Forbes Contributor Gets Blasted for Comparing "Osteopaths Versus Doctors."

IamaBanana

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Jun 25, 2010
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There is an extensive conversation on this article over in the medical students' forum. It's actually pretty interesting, as are the comments on the article's page. He withdrew/apologized for some of the things he said after getting called out by the president of the AOA and wrote a second article. It's probably linked to in one of his own reply comments at the bottom there.
 

mri5005

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Jul 22, 2010
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You would have thought that this sentiment was fading by now. come on, this is ridiculous. But it's a reality that we need to think about and consider. It's sad. I want to pick a medical school based on how comfortable I am there but I keep seeing ignorance in the public toward the D.O. degree.

Example: My preceptor for my tech training: "So you'll go there (WVSOM) if you don't get into medical school"

Me: "Uh, actually WVSOM IS a medical school"

Preceptor : "Oh, yeah I guess"

Do I let these encounters sway me? At some point, it's not all about how I view the initials behind my name, it's how my patients will view them. How and when will this change in the future?
 
Oct 15, 2010
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You would have thought that this sentiment was fading by now. come on, this is ridiculous. But it's a reality that we need to think about and consider. It's sad. I want to pick a medical school based on how comfortable I am there but I keep seeing ignorance in the public toward the D.O. degree.

Example: My preceptor for my tech training: "So you'll go there (WVSOM) if you don't get into medical school"

Me: "Uh, actually WVSOM IS a medical school"

Preceptor : "Oh, yeah I guess"

Do I let these encounters sway me? At some point, it's not all about how I view the initials behind my name, it's how my patients will view them. How and when will this change in the future?
Your future patients will view you in accordance to how well you treat them, etc. The overwhelming majority of people will never even think to question your educational background. Even if they do, all you have to do is briefly explain the reason(s) you decided to go the DO route, and I'm sure they'd come around - a patient in the dispassionate healthcare system of America may even prefer the holistic and hands-on philosophy of the osteopath.
 

JaggerPlate

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May 28, 2007
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You would have thought that this sentiment was fading by now. come on, this is ridiculous. But it's a reality that we need to think about and consider. It's sad. I want to pick a medical school based on how comfortable I am there but I keep seeing ignorance in the public toward the D.O. degree.

Example: My preceptor for my tech training: "So you'll go there (WVSOM) if you don't get into medical school"

Me: "Uh, actually WVSOM IS a medical school"

Preceptor : "Oh, yeah I guess"

Do I let these encounters sway me? At some point, it's not all about how I view the initials behind my name, it's how my patients will view them. How and when will this change in the future?
Altogether, it's not something to worry about and, from what I've heard from residents, attendings, etc, the questions/misconceptions, etc, are much less frequent than pre-meds assume.
 
Jul 16, 2009
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Your future patients will view you in accordance to how well you treat them, etc. The overwhelming majority of people will never even think to question your educational background. Even if they do, all you have to do is briefly explain the reason(s) you decided to go the DO route, and I'm sure they'd come around - a patient in the dispassionate healthcare system of America may even prefer the holistic and hands-on philosophy of the osteopath.
I wish this were true, but sadly I just don't think this is the case. In a perfect world this would all be true, but it's pointless and incorrect to assume that people do not have any biases. People have preconceived notions and these are not always changed by a simple explanation.

I have the same concerns as the previous poster. I love the idea of being a DO and cannot wait to attain this goal, but it DOES bother me that these misconceptions still exist. They are not enough to dissuade me from becoming a DO, but I am concerned and bothered by the misconceptions that still persist.
 
Oct 17, 2010
428
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I wish this were true, but sadly I just don't think this is the case. In a perfect world this would all be true, but it's pointless and incorrect to assume that people do not have any biases. People have preconceived notions and these are not always changed by a simple explanation.

I have the same concerns as the previous poster. I love the idea of being a DO and cannot wait to attain this goal, but it DOES bother me that these misconceptions still exist. They are not enough to dissuade me from becoming a DO, but I am concerned and bothered by the misconceptions that still persist.
Honestly, if you want to be an amazing doctor, you will be, regardless of the letters at the end of your name.... Director of Duke's Pediatric Neurology Program... a DO. My orthopedic surgeon that work with NY pro sports teams, a DO. As was mentioned either above or in the article, NASA's head of space medicine is a DO. Honestly you can do what you want, and most likely you've gone to see doctors you had no idea were DO's but they were... Your reputation is that matters to your patients in the end.
 

JaggerPlate

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I wish this were true, but sadly I just don't think this is the case. In a perfect world this would all be true, but it's pointless and incorrect to assume that people do not have any biases. People have preconceived notions and these are not always changed by a simple explanation.

I have the same concerns as the previous poster. I love the idea of being a DO and cannot wait to attain this goal, but it DOES bother me that these misconceptions still exist. They are not enough to dissuade me from becoming a DO, but I am concerned and bothered by the misconceptions that still persist.
Here's another issue too ... you're assuming that any sort of bias that exists in the pre-medical world or in the misinformed minds of people peripherally related to health care (ie: a tech trainer) translates to patient bias. It does not. 99% of patients fall into one of several categories:

1. truthfully have 0 - very little understanding of what becoming a physician entails, they don't know what a residency is, what being an intern means, how one specializes, etc, and these are the same people who won't know what a DO is/means, or that it's any different from a MD. If you think these people will show 'bias,' you're wrong, because in order to show bias, you need to actually know that something is different.

2. The type of people who will realize/understand what a DO is, maybe ask a question or two, and then be 100% happy/fine with it because they like and trust you as a doctor. This bond is going to be far more important than a specific degree.

I honestly think the % of patients who would have a problem seeing a DO are the same type that have all kinds of ignorant pre-conceived notions - won't see doctors of a certain sex, won't see doctors of a certain race, etc. The good news is that (in most fields) 90% of your patients will come from referrals or people googling (X doctor in Y area) and won't care at all what your degree is as long as you do a good job. Additionally, keep in mind that there are PLENTY of patients to go around.
 

ILikeDrugs

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Three sentences in and I stopped reading at "an D.O. degree". :rolleyes: This guy should an hero himself. :)
 

IamaBanana

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Jun 25, 2010
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Three sentences in and I stopped reading at "an D.O. degree". :rolleyes: This guy should an hero himself. :)
Technically, he should just an hero. It is already self-referential so you don't need the "himself." Otherwise, +1! :)
 
Jun 29, 2010
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there's always going to be people who have nothing better to do than to step down on others. no matter how high of a level you obtain, people will always tell you there's higher. my friends at northwestern med. school look down on those amongst them who are going into primary care ... my neurosurgeon cousin tells me that the neurologists look down on the neurosurgeons because they're "not as smart" ... it really never ends. and it's always amongst the elitist stick-up-their-***** type of people. just gotta learn to roll w/ it and take in the punches b/c that's life.
 

Postal

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there's always going to be people who have nothing better to do than to step down on others. No matter how high of a level you obtain, people will always tell you there's higher. My friends at northwestern med. School look down on those amongst them who are going into primary care ... My neurosurgeon cousin tells me that the neurologists look down on the neurosurgeons because they're "not as smart" ... It really never ends. And it's always amongst the elitist stick-up-their-***** type of people. Just gotta learn to roll w/ it and take in the punches b/c that's life.
+1
 

USCTrojan11

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there's always going to be people who have nothing better to do than to step down on others. no matter how high of a level you obtain, people will always tell you there's higher. my friends at northwestern med. school look down on those amongst them who are going into primary care ... my neurosurgeon cousin tells me that the neurologists look down on the neurosurgeons because they're "not as smart" ... it really never ends. and it's always amongst the elitist stick-up-their-***** type of people. just gotta learn to roll w/ it and take in the punches b/c that's life.
Should this be the other way around? Shouldn't neurosurgeons be looking down on neurologists, not the other way?
 

mri5005

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Jul 22, 2010
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Should this be the other way around? Shouldn't neurosurgeons be looking down on neurologists, not the other way?
I would argue that neither should be looking down on the other. The health care team should be working together, not establishing a hierarchy.
 

ScottMontgomery

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Feb 23, 2010
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Should this be the other way around? Shouldn't neurosurgeons be looking down on neurologists, not the other way?
No, actually he has it correct, usually the Surgeons would be looked down upon as "not being as smart" because technically the old saying goes: "Internists Diagnose and Surgeons treat" Technically saying that I.M. Drs, or in this case a Neurologist Diagnoses the problem and the surgeon need only fix the problem, they dont have the knowledge to diagnose the problem correctly, only to treat the problem after someone else diagnoses it.

Do I believe this BS? No way, I believe the vast majority of Surgeons know their patients problem, whats causing it and what it takes to fix it. When it comes to specialty stuff, say an IM doc with ID sub specialty diagnosing a rare case that might require surgery, then sure, the IM doc knows more, but that is what they are trained for. Does a IM doctor know how to perform surgery, I am sure they could complete very basic surgeries or invasive treatments. Could they perform a Hemi Hip Arthroplasty, or a Craniotomoy? I am going to say no.

Both parties are skilled at what they do, they both have knowledge, but they both have knowledge in their desired specialty, which means they lack in another.

Just my opinion.


As to the Forbes article, there is nothing to really say to this, his writing and the comments speak for themselves... He is an idiot, plain and simple.

3rd sentence in the starting paragraph, "An Osteopath has an D.O. degree..." What a genius.
 
Aug 20, 2009
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there's always going to be people who have nothing better to do than to step down on others. no matter how high of a level you obtain, people will always tell you there's higher. my friends at northwestern med. school look down on those amongst them who are going into primary care ... my neurosurgeon cousin tells me that the neurologists look down on the neurosurgeons because they're "not as smart" ... it really never ends. and it's always amongst the elitist stick-up-their-***** type of people. just gotta learn to roll w/ it and take in the punches b/c that's life.
well, intelligence is not a continuum, it's more like a circle. :p

I could argue that dogs are smarter than humans because they smell s**t a mile away while we don't know until we step right into it... (metaphor pending....)
 

BestDoctorEver

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The guy who wrote that stupid bull is a douchebag. I think we are giving that narcissistic guy a platform by reading his bs. Therefore, this thread must be shut down.