• SDN Site Updates

    Hey everyone! The site will be down for approximately 2 hours on Thursday, August 5th for site updates.

  • How To ACE Your Medical School Interview

    In this webinar hosted by SDN with experts from BeMo Academic Consulting, you will learn a simple five-step process to help you translate your interview invitation into an acceptance.

Ineedhopenow

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Mar 11, 2011
158
7
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
How much would a family practitioner in private practice make if s/he only saw Medicare patients, saw patients 8 hours per day for 5 days a week? Let's say this physician worked 52 weeks a year (no vacations).*

Please don't include overhead costs.
 
Jan 21, 2006
13,223
6,870
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Please don't include overhead costs.

Kinda hard to answer the question, in that case. We'd also have to make some assumptions about coding accuracy. And, who works 52 weeks a year...?

You can look up Medicare's fees yourself here: http://www.cms.gov/apps/physician-fee-schedule/

Pick a state, as fees vary. Conservatively, I'd assume an even mix of 99213 and 99214 for outpatient visits. 99212, 99215 and new patient visits won't happen often enough to really worry them about for the purposes of an exercise like this. Realistically, someone treating exclusively adults >65 y/o would probably be seeing at least 75% 99214. You could make additional money seeing patients for Medicare's preventive services visits. These actually reimburse fairly well. Calculating only physician-generated E&M charges is also ignoring any in-office procedures which could be accomplished during the visit and billed using modifier 25, nurse-only visits (99211) for education, vaccinations, INR monitoring, etc.

20-25 patients is probably a good average for an 8-hour day.
 
Last edited:

NotFromHere

New Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 3, 2008
2
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
If you did nursing home work, which varies in availability by region, but in some areas is in very high need, you would be able to collect 80% of medicare for all patients, and 100% for some of the patients with coinsurance. Your overhead costs would be about 10-20% as you would not need to rent an office or hire staff to answer phones and put people in rooms, etc. There are people doing very well in this line of work, though it is not for everyone. It is a way to start out in practice if you need cash flow to start, and enjoy interacting with older people. Some people make a career out of this and become medical directors, and do hospice management as well. If you do hospice for a period of time, you will be eligible to write the board exam which can open more doors to you. Most nursing home patients are in need of high quality compassionate care and this is not always available to them.
 
About the Ads

ghost dog

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2008
830
5
Kazakhstan
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
How much would a family practitioner in private practice make if s/he only saw Medicare patients, saw patients 8 hours per day for 5 days a week? Let's say this physician worked 52 weeks a year (no vacations).*

Please don't include overhead costs.

Why wouldn't overhead costs be considered?

Medical students and residents need more business acumen. This needs to be taught in med school, or at least in residency. Honestly: "Business 101" could be taught in less than a day.

I could have saved a nice little bundle if I had opened up my practice at the beginning instead of working for someone else. The greedy idiot I worked for ( a doctor / clinic manager ) was the worst.

This person thought it was reasonable to clean patient washrooms once a week.
 

JustPlainBill

Attending
10+ Year Member
Jan 5, 2007
2,565
2,954
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Really difficult to answer the post as BD pointed out -- More about clinic flow and level of visit than numbers.....If you do strictly Geri Medicare and do it right, you can get away with about 8 patients per half day as 99214's or so I'm told. And if you've never seen 8 Geri patients back to back, it takes some work, especially when they dump their Wal-mart bag full of medications onto the exam room counter and then want to spend 2 minutes per pill bottle, peering at them and wanting to discuss what they do and why they're taking them....good luck with that. Throw in a language barrier and you'll get dwell times in the 60minute range, easy.

Good medicine is hard to do well at the primary care level. That's why no one wants to go into it. It's hard work, you have to be efficient and know your stuff. Not everyone can do it.

Personally - I'm probably going to work for a Doc-in-the-Box for a year or two to get my feet on the ground and get some real-world (i.e. non-academia nut residency) experience. I may continue that to allow me to do what I'm passionate about -- those people who have insurance but work hourly jobs and lose money every time they come to the doctor.....i'm planning on keeping odd hours just for them...plus the local GIs and their families.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 9 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.