WenfeiX

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Hi all,

I'm considering the HPSP scholarship but haven't actually spoken with a recruiter yet. I'm a little wary of how much objective information I would be able to get out of him or her as compared to people who have actually gone through the experience themselves.

I will be graduating from college this year (plan to take a year off), have a 36R, 3.9 GPA, so I think that if I applied for the HPSP, I would have a good shot at getting it in whichever branch I would want? My question is - I've heard from my friends (who go to Westpoint, USAFA, and Naval Academy) that females are treated differently between the three branches? I know that if I asked recruiters that question, they would have to say, "Absolutely not," but is there any truth to that outside of the academies? Any comments on being a minority in the military (I'm Asian-American)?

Are there any female doctors who post on this (or even medical students/residents) who could comment on their experiences, how things work with family planning (what happens if you get pregnant...do you get paid time off and maternity leave?) Also, I know that in the Navy, females are not allowed on submarines - is that true for ships too?

Please feel free to message me if you have any advice/comments/links to other posts. Since I'm taking a year off, I guess I have a long time to think about this, but it's a huge decision to make, so I'd like to have as much information and time as possible. Thanks so much!
 

militarymd

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WenfeiX said:
Hi all,

I'm considering the HPSP scholarship but haven't actually spoken with a recruiter yet. I'm a little wary of how much objective information I would be able to get out of him or her as compared to people who have actually gone through the experience themselves.

I will be graduating from college this year (plan to take a year off), have a 36R, 3.9 GPA, so I think that if I applied for the HPSP, I would have a good shot at getting it in whichever branch I would want? My question is - I've heard from my friends (who go to Westpoint, USAFA, and Naval Academy) that females are treated differently between the three branches? I know that if I asked recruiters that question, they would have to say, "Absolutely not," but is there any truth to that outside of the academies? Any comments on being a minority in the military (I'm Asian-American)?

Are there any female doctors who post on this (or even medical students/residents) who could comment on their experiences, how things work with family planning (what happens if you get pregnant...do you get paid time off and maternity leave?) Also, I know that in the Navy, females are not allowed on submarines - is that true for ships too?

Please feel free to message me if you have any advice/comments/links to other posts. Since I'm taking a year off, I guess I have a long time to think about this, but it's a huge decision to make, so I'd like to have as much information and time as possible. Thanks so much!
Females are treated no differently in the military then in the civilian world. If anything, there is LESS discrimination in the work environment.
 

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WenfeiX said:
Hi all,

I'm considering the HPSP scholarship but haven't actually spoken with a recruiter yet. I'm a little wary of how much objective information I would be able to get out of him or her as compared to people who have actually gone through the experience themselves.

I will be graduating from college this year (plan to take a year off), have a 36R, 3.9 GPA, so I think that if I applied for the HPSP, I would have a good shot at getting it in whichever branch I would want? My question is - I've heard from my friends (who go to Westpoint, USAFA, and Naval Academy) that females are treated differently between the three branches? I know that if I asked recruiters that question, they would have to say, "Absolutely not," but is there any truth to that outside of the academies? Any comments on being a minority in the military (I'm Asian-American)?

Are there any female doctors who post on this (or even medical students/residents) who could comment on their experiences, how things work with family planning (what happens if you get pregnant...do you get paid time off and maternity leave?) Also, I know that in the Navy, females are not allowed on submarines - is that true for ships too?

Please feel free to message me if you have any advice/comments/links to other posts. Since I'm taking a year off, I guess I have a long time to think about this, but it's a huge decision to make, so I'd like to have as much information and time as possible. Thanks so much!
Females are definitely on ships, but there are ships that are only males-not just submarines. You do get paid time off and maternity leave and if you are pregnant you do not deploy.
 

efex101

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Right but beware as soon as you come off maternity leave (cannot exactly remember but maybe two months) you *are* deployable just fyi. The military route is great for women if done for the right reasons and not to "just" pay for medical school. There is the possibility of deplyong with family or not depending on where you are going...and the way things are now you can pretty much assume that you may be going to a less than desirable place. I loved the military but with a family it *is* pretty insane because you really have ZERO control of where and when you deploy.
 

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There is less room for discrimination in the military...regardless of gender, age, race, ethnicity. Not much affirmative action in the military. If you can do the job it's yours till you prove otherwise. The equality will seem "unfair" after delivery. No one will care that you have a newborn at home...you have a job to do. Make arrangements for childcare while you're deployed, you'll need to be prepared because deployments will happen.

Do HPSP because you want military medicine and all the good, bad, & ugly to go with it.
 
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WenfeiX

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Croooz said:
Do HPSP because you want military medicine and all the good, bad, & ugly to go with it.
Hrmmm...after staying up all night and reading through the majority of threads (they're riveting...really), it definitely seems there is a lot of bad and ugly that I had not even thought about (GME being a big one)...leaving out the "how am I going to have kids and raise a family as a civilian doctor...not to mention a military doctor." Of course the part where I take care of men and women in the service is still very, very good.

So, I'm 21 and single now, don't really have a clue as to what I'll want to do during my year off immediately after graduation (4 months away), much less 4, 8, 12 years down the road. I have an interest in being involved in academic medicine. I can see myself going into some sort of subspecialty. I'm curious to see what the recruiters will say when I bring up all of these points. :)

And by the way...thanks so much for everyone's input into this forum. It's soooo incredibly helpful. I can't imagine considering the scholarship without this kind of resource at my fingertips...I *heart* the internet.
 

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I would have to 2nd the opinion that females are treated very fairly in the military. My disclaimer is being a medical student who's only done 2 military rotations. With that being said, I've seen many a female physician and resident interact with other male colleagues. I would have to say that the day in day out of being a female doctor in the military is pretty good. I found that all the male doctors are very courteous and polite. Frankly, I have found that the environment in a military hospital is at least 10 fold better than in a civilian hospital. (I don't have a courtesy gauge, but take that what it's worth) The nurses are polite to the residents. The techs are polite as well. In return, the residents and attendings are polite to them. It honestly is a welcome change.

Now, as a female physician you can become nondeployable fairly easily. All it takes is the matter of getting pregnant. In my short time on military rotations I have seen and heard about it on two occasions.
 

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I would weigh your desire to raise a family and it's likelihood to whether or not you should join. I don't know of a SINGLE female physician who has retired from the military...not a one. This isn't to say they don't exist but in my 10 years active, 2 reserve, and 5 civilized (govt contractor) I still don't know of one.

Every single female military physician I know or know of has gotten out after their payback. I can't give a percentage but I can say that 4 in the last 2 years got out to begin families and take a break from practising medicine till the baby was at least 5. One I know is still doing this, the others I didn't keep in touch with.

The above shouldn't be used to make a final decision but what I would do is ask the recruiter for female physician contacts...keeping what you've read in mind. If you meet any female physicians pick their brains apart. Please! Do this if given the oppurtunity! I set up an informal lunch for some USUHS interviewees and they were no shows. This has jaded me to how much HPSP & USUHS interviewees truly want to know about the military.

Good luck and keep us posted. The military is a great life for those that can deal with it. It's hard on men with families and even harder for active duty mothers.
 
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WenfeiX

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Croooz said:
The above shouldn't be used to make a final decision but what I would do is ask the recruiter for female physician contacts...keeping what you've read in mind. If you meet any female physicians pick their brains apart. Please! Do this if given the oppurtunity! I set up an informal lunch for some USUHS interviewees and they were no shows. This has jaded me to how much HPSP & USUHS interviewees truly want to know about the military.
Do you think that the recruiters would give me a "select" list of people to contact? Or am I just being uber paranoid? Also, if anyone does have contact information of active duty female physicians that I could talk to, that would be greatly appreciated. In-person would be great, but I'm in the Bay Area, and the nearest military base that I can think of is Travis AFB, and that's even a long drive's away. I'm from the Ft. Leavenworth area, but haven't been back there in a while because of school so I don't know too many people who are still stationed there.
 

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My gut says the recruiter will give you a "select" list...that's IF they give you a list at all. I don't have a single female you could call...sorry.
 

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Croooz said:
I would weigh your desire to raise a family and it's likelihood to whether or not you should join. I don't know of a SINGLE female physician who has retired from the military...not a one. This isn't to say they don't exist but in my 10 years active, 2 reserve, and 5 civilized (govt contractor) I still don't know of one.

Every single female military physician I know or know of has gotten out after their payback. I can't give a percentage but I can say that 4 in the last 2 years got out to begin families and take a break from practising medicine till the baby was at least 5. One I know is still doing this, the others I didn't keep in touch with.

The above shouldn't be used to make a final decision but what I would do is ask the recruiter for female physician contacts...keeping what you've read in mind. If you meet any female physicians pick their brains apart. Please! Do this if given the oppurtunity! I set up an informal lunch for some USUHS interviewees and they were no shows. This has jaded me to how much HPSP & USUHS interviewees truly want to know about the military.

Good luck and keep us posted. The military is a great life for those that can deal with it. It's hard on men with families and even harder for active duty mothers.

I know of plenty of female physicians who have retired. But then again I'm a pathologist and we have plenty of full birds circling the roost here. It's a pretty sweet gig...

To answer the question: in my personal opinion... the medical corps and hospital atmosphere in the military is a gender-friendly environment.

Advice: Before you decide, make an effort to talk to some female docs who are in a specialty that you *might* have interest in. Call a medcen with a residency program, ask for that department, and ask to speak with a resident. I can't imagine that anyone would not want to talk with you.
 

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DrBloodmoney said:
I know of plenty of female physicians who have retired. But then again I'm a pathologist and we have plenty of full birds circling the roost here. It's a pretty sweet gig...

To answer the question: in my personal opinion... the medical corps and hospital atmosphere in the military is a gender-friendly environment.

Advice: Before you decide, make an effort to talk to some female docs who are in a specialty that you *might* have interest in. Call a medcen with a residency program, ask for that department, and ask to speak with a resident. I can't imagine that anyone would not want to talk with you.
I guess I should preface that my areas have been EM, Gen. Surg & Tranplant surgery. This isn't to say there aren't female physicians retiring in these specialties...I just didn't run into any. Everyone last one was running for the hills.
 

qqq

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WenfeiX said:
Hi all,

I'm considering the HPSP scholarship but haven't actually spoken with a recruiter yet. I'm a little wary of how much objective information I would be able to get out of him or her as compared to people who have actually gone through the experience themselves.

I will be graduating from college this year (plan to take a year off), have a 36R, 3.9 GPA, so I think that if I applied for the HPSP, I would have a good shot at getting it in whichever branch I would want? My question is - I've heard from my friends (who go to Westpoint, USAFA, and Naval Academy) that females are treated differently between the three branches? I know that if I asked recruiters that question, they would have to say, "Absolutely not," but is there any truth to that outside of the academies? Any comments on being a minority in the military (I'm Asian-American)?

Are there any female doctors who post on this (or even medical students/residents) who could comment on their experiences, how things work with family planning (what happens if you get pregnant...do you get paid time off and maternity leave?) Also, I know that in the Navy, females are not allowed on submarines - is that true for ships too?

Please feel free to message me if you have any advice/comments/links to other posts. Since I'm taking a year off, I guess I have a long time to think about this, but it's a huge decision to make, so I'd like to have as much information and time as possible. Thanks so much!
Why do you want to be in the military anyway? Why don't you just do your training and stuff, and then when you have had all the school you can handle, join the military for a year and see if you like it. HPSP, as I'm sure you know from this chat board, is just a huge as$ commitment and you have awesome stats. Why limit your opportunities by going in the military? YOu can always join later if you still want to serve. The military isn't going anywhere . . . well, except to the middle east. . . Were you the girl I interviewed with at USUHS during the oct-nov time frame last year that said all the people inteviewing at USUHS that day looked old?
 
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WenfeiX

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qqq said:
Why do you want to be in the military anyway?
Someone posted in another thread "Chicks dig the summer whites." I'm hoping that "dudes" do so too. ;)

Lots of reasons...some stemming from one of those "gut feelings"-type things, some not. I don't have family who are prior service, but I grew up surrounded by the military, interacted with soldiers everday, went to school with Army brats, and my best friends are officers in the various branches, so I've had a very, very tiny and limited look of what it's like. I'm still thinking and doing lots of soul-searching on this one...maybe I'll make a spreadsheet.

Were you the girl I interviewed with at USUHS during the oct-nov time frame last year that said all the people inteviewing at USUHS that day looked old?
Nope...wasn't me.
 

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WenfeiX said:
Do you think that the recruiters would give me a "select" list of people to contact? Or am I just being uber paranoid? Also, if anyone does have contact information of active duty female physicians that I could talk to, that would be greatly appreciated. In-person would be great, but I'm in the Bay Area, and the nearest military base that I can think of is Travis AFB, and that's even a long drive's away. I'm from the Ft. Leavenworth area, but haven't been back there in a while because of school so I don't know too many people who are still stationed there.
Call up David Grant Medical Center at Travis AFB, talk to either the GME folks or someone in the head-shed, and make arrangements to talk to some female docs. Make the drive out there, see the facilities, talk to residents. Take the time, go in person, ask all your questions. It's that important a decision.
 

bobbyseal

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denali said:
Call up David Grant Medical Center at Travis AFB, talk to either the GME folks or someone in the head-shed, and make arrangements to talk to some female docs. Make the drive out there, see the facilities, talk to residents. Take the time, go in person, ask all your questions. It's that important a decision.
This is a great point. Most of the major medical centers have GME offices. I'm sure they could get you hooked up with one of their interns or residents to talk to you for a bit. Just find the medical center information desk line, then get the # for the GME office. Talk to one of the nice people there, and voila you're ready to rock.
 

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WenfeiX said:
I have an interest in being involved in academic medicine. I can see myself going into some sort of subspecialty. I'm curious to see what the recruiters will say when I bring up all of these points. :)
The recuiters will say whatever you want to hear regardless of how true it is in reality. Most of them have little experience with the medical side of this. Yes, if you ask for military contacts they will give you a very select list.

So, you're interested in academic medicine and subspecialization eh? Remember that the military will not grant you time to persue research, either in your summers during medical school or to take a year off, like many interested in academics will do in med school. This is why I know medical school administrators who discourage applicants from applying for HPSP. Why take a student to an academic medical school when they can't take full advantage of what it is to offer? Further, good luck getting the fellowship of your choice in this time of great demand for practicioners. You may find that you have to put off fellowship indefinately because the military won't grant you your fellowship, and unfortunately, most who put that off never come back to it. In the current environment you will most likely be 100% a practicioner in the military, depending on your specialty, and this means while you're in the military you probably won't get to spend time doing research or teaching. The first four years of your career are very important for setting yourself up for bigger and better things in the civilian world, and you'll probably find that military time won't help your resume as far as academics go, simply because you won't be spending your time at an academic center teaching and doing research.
 

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Neuronix said:
you will most likely be 100% a practicioner in the military, depending on your specialty, and this means while you're in the military you probably won't get to spend time doing research or teaching.
Well, like everything else that depends. If you are at Walter Reed, Madigan, Tripler, Brooke or a variety of the smaller training hospitals (Eisenhower, Darnall, Beaumont, Womack, etc etc) you will be *expected* to teach residents. Not to mention USUHS and the teaching/research opportunities there. Military personnel also do research at the NIH-- I know firsthand some peds heme-onc docs who recently started back into clinical medicine after doing bench-research.

research and teaching is there for those that desire it.

--your friendly neighborhood academic center caveman
 

militarymd

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Homunculus said:
Well, like everything else that depends. If you are at Walter Reed, Madigan, Tripler, Brooke or a variety of the smaller training hospitals (Eisenhower, Darnall, Beaumont, Womack, etc etc) you will be *expected* to teach residents. Not to mention USUHS and the teaching/research opportunities there. Military personnel also do research at the NIH-- I know firsthand some peds heme-onc docs who recently started back into clinical medicine after doing bench-research.

research and teaching is there for those that desire it.

--your friendly neighborhood academic center caveman
I read a lot of journals....NEJM, Chest, Cirulation, Annals of Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, American Journal of Respiratory/CCM....well you get the point....

I don't see a lot of journal articles published by the military....let me rephrase, I think I might of seen 2 articles that involved the military in the last 5 years.....where's all this research being published?
 

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militarymd said:
I read a lot of journals....NEJM, Chest, Cirulation, Annals of Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, American Journal of Respiratory/CCM....well you get the point....

I don't see a lot of journal articles published by the military....let me rephrase, I think I might of seen 2 articles that involved the military in the last 5 years.....where's all this research being published?
Neuro...100% military medicine? Not true. If you want to do research it can be done especially in Maryland. It won't be easy but it is possible, doable and being done.

I work in military research and your statements just aren't true. Hell...I'm on 5 publications, 1 being with NEJM. The group I'm with now has just started to publish but that is because of the nature of their research. With the new group they've formed they are able to publish so some stuff should be coming out within the next year or two.
 

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Croooz said:
Neuro...100% military medicine? Not true. If you want to do research it can be done especially in Maryland. It won't be easy but it is possible, doable and being done.

I work in military research and your statements just aren't true. Hell...I'm on 5 publications, 1 being with NEJM. The group I'm with now has just started to publish but that is because of the nature of their research. With the new group they've formed they are able to publish so some stuff should be coming out within the next year or two.
I read NEJM and I see WRAMC papers all the time. They're mostly infectious disease papers about vaccines or rare/weird stuff troops overseas get. If that sounds good to you, you could still do that work in the civilian world.

The info I'm talking about comes from the GME people. Getting a good billet at an academic place isn't easy, and so in many specialties you should expect to be in the middle of nowhere working 12+ hours/day (didn't you say something similar in a different thread Croooz?). The GME people would say "Well, we don't like people teaching right out of residency" which is BS for "We need people for the middle of nowhere" IMO. Good luck getting that academic billet, and after how long in the service? Unless you're lucky enough to pick and get a residency/fellowship that puts you into academics or major locations. Further, what about deployments? I and the OBC cadets hear all the time about how EVERYONE is deployable these days. "Oops, I'm going to Iraq, so I guess all that research I'm doing will have to go to someone else for the next 9 months." That just doesn't happen in the civilian world.
 

militarymd

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Croooz said:
Neuro...100% military medicine? Not true. If you want to do research it can be done especially in Maryland. It won't be easy but it is possible, doable and being done.

I work in military research and your statements just aren't true. Hell...I'm on 5 publications, 1 being with NEJM. The group I'm with now has just started to publish but that is because of the nature of their research. With the new group they've formed they are able to publish so some stuff should be coming out within the next year or two.
reference please.
 

militarymd

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militarymd said:
reference please.
and we can leave out the Iraq war stuff...I'm talking regular research that comes out of other academic institutions.
 

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Acadmic work is going to be difficult...there is USUHS and a couple of other places...please focus on "couple" there aren't that many. I still do not recommend the military if research is where you're heart is...you can be exposed to it MAINLY if you're in NNMC, WRAMC, WRAIR, USAMRIID...basically the DC area and it's Maryland & Virginia suburbs.

You're right Neuro I don't recommend anyone join the military if research is what they are after. Unless for some strange reason you enjoy the research the military does...which I haven't run into anyone who does it willingly...usually something "they" fell into liking but not their first passion. I haven't met any physicians who came in with the desire to do the kind of research the military does...PhD's yes but that being said you would be shocked at what some of that research is. If research is your thing then it would pay to RESEARCH the kind of research the military is doing...you just might like it....maybe :rolleyes:
 

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militarymd said:
and we can leave out the Iraq war stuff...I'm talking regular research that comes out of other academic institutions.
No problem...I'll do a search and post it tomorrow. Mind you it's just what I've been involved in...I'll see about a more indepth search. This isn't Iraq stuff..we aren't doing that...perhaps that is why funding drying up... :rolleyes:
 

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MilMD,
Here are the ones I was involved with.



Effects of combined treatment with CD25- and CD154-specific monoclonal antibodies in non-human primate allotransplantation.
Am J Transplant. 2003 Nov;3(11):1350-4.

Results from a human renal allograft tolerance trial evaluating the humanized CD52-specific monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab (CAMPATH-1H).
Transplantation. 2003 Jul 15;76(1):120-9.

Porcine CD80: cloning, characterization, and evidence for its role in direct human T-cell activation.
Xenotransplantation. 2003 May;10(3):252-8.

Studies investigating pretransplant donor-specific blood transfusion, rapamycin, and the CD154-specific antibody IDEC-131 in a nonhuman primate model of skin allotransplantation.
J Immunol. 2003 Mar 1;170(5):2776-82.

Combination induction therapy with monoclonal antibodies specific for CD80, CD86, and CD154 in nonhuman primate renal transplantation.
Transplantation. 2002 Nov 27;74(10):1365-9.

Humanized anti-CD154 antibody therapy for the treatment of allograft rejection in nonhuman primates.
Transplantation. 2002 Oct 15;74(7):940-3.

Efficacy and toxicity of a protocol using sirolimus, tacrolimus and daclizumab in a nonhuman primate renal allotransplant model.
Am J Transplant. 2002 Apr;2(4):381-5.

Human platelets activate porcine endothelial cells through a CD154-dependent pathway.
Transplantation. 2001 Dec 15;72(11):1858-61.

Treatment with the humanized CD154-specific monoclonal antibody, hu5C8, prevents acute rejection of primary skin allografts in nonhuman primates.
Transplantation. 2001 Nov 15;72(9):1473-8.

Induction therapy with monoclonal antibodies specific for CD80 and CD86 delays the onset of acute renal allograft rejection in non-human primates.
Transplantation. 2001 Aug 15;72(3):377-84.

The role of CD154 in organ transplant rejection and acceptance.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2001 May 29;356(1409):691-702. Review.

Primate skin allotransplantation with anti-CD154 monotherapy.
Transplant Proc. 2001 Feb-Mar;33(1-2):675-6. No abstract available.

Costimulatory molecules are active in the human xenoreactive T-cell response but not in natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity.
Transplantation. 2000 Jul 15;70(1):162-7.

CD40 ligand (CD154) triggers a short-term CD4(+) T cell activation response that results in secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines and apoptosis.
J Exp Med. 2000 Feb 21;191(4):651-60.

Treatment with humanized monoclonal antibody against CD154 prevents acute renal allograft rejection in nonhuman primates.
Nat Med. 1999 Jun;5(6):686-93.
 
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The research that I'm interested in and that I've been involved with so far (thermoregulation and performance) is actually funded by DARPA, so perhaps I could be optimistic that I would be able to continue it in the military medicine world? Of course, I would need time to do research, and I probably wouldn't have too much time if I'm not allowed to take time off or if I'm asked to go on a ship or Ft. Middle of Nowhere.
 

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DARPA, very cool stuff going on there. What is the project?
 

militarymd

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Croooz said:
MilMD,
Here are the ones I was involved with.



Effects of combined treatment with CD25- and CD154-specific monoclonal antibodies in non-human primate allotransplantation.
Am J Transplant. 2003 Nov;3(11):1350-4.

Results from a human renal allograft tolerance trial evaluating the humanized CD52-specific monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab (CAMPATH-1H).
Transplantation. 2003 Jul 15;76(1):120-9.

Porcine CD80: cloning, characterization, and evidence for its role in direct human T-cell activation.
Xenotransplantation. 2003 May;10(3):252-8.

Studies investigating pretransplant donor-specific blood transfusion, rapamycin, and the CD154-specific antibody IDEC-131 in a nonhuman primate model of skin allotransplantation.
J Immunol. 2003 Mar 1;170(5):2776-82.

Combination induction therapy with monoclonal antibodies specific for CD80, CD86, and CD154 in nonhuman primate renal transplantation.
Transplantation. 2002 Nov 27;74(10):1365-9.

Humanized anti-CD154 antibody therapy for the treatment of allograft rejection in nonhuman primates.
Transplantation. 2002 Oct 15;74(7):940-3.

Efficacy and toxicity of a protocol using sirolimus, tacrolimus and daclizumab in a nonhuman primate renal allotransplant model.
Am J Transplant. 2002 Apr;2(4):381-5.

Human platelets activate porcine endothelial cells through a CD154-dependent pathway.
Transplantation. 2001 Dec 15;72(11):1858-61.

Treatment with the humanized CD154-specific monoclonal antibody, hu5C8, prevents acute rejection of primary skin allografts in nonhuman primates.
Transplantation. 2001 Nov 15;72(9):1473-8.

Induction therapy with monoclonal antibodies specific for CD80 and CD86 delays the onset of acute renal allograft rejection in non-human primates.
Transplantation. 2001 Aug 15;72(3):377-84.

The role of CD154 in organ transplant rejection and acceptance.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2001 May 29;356(1409):691-702. Review.

Primate skin allotransplantation with anti-CD154 monotherapy.
Transplant Proc. 2001 Feb-Mar;33(1-2):675-6. No abstract available.

Costimulatory molecules are active in the human xenoreactive T-cell response but not in natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity.
Transplantation. 2000 Jul 15;70(1):162-7.

CD40 ligand (CD154) triggers a short-term CD4(+) T cell activation response that results in secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines and apoptosis.
J Exp Med. 2000 Feb 21;191(4):651-60.

Treatment with humanized monoclonal antibody against CD154 prevents acute renal allograft rejection in nonhuman primates.
Nat Med. 1999 Jun;5(6):686-93.
Ok, Nice list.....None of the journals are ones that I listed on my reading list. Where is the NEJM one that you mentioned?

Are any of the authors even military physicians? I looked up the articles on Pubmed.....Most of them list NIH as the originating institution...One from NMRI...not many AD physicians stationed there. One from WRAMC....one of 2 or 3 ? transplant centers in the military?
 

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militarymd said:
I don't see a lot of journal articles published by the military....let me rephrase, I think I might of seen 2 articles that involved the military in the last 5 years.....where's all this research being published?
here's recently published stuff relevant to orthopedics:

2002 Publications:

MAJ ROMNEY C. ANDERSEN, MD
Lehman RA, Kuklo TR, Andersen RC, Belmont PJ, and Polly DW. Advantage of Pedicle Screw Fixation Directed in the Apex of the Sacral Promontory Versus Bicortical Fixation: A Biomechanical Analysis. Spine 2002;27:806-811.

Publications (Submitted)
Andersen RC, Lehman RA, Kuklo TR, Murphy KP. Compartment Syndrome without Arterial Injury Following Knee Dislocation. Clin Orthop (April 2002).

MAJ JOHN A. BOJESCAL, MD
"PCA Total Hip Arthroplasty Inserted without Cement: 15-Year Follow-up." John A. Bojescul MD, John S. Xenos MD, John J. Callaghan MD and Carlton G. Savory MD. Accepted for publication in Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

CPT AMAN DHAWAN, MD
Dhawan A, Hospodar PP. Isolated Posttraumatic Posterior Dislocation of the Radial Head in an adult: a Case Report and Review of the Literature. The American Journal of Orthopedics 2002; 2:83-86.

Belmont PJ Jr., Dhawan A, Swallow CE, Shawen SB, Klemme WR, Polly DW Jr. Thoracic Myelopathy Due to Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum: A Case Report. In Review, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research.

Dhawan A, Doukas WC, Papazis JA, Scoville CR. Use of Postoperative Drain in Arthroscopically Assited Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone ACL Reconstruction. In Review, The American Journal of Sports Medicine.

Dhawan A, Doukas WC. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Foot Following an Ankle Sprain with Disruption of the Anterior Tibial Artery, A Case Report. In Review, The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Dhawan, A, Svoboda SJ, McHale KA. Tibial malrotation after injury triggers changes in kinetic chain. Biomechanics, July 2002.

LTC WILLIAM C. DOUKAS, MD
Doukas WC. Use of Postoperative Drain in Arthroscopically Assisted Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. American Journal of Sports Medicine. Accepted (pending revisions).

Doukas WC. Clavicle fractures and sternoclavicular dislocations. Orthopaedic Knowledge Update: Shoulder and Elbow 2. 2002.

Doukas WC. Acute compartment syndrome of the food following an ankle sprain with disruption of the anterior tibial artery - a case report. Submitted to Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

MAJ JOHN J. FAILLACE, MD
Faillace JJ, Bagg RJ. "Pediatric Lower Extremity Surgery Using a Hand Table." Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics. In press.

CPT BRETT A. FREEDMAN, MD
Freedman B, Shah S, Lau A. Metronidazole-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy. Journal of Applied Therapeutic Research - in print.

Freedman B, Mair E. Major General Streit - the First Military Otolaryngologist, Journal of Military Medicine - in print.

CPT KEVIN L. KIRK, MD
Tis J, Klemme WR, Kirk KL, Murphy KP, Cunningham B. Braided Hamstring Tendons in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Biomechanical Analysis. American Journal of Sports Medicine (in press)

CPT RONALD A. LEHMAN, Jr., MD
Lehman RA, Kuklo TR, Andersen RC, Belmont PJ, and Polly DW. Advantage of Pedicle Screw Fixation Directed in the Apex of the Sacral Promontory versus Bicortical Fixation: A Biomechanical Analysis. Spine 2002;27:806-811.

Lehman RA, Murphy KP, Machen MS, and Kuklo, TR. Modified Arthroscopic Suture Fixation of a Displaced Tibial Eminence Frature: A Case Report. J Arthroscopy (July/August, In Press).

Lehman RA and Kuklo TR. Biomechanics of Thoracic Pedicle Screws. Seminars in Spine Surgery (In Press).

Kuklo TR and Lehman RA. Perils and Pitfalls of Thoracic Pedicle Screws. Seminars in Spine Surgery (In Press).

Publications (submitted)
Lehman RA, Polly DW, Kuklo KR, Cunningham BC, Kirk KL, Belmont PJ. Advantage of Straight-Forward Trajectory for Placement of Thoracic Pedicle Screws: A Biomechanical Analysis. Spine (April 2002)

Lehman RA, Potter KP, Kuklo TR, Orchowski JO, Polly DW, Change AS. Pedicle Probing for Detection of Thoracic Pedicle Screw Violation(s): Is it Valid? Spine (April 2002)

Kuklo TR, Lehman RA. Advantage of Undertapping for Placement of Thoracic Pedicle Screws: A Biomechanical Analysis. Spine (April 2002).

Lehman RA and Kuklo TR. Use of Anatomic Saigittal Trajectory for Salvage of Failed/Violated Thoracic Pedice Screws. Spine (April 2002)

Andersen RC, Lehman RA, Kuklo TR, Murphy KP. Compartment Syndrome without Arterial Injury Following Knee Dislocation. Clin Orthop (April 2002).

Book Chapters
Murphy KP, Lehman RA. Arthroscopic Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis, Miller and Cole, Diagnostic and Operative Arthroscopy, Mosby. (In Review)

LTC TIMOTHY R. KUKLO, MD, JD
Long J, Lewis SJ, Kuklo TR, Zhu Y, Riew KD. The Effect of Cox-2 Inhibitors on Spinal Fusion. J Bone Joint Surg. (In Press)

Graham E, Kuklo TR, Kyriakos R, Rubin P, Riew KD. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Atlantoaxial Joint. J Bone Joint Surg (In Press)

Lehman RA, Kuklo TR, Belmont PJ, Andersen RC, Polly DW. Advantage of Pedicle Screw Directed into the Apex of the Sacral Promontory versus Bicortical Fixation: A Biomechanical Analysis. Spine 2002;27:806-811.

Lehman RA, Murphy KP, Machen MS, Kuklo TR. Modified Arthroscopic Suture Fixation of a Displaced Tibial Eminence Fracture: A Case Report. Arthroscopy (In Press)

Kuklo TR, Lenke LG, Graham EJ, Won DS, Sweet FA, Blanke KM, Bridwell KH. Correlation of Radiographic, Clinical and Patient Assessment of Shoulder Balance Following Fusion Versus Non-fusion of the Proximal Thoracic Curve in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis. Spine (In Press)

Publications (invited)
Kuklo TR, Polly DW. Surgical Anatomy of the Thoracic Pedicle. Seminars in Spine Surgery, 2002:14(1).

Lehman RA, Kuklo TR, O'Brien MF. Biomechanics of Thoracic Pedicle Screws: Part I. Seminars in Spine Surgery, 2002:14(1).

O'Brien M, Smith DAB, Kuklo TR. Biomechanics of Thoracic Fixation in Deformity: Hooks vs. Screws: Part II. Seminars in Spine Surgery, 2002:14(1).

Kuklo TR, Lehman RA. Perils and Pitfalls of Thoracic Pedicle Screws. Seminars in Spine Surgery, 2002:14(1).

Book Chapters
Polly DW, Kuklo TR. Non-operative Management of Thoracolumbar Fractures, Techniques in Fracture Surgery, Mosby. (In Press)

Riew KD, Kuklo TR. Surgical Approaches to the Cervical Spine. Scoliosis Research Society Core Curriculum, SRS publication/Lippincott.

Riew KD, Kuklo TR, Lenke LG. Halo and Cervical Traction. Scoliosis Research Society Core Curriculum, SRS publication/Lippincott.

Riew KD, Kuklo TR. Cervical Decompression. Scoliosis Research Society Core Curriculum, SRS publication/Lippincott.

Polly DW, Kuklo TR. Perioperative Blood and Blood Product Management for Spinal Deformity Surgery. Scoliosis Research Society Core Curriculum, SRS publication/Lippincott.

Polly DW, Kuklo TR. Placement of Thoracic Pedicle Screws. Progress in Neuorlogical Surgery: Advances in Spinal Stabilization. Karger (In Press)

Polly DW, Kuklo TR. General Considerations for Surgical Preparation for Adult Deformity Surgery. The Adult Spine, 3d Edition.

Kuklo TR, Polly DW. Pediatric Kyphosis. The Adult Spine, 3d Edition.

Kuklo TR, Riew KD. Approached to the Upper Cervical Spine. The Adult Spine, 3d Edition

COL KATHLEEN A. McHALE, MD
Svoboda, SJ; McHale, KA; Belkoff, SM; Cohen, KS; Belkoff, SM; and Klemme,W: The effects of tibial malrotation on the biomechanics of the tibio-talar joint. Foot and Ankle International. Feb. 2002.

Dhawan, A, Svoboda SJ, McHale KA. Tibial malrotation after injury triggers changes in kinetic chain. Biomechanics, July 2002.

Taylor, KF and McHale, KA: Percutaneous pin fixation of a pediatric neck fracture complicated by deep infection. Am J Orthop. In press 2002.

Machen, MS et al (McHale, KA senior author): "Low Intensity Ultrasound for Maturation of Regenerate Bone after Limb Lengthening: A Pilot Study". Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering. Accepted for publication.

Tis, JE, Meffert, R, Chao, EYS, and McHale, KA: The effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound on post distraction callus in a rabbit model. Journal of Orthopaedic Research. Accepted for publication.

COL DAVID POLLY, MD
Klemme, WR, Cunningham, BW and Polly, Jr., DW Microradiographic and histopathologic findings in a human cage explant following two-level corpectomy: A case report. Spine 2002;27:E15-E17.

Cunningham BW, Polly DW. The Use of Interbody Cage Devices for Spinal Deformity: A Biomechanical Perspective. Clin Orthop 2002;394:73-83.

Lehman RA, Kuklo TR, Belmont PJ, Andersen RC, Polly DW. Advantage of Pedicle Screw Directed into the Apex of the Sacral Promontory versus Bicortical Fixation: A Biomechanical Analysis. Spine 2002;27:806-811.

Klemme WR, Belmont PJ, Robinson M, Polly DW. In vivo accuracy of transpedicular thoracic screws in patients with and without coronal plane spinal deformities. Spine (in press).

MAJ STEVEN J. SVOBODA, MD
Svoboda KA, McHale KA, Belkoff SM, Cohen KS, Klemme BK. "The Effects of Tibial Malrotation on the Biomechanics of the Tibiotalar Joint." Foot and Ankle International 2002 Feb; 23(2):102-6.

Dhawan, A, Svoboda SJ, McHale KA. Tibial malrotation after injury triggers changes in kinetic chain. Biomechanics, July 2002.

MAJ JOHN E. TIS, MD
Tis J., Meffert, R., Inoue N., McCarthy E., Machen S., McHale K., Chao E.Y.S.:The Effect of Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Applied to Rabbit Tibiae During the Consolidation Phase of Distraction Osteogenesis. J. Orthop. Res., accepted for publication, MS#B01-086.

Tis J., Klemme W., Murphy K., Kirk K., Cunningham B.: A Biomechanical Comparison Of Braided And Unbraided Hamstring Tendons For Reconstruction Of The Anterior Cruciate Ligament. Am. J. Sports Med., accepted for publication, MS#5825.
 

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and cardiology . . .

Fishbain JT, Lee JC, Nguyen HH, Mikita JA, Mikita CP, Uyehara CFT, Hospenthal DR. Nosocomial Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Blinded Study to Establish Baseline Acquisition Rates. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. June 2003, 24(6):415-421.

Hartman AB, Essiet II, Isenbarger DW, Lindler LE. Epidemiology of Tetracycline Resistance Determinants in Shigella spp. and Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli: Characterization and Dissemination of tet(A)-1. J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Mar;41(3):1023-32.

Bodhidatta L, Vithayasai N, Eimpokalarp B, Pitarangsi C, Serichantalergs O, Isenbarger DW. Bacterial enteric pathogens in children with acute dysentery in Thailand: increasing importance of quinolone-resistant Campylobacter. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2002 Dec;33(4):752-7.

Sanders JW, Isenbarger DW, Walz SE, Pang LW, Scott DA, Tamminga C, Oyofo BA, Hewitson WC, Sanchez JL, Pitarangsi C, Echeverria P, Tribble DR. An observational clinic-based study of diarrheal illness in deployed United States military personnel in Thailand: presentation and outcome of campylobacter infection. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2002 Nov;67(5):533-8.

Lee TC, O'Malley PG, Feuerstein IM, Taylor AJ. The prevalence and severity of coronary artery calcification on electron beam computed tomography in black and white subjects. J Am Coll Cardiol, 2003;41:39-44.

Abbott KC, Reynolds JC, Taylor AJ, Agodoa LY. Hospitalized atrial fibrillation after renal transplantation in the United States. Am J Transplantation 2003;3:1-6.

Abbott KC, Trespalacios FC, Taylor AJ, Agodoa LY. Atrial fibrillation in chronic dialysis patients in the United States: risk factors for hospitalization and mortality. BMC Nephrology 2003;4:1.

Kent SM, Flaherty PJ, Coyle LC, Markwood TT, Taylor AJ. The effect of atorvastatin and pravastatin on serum C-reactive protein. Am Heart J, 2003 Feb;145(2):e8.

O'Malley PG, Feuerstein IM, Taylor AJ. Impact of electron beam tomography, with or without case management, on motivation, behavioral change, and cardiovascular risk profile: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2003;289:2215-2223.

Trespalacios FC, Taylor AJ, Agodoa LY, Bakris GL, Abbott KC. Heart failure as a cause for hospitalization in chronic dialysis patients. Am J Kidney Dis 41:1267-1277.
Hunt ME, O'Malley PG, Feuerstein I, Taylor AJ. The metabolic "score" predicts subclinical atherosclerosis independent of fasting serum LDL: Evidence supporting inclusion of the metabolic syndrome as a component within the NCEP ATP III Guidelines. Coron Artery Dis, 2003;14:317-322.

Taylor AJ, Carrow J, Bell D, Bindeman J, Watkins T, Lehmann T, Bhattarai S, Wong H, O'Malley PG. Validation of the MEDFICTS dietary questionnaire: A clinical tool to assess adherence to American Heart Association dietary fat intake guidelines. Nutrition Journal, 2003; 2:4.

Taylor AJ, Udelson JE, Bairey Merz CN. Executive Summary- Can atherosclerosis imaging techniques improve the detection of patients at risk for ischemic heart disease? J Am Coll Cardiol, 2003;41:1860-1862. [Conference Co-chairs Taylor AJ, Udelson JE, Bairey Merz CN.

Shry EA, Eckart RE, Winslow JB, Rollefson WA, Simpson DE. Effect of Monitoring of Physician Performance on Door-To-Balloon Time for Primary Angioplasty in Acute Myocardial Infarction. Am J Cardiol. 2003:91;867-869.

Shry EA, Eckart RE, Simpson DE, Stajduhar KC. Percutaneous coronary intervention in the elderly: procedural success and 1-year outcomes. Am J Geriatr Cardiol. 2003 Nov-Dec;12(6):366-8.

Dixon, WC, Peter RH, Sketch MH. "Catheter Aspiration of Thrombus During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention". J Invas Cardiol 2002;14(8):474-476.

Welka S. Invasive Hemodynamics in the Catheterization Laboratory: Self Assessment and Review. Editors: Eisenhauer, M. and Kern, M. Remedica Publishing 32-38 Osnaburgh Str., London, NW1 3ND, UK, March 2002.

Taylor AJ, Watkins T, Bell D, Carrow J, Bindeman J, Feuerstein IM, Wong H, Bhattarai S, O'Malley PG. Physical activity promotes a healthy cardiovascular risk factor profile but is unrelated to the presence or extent of subclinical atherosclerosis. Med Sci Sports Exer, 2002;34:228-33.

Taylor AJ, O'Malley PG, Detrano RC. Comparison of coronary artery computed tomography versus fluoroscopy for the assessment of coronary artery disease prognosis. Am J Cardiol. 2001;88(6):675-7.

Taylor AJ, Virmani R. Coronary anomalies: Which are high risk? ACC Current Journal Review, 2001;Sept/Oct:92-5.

Hypolite IO, Bucci J, Yuan CM, Williams M, Hshieh P, Cruess D, Agodoa LYC, Taylor AJ, Abbott KC. Acute coronary syndromes after renal transplantation in patients with end stage renal disease resulting from diabetes. Am J Transplantation, 2002;2:274-281.

Grace K, Jones DL, Hyatt R, Gibbs H, Swiecki J, Spain J, Maneval K, Taylor AJ. Development and implementation of a formulary statin interchange program: Process characteristics and lessons learned. Am J Health-Syst Pharm, 2002;59:1077-82.

Abbott KC, Hypolite IO, Hshieh P, Cruess D, Taylor AJ, Agodoa LYC. Hospitalized for congestive heart failure after renal transplantation in the United States. Ann Epidem, 2002;12:115-22.

Trespalacios FC, Taylor AJ, Agodoa LY, Abbott KC. Incident acute coronary syndromes in chronic dialysis patients in the United States. Kidney International, 2002;1799-1805.

Caravalho J, Van Petten M, O'Donnell SD, Feuerstein IM, O'Malley PG, Gillespie DL, Goff JM, Van Petten MA, Taylor AJ. Preoperative risk stratification using electron beam computed tomography in elective vascular surgery: Relationship to clinical risk prediction and postoperative complications. Ann Vasc Surg. 2002 Sep;16(5):639-43.

Abbott KC, Bucci JR, Cruess D, Taylor AJ, Agodoa LYC. Graft Loss and Acute Coronary Syndromes after Renal Transplantation in the United States. J Am Soc Nephrol 13:2560-2569.

Taylor AJ, Kent SM, Flaherty PJ, Markwood TT, Coyle LC, Vernalis MN. ARBITER: ARterial Biology for the Investigation of the Treatment Effects of Reducing cholesterol. A randomized trial comparing the effects of atorvastatin and pravastatin on carotid intima media thickness. Circulation, 2002;106:2055-2060.

Taylor AJ. Atherosclerosis imaging to detect and monitor cardiovascular risk. Am J Cardiol, 2002;90(suppl):8L-11L.
 
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WenfeiX

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J123 said:
DARPA, very cool stuff going on there. What is the project?
My professors designed this thing that we call "The Glove," which keeps your core body temperature down while you exercise in the heat. You put your hand in this vacuum chamber, and it cools down the blood in your palms, which circulates back around your body. I've used it myself and I've been able to exercise 70-100% longer at the same workload. At first we gave it to the Stanford athletes to use, but DARPA got interested along the way and gave us $$$$$. Depending on funding, we'll probably be field testing it at "boot camps" this summer...should be exciting stuff.

Here's an article about it in one of our school newsletters:
http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2004/september29/cool-929.html
 

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Homunculus said:
and nephrology. . . (and that's all i'm going to look for for now, lol)

http://www.wramc.amedd.army.mil/departments/Medicine/Nephrology/education/abstracts/index.html

maybe you just aren't readign the right journals :D

--your friendly neighborhood needs to go to bed caveman
Like I said, you're not listing any of the journals I read, but I will admit the volume is more impressive than I would have thought....just not the journals I read.....and nothing you listed have popped up in Journal Watch.
 

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militarymd said:
Ok, Nice list.....None of the journals are ones that I listed on my reading list. Where is the NEJM one that you mentioned?

Are any of the authors even military physicians? I looked up the articles on Pubmed.....Most of them list NIH as the originating institution...One from NMRI...not many AD physicians stationed there. One from WRAMC....one of 2 or 3 ? transplant centers in the military?
These were collaborations with NIH, basically their money, Navy people. All the physician/scientist were Navy as were the techs (me). Not many AD physicians stationed there? Are you kidding? I've only worked at NMRI now NMRC since 96...I think I've got a good idea of how many physicians are stationed here. :rolleyes:

These may not be the journals you listed but they are respected & peer-reviewed publications...there are hundreds of journals and if you only know the 3-4 you've listed then I guess you're right.
 

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WenfeiX said:
My professors designed this thing that we call "The Glove," which keeps your core body temperature down while you exercise in the heat. You put your hand in this vacuum chamber, and it cools down the blood in your palms, which circulates back around your body. I've used it myself and I've been able to exercise 70-100% longer at the same workload. At first we gave it to the Stanford athletes to use, but DARPA got interested along the way and gave us $$$$$. Depending on funding, we'll probably be field testing it at "boot camps" this summer...should be exciting stuff.

Here's an article about it in one of our school newsletters:
http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2004/september29/cool-929.html
Thanks for the reference, I can see why DARPA's interested. Very cool.