Sep 15, 2015
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Podiatry Student
I'm currently a first year student at Temple, and I feel like I really don't belong here anymore. We've had our first round of quizzes and exams, with several more coming up this week. In just about every single assessment (save for two quizzes where I've gotten 90's and another which was in the 70's), I've scored in the low to mid 80's. From what I know, Temple has an "interesting" grading scheme (e.g. a 92 = 3.0). So with my 8x% average being what it is...I'm probably between a 2.5-2.9 right now in terms of GPA.

I feel like when I study, I can’t remember anything. I can read something 100 times, make flashcards for it, and still sound like an idiot if I try to verbally explain it to anyone. I write down my notes, I highlight them, I make flow charts, I use my computer and type notes sometimes, I highlight the objectives in the power points. I always finish studying by 8 or 9pm every night. This is only the first semester of my first year and I feel like I am going to crash and burn once second year comes around and the workload just only gets worse. And, if by some miracle I make it to third year, I’m going to end up hurting someone because of my incompetence. But by then I’ll be too far in debt to get out. And with how podiatry residencies are, with the vast majority of them not taking anyone with a < 3.0, I feel like I'm SOL.

I know that preclinical grades are pretty much the end-all-be-all for a good majority of residencies in this field, and no amount of venting is going to change that. I've already accepted that. That said, should I just tough it out or should I just leave while I'm still ahead, debt-wise?
 
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OP
P
Sep 15, 2015
3
0
Status
Podiatry Student
I'm worried that I won't, and I'll just keep falling behind. As much as I want to be in this field, I don't know if the chance of not getting a residency because I have straight 80's in pre-clinical grades alone makes it worth it...
 
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Sep 15, 2015
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Resident [Any Field]
I created this account solely to respond to you. When I started at Temple, I struggled to understand how to study appropriately, and I had feelings of self-doubt similar to what you are experiencing now. I consistently scored in the 80's, and sometimes lower. I was able to improve my GPA every semester, and ended up doing better than most. I found the best way to study was simply repetition. You should read through your notes over and over again. At first you may struggle to read actively, but eventually you will develop that skill and become more and more efficient.

I would consider acquiring BRS anatomy as a resource to study gross anatomy. When I studied for boards I found it remarkably useful, and wished I had been aware of the resource when I took gross. It is only September, plenty of the course remains. When you take pathology next year, I strongly recommend purchasing Pathoma. Using Pathoma gave me a step-above my classmates, and the results were obvious.

Again, I urge you to eliminate mindless study habits, such as typing out our notes or flashcards. Spend time reading the lectures (actively) over and over again, and use class capture to augment your studying when you become weary from reading over and over again. It takes time to develop these skills, just focus on getting better rather than getting A's. Had I understood this earlier, I would have been far less stressed and had a much more enjoyable time first year. I still had a good time. Also, become friends with smart people. It will hurt your ego at first when they consistently do better, but you will catch up.

Lastly, I strongly agree with AttackNME - spend some time at Hop Sing Laundromat. The Captain Kirk is exceptional, but the Irish Nail is divine. It is no longer on the menu, but they will still make it for you. You may even see me there. If you do, you will know.
 

AttackNME

Podiatrist
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
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I'm worried that I won't, and I'll just keep falling behind. As much as I want to be in this field, I don't know if the chance of not getting a residency because I have straight 80's in pre-clinical grades alone makes it worth it...
There were people in the top 10% of my class who did not get a residency program. I also know great people in the bottom 10% that have matched and are doing well. It's not just grades, its the whole package.
 
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wakaflocka88

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Apr 9, 2013
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I completely agree with AttackNME and FeeltheBern -- solid advice and recommendations. I am going to re-emphasize befriending smart classmates, the hit on your ego will make you work harder than before. It works. Instead of spending so much time doing so many different techniques, try to study a lecture, and then explain it to yourself in front of a mirror. I always find myself looking out my window and verbalizing the concepts. Like the above said, relax and don't put so much pressure on yourself.
 
Jun 12, 2012
327
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Pre-Medical
I am TUSPM 2017 and in my class a mid 80s GPA would put you around 35-45 place out of 100 in the class. There are people that made comebacks, it is a shift studying for this vs undergrad or being in the workforce. I always like trying practice questions . My guess Dr. Litvin or Dr. Griffin and perhaps Dr. Washburn might be the better to ask about this. Feel free to PM me too. Grades are not the end all be all. Yes they are important and some in our class take it a bit casual, but a first place awkward person or someone who does not like touching patients (yes there are students in that mindset) is definitly not going to get the red carpet rolled out for them just due to their grades.
 
D

dyk343

You are not alone. I think I got mostly all C's on my first round of exams. I isolated my problem, fixed it, and turned everything around.

I did quite well in school thereafter.
 
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Jun 12, 2012
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92 is def not 3.0. I believe an 85 is or something close to that.
Sadly Temple has this bizzare method of % to the 4.0 scale. No one really knows the exact calculation. It works out as programs know the Temple way. a 92 would probably be a 3.2
 

bobtheweazel

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Jun 24, 2015
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.
 
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heybrother

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Oct 17, 2011
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DMU uses a very complicated and top secret formula to calculate what an (A-) will be. First they multiple the grade cut-off for an (A-) of 92.5% by 4.0. This gives them a 3.7. Then they go and get the top secret formula that Dr. Yoho keeps in a lockbox in his office. It takes into account our board pass rate, residency placement, the average price of a bushel of corn, the weight of the prize pig at the Iowa State Fair, the number of butter statues at the Fair (students are very nervous in August because so many of our grade metrics are Fair based) and the average number of Lapidus surgeries that were done across the country relative to the number of Austins. As a 4th year student I really feel motivated do as well as I can and eat a lot of corn so that the students below me can continue to enjoy such a generous (A-) system.

In other news - come on people. Figuring out how your grades are calculated isn't that hard :)
 

acromium

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Jan 2, 2013
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Haha I wish we were joking, but there actually is a weird formula to calculate your GPA at Temple. For those who don't know, the GPA calculation at Temple is (2+((% - 70) * 0.06666666666)). It might as well be based on the prized pigs at the state fair, that would make more sense. A weighted percentile grade of [92.55 - 96.3] would translate to [3.51 - 3.75]. In order to get a 4.0 you have to get a 100 in a class, so disregard whatever the pre-pod bobtheweazel said because after a 92 is not an automatic 4.0 unfortunately.
 

bobtheweazel

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Haha I wish we were joking, but there actually is a weird formula to calculate your GPA at Temple. For those who don't know, the GPA calculation at Temple is (2+((% - 70) * 0.06666666666)). It might as well be based on the prized pigs at the state fair, that would make more sense. A weighted percentile grade of [92.55 - 96.3] would translate to [3.51 - 3.75]. In order to get a 4.0 you have to get a 100 in a class, so disregard whatever the pre-pod bobtheweazel said because after a 92 is not an automatic 4.0 unfortunately.
Well, I'm just saying what I remember from my interviews, which may not be correct I suppose. When we asked the 2 students that spoke with us on our interview day at Temple they were also very unsure about the grading scale and couldn't really provide any useful information even though they somehow made it through multiple years of classes graded on that scale. When I was at Midwestern last week, they said anything above a 92 is an A and that's it.
 

Gigantron

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Sep 4, 2009
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Haha I wish we were joking, but there actually is a weird formula to calculate your GPA at Temple. For those who don't know, the GPA calculation at Temple is (2+((% - 70) * 0.06666666666)). It might as well be based on the prized pigs at the state fair, that would make more sense. A weighted percentile grade of [92.55 - 96.3] would translate to [3.51 - 3.75]. In order to get a 4.0 you have to get a 100 in a class, so disregard whatever the pre-pod bobtheweazel said because after a 92 is not an automatic 4.0 unfortunately.
Is this formula only used for individual class GPAs or your overall GPA?
 
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acromium

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Jan 2, 2013
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There are no letter grades, just a percentage in your class. Each class grade is then weighted by the number of credits it is worth and then they give you a total grade percentage. Then you use the formula to calculate your overall GPA, because that is all that matters.
 
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bobtheweazel

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This is very interesting. This GPA formula seems to slightly buff low grades and slightly nerf high grades, if y'all know what I mean. I'm not sure how to feel about this...
 

pacpod

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DMU uses a very complicated and top secret formula to calculate what an (A-) will be. First they multiple the grade cut-off for an (A-) of 92.5% by 4.0. This gives them a 3.7. Then they go and get the top secret formula that Dr. Yoho keeps in a lockbox in his office. It takes into account our board pass rate, residency placement, the average price of a bushel of corn, the weight of the prize pig at the Iowa State Fair, the number of butter statues at the Fair (students are very nervous in August because so many of our grade metrics are Fair based) and the average number of Lapidus surgeries that were done across the country relative to the number of Austins. As a 4th year student I really feel motivated do as well as I can and eat a lot of corn so that the students below me can continue to enjoy such a generous (A-) system.

In other news - come on people. Figuring out how your grades are calculated isn't that hard :)

This is amazing. I literally laughed out loud.

-A DMU alumnus
 
Jan 12, 2016
1
0
I am a second year at another school. First, your preclinical grades are not what determine what specialty you go into, Your STEP 1 score is, this test levels the playing field for everyone ( including international graduates). There are too many schools with too many different grading scales that it makes it impossible for residency programs to gauge how one student did compared to another from a different school during the first 2 years. Your clinical grades and recommendation will be more important than that, but STEP 1 is most important to open doors for specialties. Second, My school does pathology second year, and I found it more interesting and easier to study ( although it did take a while to figure out how to best study) - There are a ton of practice Q-banks you can use to help you learn and drill in what's important for 2nd year and boards. I thought I was going to fail 1st year , but I am so glad I just kept pushing, second year is alot of work, but its more interesting and the studying techniques are diffrent for me. Just keep working and aim to have a balanced life ( gym, hanging out) and you'll be fine. When you get to study for your boards alot of things will come together and you will gain more confidence .
 

FootAndAnkle

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Jul 6, 2013
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I am a second year at another school. First, your preclinical grades are not what determine what specialty you go into, Your STEP 1 score is, this test levels the playing field for everyone ( including international graduates). There are too many schools with too many different grading scales that it makes it impossible for residency programs to gauge how one student did compared to another from a different school during the first 2 years. Your clinical grades and recommendation will be more important than that, but STEP 1 is most important to open doors for specialties. Second, My school does pathology second year, and I found it more interesting and easier to study ( although it did take a while to figure out how to best study) - There are a ton of practice Q-banks you can use to help you learn and drill in what's important for 2nd year and boards. I thought I was going to fail 1st year , but I am so glad I just kept pushing, second year is alot of work, but its more interesting and the studying techniques are diffrent for me. Just keep working and aim to have a balanced life ( gym, hanging out) and you'll be fine. When you get to study for your boards alot of things will come together and you will gain more confidence .
Just FYI this is the podiatry forum (Our Step I is pass/fail, though grades do vary between schools, and nobody's going into any other specialties)