is like in the schools. If a field placement/practicum is required for your chosen program, look at not only where students have gone but also what they did. (As an example, BU publishes a detailed listing of students' practicum experience, including where and what, written by the students themselves.) Also, if you want to work with the API community, I wonder if there are opportunities to learn more about or to work directly with people of color. Is there curriculum/coursework that addresses health disparity or multicultural issues, for instance? Is either program "better" at taking both a breadth and depth at these kinds of issues? I am Asian-American, and I, too, want to work with the API community (though in Asia/Western Pacific). There is a dearth of public health related material that takes a closer look at the needs of APIs. Can looking at the experiences of other people of color one way to "get at this" if indeed the API community is small in either location?

To be sure GWU and Emory have strong connections by virtue of their locations - as you have indicated, for the government in the former and for the CDC in the latter. However, I believe it is important to consider and reflect upon the chances of actually securing positions in these placements. This is where a practicum listing guide may be helpful. Knowing that a few students have secured a placement at the CDC may be encouraging. However, given that there are many students who vie for such positions, what is the strength and value of a school in its ability to facilitate such limited opportunity?

I am a big believer that if you go to the program that best matches your needs and goals so many other things will fall into place - and quite frankly, you will be happier.

Good luck!
Thanks for the insight! They each have an Asian Am professor with whom I spoke on the phone; now that I'm officially accepted I'll probably reach out to them again to gain additional information.

CDC placements are pretty common for Emory (their website says 20% of students get to work with federal agencies such as CDC) and they have a long list of previous places their students have had practicums. I'll follow up on your suggestion to find out what the students specifically did for both Emory and GWU. There are definitely opportunities to work with people of color at both locations. Another focus for me is adolescents, and both campuses have extracurricular programs that address at-risk students' health.

Also, I'll do some more digging to find out what their courses related to health disparities have to offer. I do know Emory has a certificate in socio-contextual determinants of health and GWU has a certificate in community-based program management which I guess is a matter of theory versus skills.

In response to what987's post: I visited Emory for their open house (since I had never been to Atlanta) but haven't had a chance to check out GW yet. I was considering attending their preview day on 3/23, but I'm not sure if I can afford the flight out to D.C. for the weekend.