Fork in the road... Deciding between D.O. and M.D.

meatie

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Context:

1. I have interviews at EVMS (Norfolk, VA) and VCU (Richmond, VA).
2. I've recently heard some good news and had a great interview at an awesome D.O. program.
3. My interview for EVMS is coming up soon and I need to either book my flight ASAP or cancel.

Problem:

1. I can't decide whether or not I will be happy being a D.O. on the west coast near my family or if I would like to have the added opportunities and "smoother" education and shot at residency as an M.D. far away from my family and in locations I am not excited about.

Personal background:

1. Asian-american, grew up in a metropolitan area on the west coast.
2. Like to think of myself as "low maintenance". De-stressing for me includes the gym, playing music, food, and some drinks with friends. I do like having big city amenities and the chance at a variety of things to do, however.
3. Would like to remain on the west coast in the future
4. Going D.O. would be cheaper

Professionally:

1. While I am pretty flexible with my desired specialty (interested in EM/neurology), I can say with some certainty that I am not looking to go into surgical fields.
2. I would be happy to be a D.O., but I am worried about what kind of doors may close for me when applying for residency.
3. I am not looking forward to having to take both the COMLEX and USMLE. I would much rather just take one board exam.
4. I am worried that if I become interested in a more competitive specialty during school, I may have shot myself in the foot by going D.O.
5. While I love patient-based care and clinical medicine, I know that I am also personally interested in the academic, administrative (thinking of a MPH dual degree), and policy side of things.

Additional Concerns:

1. I've heard that Richmond and Norfolk aren't exactly great for Asian-Americans, but am I making it to be a bigger issue then it actually is?
2. How important really is location during medical education? Won't I be in class/with my classmates 85% of the time?
3. Given my circumstances, would going M.D. be worth the added tuition/living costs and possibly unhappiness for the added professional flexibility?

4. EVMS and VCU are fantastic schools and I would feel awful passing up an opportunity to visit either.


Thank you guys for any input and best of luck to all during this cycle!
 

VanEman

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Very personal decision. But I would suggest this: look at UCSD's pre-med web site. It is the best that I have seen. All the other UC's pre-med web sites are pitiful in comparison. You will find a document that shows what MD and DO schools UCSD graduates have been choosing. Not surprising, UCSD's own med school is the one that gets the highest number of their own university's grads. But what school is next? Western Osteopathic. I think what the list shows is that many Californians, given the choice between a DO school on the West Coast or an MD farther afield, choose to stay where the ocean is on the left. So if you choose DO on the West Coast, you will have lots of excellent company!
 
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Hrdrock

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I've had similar concerns this application cycle. In the end, I decided not to send in my secondaries to many east coast schools because, in the end, I want to remain on the west coast. I've been accepted to a DO program here on the west coast and think I would rather attend there than go to the east coast just to be an MD.

I've had concerns with "shooting myself in the foot" as far as residency opportunities go. But, if you want to end up on the west coast as an attending, I would think that you would have more opportunities to do so by attending a medical school in the region.

I'm also having the same concern with being close to family. I'm hoping that some current students could lay some concerns to rest about how much time we would even have to interact with family/friends.

In the end, it's my understanding (and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong) that how well one does and/or where one ends up in residency is largely dependent on the student, not so much the school. I would think that if you're going to be a stellar student and make a lasting impression on attendings where you rotate in 3rd/4th year, you're going to do that regardless of where you attend school.

I've been looking to have all these same conversations with someone so I'm glad this thread is here!
 
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Dr. Retractor

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As the previous poster said, it's a very personal decision that only you can make. That said here's my $0.02.

1. I don't know. Someone more experienced can answer that.
2. Yes, but having a good support network (read: family) is very important as well.
3. How sure are you that you won't want to do a competitive residency? FWIW I know an academic plastic surgeon who is very accomplished and is a DO. So you're not necessarily giving up competitive specialties by going DO.
4. You should go on the interview and see if you really like the school, and then make final, more informed decision.

How positive are you that you will be accepted at the MD schools? You may not even have to make this decision.

But in case you do, here's what I'd do:
1. Flip a coin. Heads = DO, Tails = MD
2a. It lands on Tails and you say "okay best 2 out of 3" Go DO.
2b. It lands on Heads and you say "okay best 2 out of 3", go MD.
3a. It lands on Tails and you say "well it looks like I'm going to be an MD", go MD.
3b. It lands on Heads and you say "well it looks like I'm going to be a DO", go DO.
 
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meatie

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Dr. Retractor, you definitely got a laugh out of me hahah! Something about a coin flip and deciding my next four years is just hilariously absurd. Love it. I felt that the interview at my top choice that I am still awaiting went pretty well, but then again, people are notoriously bad at gauging their own performance. Never mind the futility of trying to figure out what an adcom member thought of you.

Thanks VanEman and Hrdrock. I also agree that the vibe I have gotten from interviews is that residency placement matters first and foremost on your own performance in rotations and boards and then, to a certain degree, the connections and legacy that your school has created with programs across the nation. I think that this is where it becomes a real crapshoot in terms of finding the "right" school. How can you even really know what the "right" school is? What I've been beginning to realize is that given the fact that student interests in specialties change so frequently during medical school, it would be almost impossible for a school to be able to have the "right" connections to residency programs for your still-undecided future career 4 years down the line. What we are really looking at then when we decide upon which school to go to are a number of factors that are, like you guys have mentioned, entirely subjective:

1. Is the school's location "good enough" for your needs?
2. Does the school's rep and history boost your chances at attaining great residencies in a variety of specialties across the nation or are their connections/alumni base/working relationships more limited due to a variety of factors including perhaps a relatively young institutional age, geographic proximity, or still-developing professional repute? Are these institutional limitations okay with your desired specialty? Will the lack or existence of certain resources from the help or hinder you in attaining that position?
3. Is the curriculum set up for future board success and clinical savviness?

That being said, I will probably end up canceling my M.D. interviews to stay on the west coast. California is that important to me ;) and I'm not exactly gunning for ortho/plastics/derm.
 

The_Bird

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With very few exceptions you should go to an established US Allopathic School over an Osteopathic one.
You're not backing up that statement?
 
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Baller MD

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You're not backing up that statement?
Why should he? Md > Do for residency applications. Yeah some Do match competitive residencies but all things being equal md is better and you see more MDs in competitive programs and specialties. If you think otherwise then you're in denial.
 
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pink/\floyd

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I find these types of threads so annoying. Why did you apply to EVMS and VCU if you didn't wanna be that far from home in the first place? Now that you have 2 MD II, you are reconsidering (people would die to get an II from any MD program). If you wanna be close to your family stay in California and go the DO route. If you want less problems when applying to residency programs-go the MD route. We don't know what would make you happier i.e, your family or your career.
 

Instatewaiter

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You're not backing up that statement?
It's a pretty tried and true one. I agree with it whole heartedly.

As much as pre-meds would love to act like they know what's up, where you go to school is important. Those DOs that have gone throug the match, rarely come back to SDN talking with such confidence as pre-meds do. It is a eye-opening experience. Many residency programs outright say they will not even interview a DO. In 20 years will this improve- yearh. Will it resolve by the time you finish med school- probably not. Quite frankly, unless there are compelling reasons (like needing to be in a given location for family) it doesn't make a lot of professional sense.
 
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The_Bird

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It's a pretty tried and true one. I agree with it whole heartedly.

As much as pre-meds would love to act like they know what's up, where you go to school is important. Those DOs that have gone throug the match, rarely come back to SDN talking with such confidence as pre-meds do. It is a eye-opening experience. Many residency programs outright say they will not even interview a DO. In 20 years will this improve- yearh. Will it resolve by the time you finish med school- probably not. Quite frankly, unless there are compelling reasons (like needing to be in a given location for family) it doesn't make a lot of professional sense.
Why should he? Md > Do for residency applications. Yeah some Do match competitive residencies but all things being equal md is better and you see more MDs in competitive programs and specialties. If you think otherwise then you're in denial.
Backing up with what? Double blind randomized control trials comparing the two?
Chill. All I was asking was for someone to backup what they posted when all they wrote was a blanket statement.
 
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The_Bird

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Nobody here is not chill.
It's a turn of phrase. Just don't make statements without supporting them. Also, people shouldn't instantly assume I totally disagree with them when I didn't even say so. Try to communicate properly.

Yes, MD matches "better" than DO both historically and right now. We don't know how that will change in the future and I'd wager the past isn't w good predictor seeing as there had never beem a merger like this in the past. It will most likely have an effect on the numbers we see for both degrees in terms of residency matching into the next decade, a decade into which most of us will graduating.

Let's see what @Goro has to say.
 
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Baron Samedi

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Just don't make statements without supporting them. Also, people shouldn't instantly assume I totally disagree with them when I didn't even say so. Try to communicate properly.
Well shucks, thanks for the advice.
 

Baller MD

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It's a turn of phrase. Just don't make statements without supporting them. Also, people shouldn't instantly assume I totally disagree with them when I didn't even say so. Try to communicate properly.

Yes, MD matches "better" than DO both historically and right now. We don't know how that will change in the future and I'd wager the past isn't w good predictor seeing as there had never beem a merger like this in the past. It will most likely have an effect on the numbers we see for both degrees in terms of residency matching into the next decade, a decade into which most of us will graduating.

Let's see what @Goro has to say.
Why the quotes around better? It's true.

Here's your evidence: http://www.nrmp.org/match-data/main-residency-match-data/
 
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edgerock24

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Threads like these are super annoying. They do nothing to help the general public because they are so personalized based on the OP's individual situation.

Also, it would be very unintelligent to simply not go to an interview at a good school. It is even more unintelligent to make a MD vs DO thread before you have even been accepted to an MD school.
 
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Baller MD

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Because "better" is subjective. Thanks for the link!


No problem. Take it to heart now, yeah?
It can't be subjective if there's data backing it up. Objective: MD > DO in terms of residency placement.
 

The_Bird

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It can't be subjective if there's data backing it up. Objective: MD > DO in terms of residency placement.
But individual criteria for something to be "better" can be subjective. I agree that MD > DO for competitive residency placement at this time.
 
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Baron Samedi

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But individual criteria for something to be "better" can be subjective. I agree that MD > DO for competitive residency placement at this time.
So then what are you arguing against, exactly?
 

The_Bird

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So then what are you arguing against, exactly?
? I'm not really making an argument. Aside from that the concept of something being "better" based upon a single criterion isn't representative of everyone's idea of "better". Sure, MD matches better than DO, on average but it seems weird to say MD is all around better than DO just based on that fact, which may change drastically at any point in the future.
 

Goro

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I concur. But I have some caveats, based upon the experiences of my own grads.

My students self-select for Primary Care, and end up in good ACGME residencies.
They also do well with the AOA match.
Those that end up in ACGME sites have told me that they had to work harder to get there.
Some residency directors still have a mentality of "dogs, Irish and DOs need not apply".
Extremely competitive residencies are extremely competitive even for MD grads.
The upcoming merger should make things easier for DO grads....every DO I know who has ties to the upper echelons of the AOA believes this as well.


It's a turn of phrase. Just don't make statements without supporting them. Also, people shouldn't instantly assume I totally disagree with them when I didn't even say so. Try to communicate properly.

Yes, MD matches "better" than DO both historically and right now. We don't know how that will change in the future and I'd wager the past isn't w good predictor seeing as there had never beem a merger like this in the past. It will most likely have an effect on the numbers we see for both degrees in terms of residency matching into the next decade, a decade into which most of us will graduating.

Let's see what @Goro has to say.
 
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meatie

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The criticism is noted. When I was originally applying to schools I was anxious and nervous that I would not get into a single school. I applied very broadly and now I'm paying the price (literally) for having cast such a wide net out of fear.

I think that considering my future career interests in academics and maybe administration going the M.D. route may allow me to be more flexible career-wise. Sort of an inverse "safety", if that makes sense.

I agree that it's an intensely personal decision to make, however, I appreciate everyone throwing out their opinions/insight.
 
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el_duderino

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You've got the apps in and the IIs. Pursue them all 100% until you have an acceptance.

You'll feel pretty stupid if you turn down some DO interviews and end up without an acceptance.
 
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meatie

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You've got the apps in and the IIs. Pursue them all 100% until you have an acceptance.

You'll feel pretty stupid if you turn down some DO interviews and end up without an acceptance.
I already have some D.O. acceptances.
 

el_duderino

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So you're trying to decide whether to turn down your DO acceptances in the hopes of getting an MD acceptance?
 
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I concur. But I have some caveats, based upon the experiences of my own grads.

My students self-select for Primary Care, and end up in good ACGME residencies.
They also do well with the AOA match.
Those that end up in ACGME sites have told me that they had to work harder to get there.
Some residency directors still have a mentality of "dogs, Irish and DOs need not apply".
Extremely competitive residencies are extremely competitive even for MD grads.
The upcoming merger should make things easier for DO grads....every DO I know who has ties to the upper echelons of the AOA believes this as well.
Completely hypothetical question involving the Irish bit. Is it likely any residency would frown upon being a naturalized citizen rather than one born in the States?
 

el_duderino

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I did. He never mentioned the word accept until I asked. What am I missing? He's trying to decide whether to go DO vs MD when he's apparently sitting on a DO acceptance but no MD acceptance, right?
 

pink/\floyd

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I did. He never mentioned the word accept until I asked. What am I missing? He's trying to decide whether to go DO vs MD when he's apparently sitting on a DO acceptance but no MD acceptance, right?
OP said he heard some "good news" at the DO school, so I interpreted that as an acceptance. Anyhow, he liked the school and is happy that it is close to home, but doesn't know if he should attend MD interviews far from home (EVMS, VCU).
 
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pink/\floyd

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Last post from me. OP go and attend both your interviews and then make your decision. Don't close any doors, you have an amazing opportunity in front of you.
 
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meatie

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What pink/\floyd said is correct. I'm trying to weigh how "important" it is to have that M.D. title in terms of future residency opportunities and career flexibility considering my interest, albeit cursory, in academics. I want to know this so that I can consider if I need to just buck up and live in a less than ideal locale to pursue a more professionally sound career path or be okay with living closer to home through the D.O. route.

Sorry if that was not at all clear in my posts. I apologize.

Thank you for your encouragement @pink/\floyd and everyone else.
 
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el_duderino

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I guess I'm reading the situation a little differently. I think you absolutely should go to the interviews.
 

AMEHigh

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I'm not going to get in to the MD vs DO debate, but I will comment on the location thing.

For me, location was and is (as I apply for residency) very important. Yes you will be busy with school, but for me personally I knew I'd be pretty miserable in a rural location with the down time that I did have, so I didn't apply to schools or programs in those areas. I also highly value diversity, so I pick those locations over others as well.

I enjoy making the most of my time outside of school because yes school is hard, but you're not studying 24/7 all 4 years of school, so location is very important to me when deciding where I want to spend 4+ years.
 

VanEman

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It can't be subjective if there's data backing it up. Objective: MD > DO in terms of residency placement.
Did you read the part where he said he wasn't interested in the wildly competitive residencies. Nobody has a hard time getting a
I concur. But I have some caveats, based upon the experiences of my own grads.

My students self-select for Primary Care, and end up in good ACGME residencies.
They also do well with the AOA match.
Those that end up in ACGME sites have told me that they had to work harder to get there.
Some residency directors still have a mentality of "dogs, Irish and DOs need not apply".
Extremely competitive residencies are extremely competitive even for MD grads.
The upcoming merger should make things easier for DO grads....every DO I know who has ties to the upper echelons of the AOA believes this as well.
Dogs, Irish and DO's need not apply? How crude. I suppose these residency directors were more than a little annoyed when this year's Nobel Prize winner for Physiology/Medicine was John O'Keefe, the son of immigrants from...Ireland. But then, people like that don't let facts interfere with their bigotry.
 

Goro

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Absolutely not.

Completely hypothetical question involving the Irish bit. Is it likely any residency would frown upon being a naturalized citizen rather than one born in the States?

Vannie, just to make sure, my comment was a historical reference. In the 1800s,during the great waves of Irish emigration to the US, there was a huge backlash of xenophobic sentiment against the Irish. Supposedly stores had want ad signs that read "no Irish need apply" and saloons supposedly had signs that read "no dogs or Irish allowed".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Irish_sentiment

Hence, this is my reaction to comments once posted in these forums that some RDs [at Mt Sinai, I believe] specifically state "No DOs".

Dogs, Irish and DO's need not apply? How crude. I suppose these residency directors were more than a little annoyed when this year's Nobel Prize winner for Physiology/Medicine was John O'Keefe, the son of immigrants from...Ireland. But then, people like that don't let facts interfere with their bigotry.
 
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Doctor Bob

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Dogs, Irish and DO's need not apply? How crude. I suppose these residency directors were more than a little annoyed when this year's Nobel Prize winner for Physiology/Medicine was John O'Keefe, the son of immigrants from...Ireland. But then, people like that don't let facts interfere with their bigotry.
Historical swing and a miss...
 

Anicetus

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Context:

1. I have interviews at EVMS (Norfolk, VA) and VCU (Richmond, VA).
2. I've recently heard some good news and had a great interview at an awesome D.O. program.
3. My interview for EVMS is coming up soon and I need to either book my flight ASAP or cancel.

Problem:

1. I can't decide whether or not I will be happy being a D.O. on the west coast near my family or if I would like to have the added opportunities and "smoother" education and shot at residency as an M.D. far away from my family and in locations I am not excited about.

Personal background:

1. Asian-american, grew up in a metropolitan area on the west coast.
2. Like to think of myself as "low maintenance". De-stressing for me includes the gym, playing music, food, and some drinks with friends. I do like having big city amenities and the chance at a variety of things to do, however.
3. Would like to remain on the west coast in the future
4. Going D.O. would be cheaper

Professionally:

1. While I am pretty flexible with my desired specialty (interested in EM/neurology), I can say with some certainty that I am not looking to go into surgical fields.
2. I would be happy to be a D.O., but I am worried about what kind of doors may close for me when applying for residency.
3. I am not looking forward to having to take both the COMLEX and USMLE. I would much rather just take one board exam.
4. I am worried that if I become interested in a more competitive specialty during school, I may have shot myself in the foot by going D.O.
5. While I love patient-based care and clinical medicine, I know that I am also personally interested in the academic, administrative (thinking of a MPH dual degree), and policy side of things.

Additional Concerns:

1. I've heard that Richmond and Norfolk aren't exactly great for Asian-Americans, but am I making it to be a bigger issue then it actually is?
2. How important really is location during medical education? Won't I be in class/with my classmates 85% of the time?
3. Given my circumstances, would going M.D. be worth the added tuition/living costs and possibly unhappiness for the added professional flexibility?

4. EVMS and VCU are fantastic schools and I would feel awful passing up an opportunity to visit either.


Thank you guys for any input and best of luck to all during this cycle!
I had to make a similar decision as you.

I chose MD and I don't regret that decision at ALL. I wasn't too excited to learn OMM, personally. As of two months into school, I am working my *** off and I have to say I would probably strangle a baby if someone added OMM labs and exam questions on top of this load, or god forbid, replaced some of the material I am learning with OMM.

Yes, it isnt California (also my hometown and where a DO school was located that I was accepted to), I get it, but I would make the same decision a million times over again with absolutely no regrets.

As for residency, there's quite a bit of a crunch coming, and I just have to say it's just better safe than sorry. Not that DO would throw you into the dumps of the earth for residency, but my philosophy is every little bit helps and if the crunch really does effect DO's more than MD's you don't want to be hitting yourself over the head for having the choice before.
 
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Doctor Bob

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In general, everyone should apply to both MD and DO.
And, if you get into an MD school you probably should take it... not because it's inherently better, but because although they're equal medically, there's still a questionable social stigma.
But you shouldn't turn down a DO acceptance and risk being a reapplicant the next year in the hopes of being an MD.
 

HelpPleaseMD

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Context:

1. I have interviews at EVMS (Norfolk, VA) and VCU (Richmond, VA).
2. I've recently heard some good news and had a great interview at an awesome D.O. program.
3. My interview for EVMS is coming up soon and I need to either book my flight ASAP or cancel.

Problem:

1. I can't decide whether or not I will be happy being a D.O. on the west coast near my family or if I would like to have the added opportunities and "smoother" education and shot at residency as an M.D. far away from my family and in locations I am not excited about.

Personal background:

1. Asian-american, grew up in a metropolitan area on the west coast.
2. Like to think of myself as "low maintenance". De-stressing for me includes the gym, playing music, food, and some drinks with friends. I do like having big city amenities and the chance at a variety of things to do, however.
3. Would like to remain on the west coast in the future
4. Going D.O. would be cheaper

Professionally:

1. While I am pretty flexible with my desired specialty (interested in EM/neurology), I can say with some certainty that I am not looking to go into surgical fields.
2. I would be happy to be a D.O., but I am worried about what kind of doors may close for me when applying for residency.
3. I am not looking forward to having to take both the COMLEX and USMLE. I would much rather just take one board exam.
4. I am worried that if I become interested in a more competitive specialty during school, I may have shot myself in the foot by going D.O.
5. While I love patient-based care and clinical medicine, I know that I am also personally interested in the academic, administrative (thinking of a MPH dual degree), and policy side of things.

Additional Concerns:

1. I've heard that Richmond and Norfolk aren't exactly great for Asian-Americans, but am I making it to be a bigger issue then it actually is?
2. How important really is location during medical education? Won't I be in class/with my classmates 85% of the time?
3. Given my circumstances, would going M.D. be worth the added tuition/living costs and possibly unhappiness for the added professional flexibility?

4. EVMS and VCU are fantastic schools and I would feel awful passing up an opportunity to visit either.


Thank you guys for any input and best of luck to all during this cycle!
very easy decision. MD all the way. Both EVMS and VCU are great. Honestly you will not know what fields you are interested in unless you have had prior exposure and are you kidding me? you won't have any problems beings being asian in Richmond or Norfolk or any where in the US for that matter as long as you follow common sense. I.e. Don't go into the ghettos at 3am when there are no one around.

you will regret turning down the MD interview if you have done so already. It may make perfect sense to you premeds that it doesn't matter as long as you are interested in a less competitive speciality and do well in the program, but the reality is that your decision at the moment will affect the program you will match in way more than the countless additional hrs you will put in at the DO school to do well.

its up to you if decide to listen but you have been warend
 
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meatie

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Apr 4, 2014
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Thanks guys for all your input. It's definitely helped me make a decision :)
 

VanEman

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Absolutely not.

Completely hypothetical question involving the Irish bit. Is it likely any residency would frown upon being a naturalized citizen rather than one born in the States?

Vannie, just to make sure, my comment was a historical reference. In the 1800s,during the great waves of Irish emigration to the US, there was a huge backlash of xenophobic sentiment against the Irish. Supposedly stores had want ad signs that read "no Irish need apply" and saloons supposedly had signs that read "no dogs or Irish allowed".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Irish_sentiment

Hence, this is my reaction to comments once posted in these forums that some RDs [at Mt Sinai, I believe] specifically state "No DOs".

Dogs, Irish and DO's need not apply? How crude. I suppose these residency directors were more than a little annoyed when this year's Nobel Prize winner for Physiology/Medicine was John O'Keefe, the son of immigrants from...Ireland. But then, people like that don't let facts interfere with their bigotry.
Goroie, just to make sure you know, anyone who has a 4th grade education in the United States knows about "no Irish need apply" and the xenophobia underlying it. You just provided some nice reminders that doctors can be just as bigoted and prejudiced about anyone who is a "them" instead of an "us," whether those "thems" are immigrants, DO's or whatever.
 

DoctorSynthesis

Friendly osteopath
Jun 8, 2013
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Absolutely not.

Completely hypothetical question involving the Irish bit. Is it likely any residency would frown upon being a naturalized citizen rather than one born in the States?

Vannie, just to make sure, my comment was a historical reference. In the 1800s,during the great waves of Irish emigration to the US, there was a huge backlash of xenophobic sentiment against the Irish. Supposedly stores had want ad signs that read "no Irish need apply" and saloons supposedly had signs that read "no dogs or Irish allowed".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Irish_sentiment

Hence, this is my reaction to comments once posted in these forums that some RDs [at Mt Sinai, I believe] specifically state "No DOs".

Dogs, Irish and DO's need not apply? How crude. I suppose these residency directors were more than a little annoyed when this year's Nobel Prize winner for Physiology/Medicine was John O'Keefe, the son of immigrants from...Ireland. But then, people like that don't let facts interfere with their bigotry.
NYU IM I believe.

Why the quotes around better? It's true.

Here's your evidence: http://www.nrmp.org/match-data/main-residency-match-data/
Here are recent numbers


Table 4-3. U.S. MD vs. DO Residency Match Percentages by
Specialty (2011)
Specialty DO Graduates U.S. MD
Graduates
Family Medicine 19.51% 7.39%
Pediatrics 8.14% 10.04%
General Internal
Medicine
18.66% 16.7%
Emergency
Medicine
11.61% 7.25%
Obstetrics and
Gynecology
5.52% 5.07%
Psychiatry 4.03% 3.65%
Diagnostic
Radiology
2.53% 5.04%
Anesthesiology 4.26% 6.26%
Orthopedic Surgery 2.53% 3.53%
Dermatology 0.71% 1.76%
Neurological
Surgery
0.32% 0.99%

So that's the current difference in matching. Doesn't include factors like pre selection for primary care/less competitive applicants / and upcoming changes (merger) but there you have it.

Make what you want of it.

OP I feel like you have a good idea of what each option entails. You have to make a decision for yourself what's important. You aren't crazy for choosing DO or MD. Go to the school that fits YOUR needs.


Also side note:
This thread really proves that some people choose DO over MD and have some pretty good reasons for it!
 
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Jul 15, 2014
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Well if OPs plans are primary care it's sort of moot point.

I see now that OP says "EM/Neurology". Emergency medicine you should be fine with either. Neuro might be a bit harder, but still okay. If you were thinking about things like plastics/derm/Neurosurg/ortho etc. I would seriously not even bother with DO. You could have a chance at a residency with a DO, but it would be hard.
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
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Based upon posts here and elsewhere, it's physically impossible to underestimate the intelligence of the American public.

Goroie, just to make sure you know, anyone who has a 4th grade education in the United States knows about "no Irish need apply" and the xenophobia underlying it. You just provided some nice reminders that doctors can be just as bigoted and prejudiced about anyone who is a "them" instead of an "us," whether those "thems" are immigrants, DO's or whatever.