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For your interview do Adcoms like you to know what type of Dr. you want to be?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Green912, May 1, 2002.

  1. Green912

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    Do most people interview knowing (a least for now) what type of Dr they want to be? Do Adcoms "like" to hear that or do they blow it off knowing that you'll probably change your mind?
    With my backround and work experience I could easily play up my desire to be an EM Dr. without being very far off base. However there's sure to be plenty of things to come up that I haven't even thought of yet or experienced so I'm going to keep my mind wide open. What about those people who really have no idea?
     
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  3. souljah1

    souljah1 Attending

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    Green,

    I think they are more concerned about your intentions for entering medical school. Only about 1/3 (I think) of the students who enter medical school wind up practicing or specializing in the area that they initially set out to enter. On a couple of my interviews I mentioned areas that particularly fascinated me. One interviewer said, "Ack, you will be surprised at what you will be talented at, as well as what the specialties are really like". I think he was saying that I should enter medical school with an open mind, to give every specialty a chance, and to realize that a lot occurs in those 4 years.

    For interviews, it is definitely not a negative to have a good perception of what field you wish to enter. It will only tell your interviewers that you have thought about your decision to go to medical school. I think it would be better than saying, "um, I dont' know". You can say "I don't know", but then maybe say "It isn't that I haven't thought about it, for I have. I have realized that there is so much to medicine that fascinates me and I'm choosing to enter medical school with a tabula rasa (so to speak). However, currently I'm very much interested in blah blah blah"

    Hope that helps you. Good luck. I'm glad the application process is all over (for now). In four years we'll all be doing it again to match for residency.
     
  4. spacecadet

    spacecadet Senior Member

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    Green912,

    I think it's better to say that you are interested in a certain specialty. At my interviews this year, I got the impression that most of my interviewers were disappointed that I didn't already have one picked out. I want to keep an open mind and make that decision after I am exposed to the many different aspects of practicing medicine.

    Next year, I'm telling them that I want to be an OB/GYN. :)
     
  5. johnM

    johnM Senior Member

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    I think that many interviewers ask just because they hope to make interesting conversation, not because they really care what specialty you are interested in. knowing something about what you are interested in shows that you are familiar will the medical field and that you have some idea of what you are getting yourself in to, but they know that you are going to learn a great deal over the next few years about various fields, and my goal was to show that while I have certain interests, I am excited about learning more about other fields before I make any decisions.
     
  6. johnM

    johnM Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by spacecadet:
    <strong>Green912,

    I think it's better to say that you are interested in a certain specialty. At my interviews this year, I got the impression that most of my interviewers were disappointed that I didn't already have one picked out. I want to keep an open mind and make that decision after I am exposed to the many different aspects of practicing medicine.

    Next year, I'm telling them that I want to be an OB/GYN. :) </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">My sister (also applying to med school :) ) told interviewers that she is interested in ob/gyn (she really is) and didn't always get a great response from it. She got a lot of questions asking her how she plans on balancing a family life with such a hectic schedule, and about whether she has plans to marry and have kids.
     
  7. spacecadet

    spacecadet Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by johnM:
    My sister (also applying to med school :) ) told interviewers that she is interested in ob/gyn (she really is) and didn't always get a great response from it. She got a lot of questions asking her how she plans on balancing a family life with such a hectic schedule, and about whether she has plans to marry and have kids.[/QB]</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">That is so dang illegal. I can't believe interviewers get away with it. I've never heard of a man being asked those questions.

    Maybe I'll say pediatrics instead. :) That's what they expect you to say if you're a woman - OB/GYN or pediatrics. The medical field is getting better, but there's still a lot of sexism out there.
     
  8. Assassin

    Assassin Assassin

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    I'll pass on the advice I got prior to interviewing:

    Never say you want to go into specialty X, say you're LEANING TOWARDS specialty X but have not finalized your decesion/considering specialty Y/whatever. This shows both, that you have a particular interest in medicine, and that you're open-minded :)

    Now if you're really good...
    prior to your interview, you will often know what your interviewer's specialty is - feel free to play into that one, but make absolutely certain it's a game that you can play, cause well...it's all fun and games until someone get's hurt <img border="0" alt="[Laughy]" title="" src="graemlins/laughy.gif" />
     
  9. warpath

    warpath Officer Cadet

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    When they asked me that at my interviews, I always said, "Well I don't know for now, I'm keeping my options open. I've only had some exposure to [insert relevant specialties here]and I'm counting on my clinical rotations and electives to give me more exposure to other feilds of medicine and hence, help me make a better choice". My interviewers were impressed by this. At one school, the interveiwer actually exclaimed, "That's what I wanted to hear! Because how do you know if you haven't experienced it?"
     
  10. trouta

    trouta Senior Member

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    I was asked what I wanted to go into at nearly every one of my interviews. I told them that i was thinking about EM but had recently become interested in peds due to some recent experience. Dont know how this affected their perception of me, but they definately did ask.
     
  11. oldman

    oldman Senior Citizen
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    I always reversed this question on them. "how did you choose your specialty? Do you like it?"

    I am all about turning tables!!! muahahaha
     
  12. johnM

    johnM Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by spacecadet:
    <strong>That is so dang illegal. I can't believe interviewers get away with it. I've never heard of a man being asked those questions.

    Maybe I'll say pediatrics instead. :) That's what they expect you to say if you're a woman - OB/GYN or pediatrics. The medical field is getting better, but there's still a lot of sexism out there.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Yeah, I know, but it happens and no bitching about what the should and shouldn't be asked (or what is sexist) is going to fix it. you will just need to be polite in anwering it and move on. frankly, i think that it's a valid concern, for men and women, even if inappropriate to ask during the interview. you will need to show that you have thought about it though.

    as aside, i was also asked a few questions that didn't really seem appripriate, though I'm not sure what's 'legal,' ... at least two of my interviewers brought up money... how was I going to pay for school, etc. the point is, it happens, and you've got to deal with it tactfully.
     
  13. MandM06

    MandM06 Mr. 25/8

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    Here is a story I have regarding how specialization came up during an interview:

    I was interviewed by a panel of Dr's (two practicing physicians in the area and a 4th year). The two physicians asked me to guess their specialties at the end of the interview. One of the doctors was African-American and the other was Caucasion (sp?). I said the black doctor was orthopedics (he was pretty big) and the white doctor was in surgery. It turned out that both the black and white doctor were in family medicine. I was kind of sweating :confused: at the time because I didn't want to come off like I had prejudices on who could be in what field.

    I do agree with the above posts that you should just indicate that you will use your experiences during med school to decide on a specialization. But it doesn't hurt to say which field you're leaning towards.
     

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