SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

'For the first time ever, more women than men are enrolling in medical school'

Discussion in 'Topics in Healthcare' started by W19, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. Suprachiasmatik

    Suprachiasmatik

    68
    40
    Jun 30, 2017
    I think we're mostly in agreement on this point. Once again, I maintain that employers do not care about you and your life. And since women are typically tasked with more family-related duties, their interests are at greater odds with those of an employer. Single mothers and fathers have it the worst.

    The real question is should a business be required to grant special privileges to a certain employee due to that employee's personal life choices? At the end of the day, having children is a choice, and capitalism is a cold, unforgiving system.
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. cj_cregg

    cj_cregg 2+ Year Member

    1,030
    1,633
    Jul 25, 2014
    I'm not contending the point that employers don't care about you and your life. I'm just saying that right or wrong, this approach disproportionately hurts working women because we live in a society where women are expected to take on the majority of child-raising responsibilities. The fact remains that it is a systemic issue that prevents women from being as successful in higher intensity careers, and not something that is necessarily the fault of women at the individual level.

    Regarding special treatment of people who have kids vs those who don't (assuming you don't mean special treatment of women because these policies should obviously benefit ALL parents, male or female)...if this was something that affected small group of workers, I might agree with you. However when something like 80-85% of people >40 y/o have kids, you'll have a hard time convincing me that being a little more flexible for employees with family responsibilities "special treatment" because the policy benefits the majority of employees. These policies could also benefit people who are caregivers for sick parents or other relatives, not just those with kids.
     
  4. sb247

    sb247 wait...you mean I got in? 5+ Year Member

    15,644
    20,581
    Jul 5, 2012
    Galt's Gulch
    Doubling salary would also benefit workers at first glance. But neither wage nor benefits should be pushed by the govt. if you are worth it in terms of what you bring as an employee, you can negotiate terms
     
  5. cj_cregg

    cj_cregg 2+ Year Member

    1,030
    1,633
    Jul 25, 2014
    Again: not saying it's right or wrong or financially sustainable or whatever. Just saying that the issue disproportionately affects women because of the role women are often expected to take in their families, and disagreeing with supra that something that impacts 4/5 workers over their lifetime would classify as special treatment.
     
  6. sb247

    sb247 wait...you mean I got in? 5+ Year Member

    15,644
    20,581
    Jul 5, 2012
    Galt's Gulch
    Women who are adults and make choices about where they work and how they divide childcare with the fathers
     
  7. cj_cregg

    cj_cregg 2+ Year Member

    1,030
    1,633
    Jul 25, 2014
    Sure, but unless you feel that men are inherently less likely to want to spend time with their children I find it hard to believe that socialization doesn't play a significant role in that. I don't think either of us are going to convince each other to change our minds on this issue.
     
  8. sb247

    sb247 wait...you mean I got in? 5+ Year Member

    15,644
    20,581
    Jul 5, 2012
    Galt's Gulch
    I’m not at all denying socialization...just saying that’s not the role for govt to be pushing employers around

    You want paid time off for kids? Be good enough that your employer thinks you are worth the demand
     
  9. Suprachiasmatik

    Suprachiasmatik

    68
    40
    Jun 30, 2017
    Things are going to get very interesting once AI/robotics/globalization/outsourcing gains even more traction over the next few decades. Attitudes like these may no longer be relevant.

    There will come a time when just being a great employee isn't good enough. Hell, I think we're already there in many industries. Medicine is unique, though, due to the fact that it is one of the biggest rackets in United States history and has high barriers to entry due to licensure etc.

    Employers only make concessions when there is a true scarcity of labor. When one is easily replaceable/automated/redundant, there will be no convincing an employer that you deserve more benefits/privileges.
     
  10. cj_cregg

    cj_cregg 2+ Year Member

    1,030
    1,633
    Jul 25, 2014
    For the third time, I was not making a value judgment about the fact that employers provide little flexibility for their employees to take care of family responsibilities. I was merely stating that it is true. And I never said anything even close to suggesting that government ought to regulate private businesses' policies on the matter. You're arguing against points I never made.
     
  11. sb247

    sb247 wait...you mean I got in? 5+ Year Member

    15,644
    20,581
    Jul 5, 2012
    Galt's Gulch
    Lots of employers provide good leave options, you just need to be of a skill level that makes that the norm
     
    VA Hopeful Dr likes this.
  12. cj_cregg

    cj_cregg 2+ Year Member

    1,030
    1,633
    Jul 25, 2014
    Still has literally nothing to do with the point I was making but okay dude :thumbup:
     

Share This Page