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FP and lifestyle?

Discussion in 'Family Medicine' started by StudentX, Mar 18, 2004.

  1. So far I'm leaning toward primary care, and I hear it's very time consuming, but I want to have time for family and a personal life too. Is there a way to do this? I hear that as an FP you don't treat the critically ill, so you tend to get less call than internists or obgyns. And say if I work at a community clinic as opposed to an HMO setting, maybe I'd be less hammered? I'm loving my community clinic experiences btw and totally see myself as a community doc, prolly in an urban setting. Even pay off my debts through a loan repayment program. So, I have less debt, and I have a little more time after my humble FP practice to see the kids at home.

    Too good to be true you say...but why? Thanks
     
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  3. stomper627

    stomper627 Go Cougs!!!
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    If time with family and a personal life is something youre after, do an internet search on "boutique medicine". Could be something for you if the govt stays out of it. Although slated as a practice towards the "wealthy" I dont see any reason that it has to be. It could be profitable to run a boutique for those less fortunate. Might not be as profitable, though.
    stomper
     
  4. KyGrlDr2B

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    Moving to FP forum.
     
  5. Kosmo

    Kosmo Senior Member
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    Your practice will be what you make of it. Even as an internist you can practice with minimal call and restrict yourself to a certain patient population. I imagine your school has resources, a list of people whom you could talk to for insight on this stuff.

    PS: Don't think that working at a comminity clinic will hammer you any less than working for an HMO! ;)
     
  6. eatapita

    eatapita Senior Member
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    My sister is an FP, so she's told me all the pro's and con's of it. Unfortunately, she has more con's than pro's (course this could just be that she picked the wrong field for herself) I'll just list a few.

    The Pro's are:
    1) FP jobs are more plentiful than say, pathology jobs.
    2) You can get a regular 8-5pm job- so yes, there is time for family
    3) If you don't know what's wrong with the patient, you can always say, " Well, that's not my area of expertise. Let me refer you to someone else."


    The Con's are:
    1) you spend a lot of time educating and convincing stupid health insurance reps why your patient needs certain amts of drug X or procedure X (so your patient can get the drugs or procedures they need paid for).
    2) you spend a lot of time educating and convincing pharmacists too.
    3) Patients never listen to you anyways, so you're bound to see them again and again.
    4) You're not very mobile, since you have to build your practice.
    5) You're the first person patients see and remember the most, so you more likely be sued then say a radiologist.
     
  7. Whisker Barrel Cortex

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    Good points except for that last one. Actually, radiologists are much more likley to be sued than FPs. One reason is that every patient that comes to the hospital has a radiologic study of some sort and the radiologist is named in the suit regardless of error. Also, the patient does not have a relationship with a radiologist and thus is more willing to sue them. Thirdly, unlike in clinical medicine, there is always proof of a missed diagnosis in the form of images. As an FP, you can easily say that that large lymph node that ended up being lymphoma was not there when you saw the patient 1 month ago. But on CT, it is there and if we miss it, the evidence is right there.
     
  8. maxbaner

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    don't want to start new thread, bump.
     
  9. iatrosB

    iatrosB trying not to kill anyone
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    What exactly is your question? Be more specific than "bump" and we'll help you.
     
  10. maxbaner

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    Many threads talk about decline of med students going into primary care especially family medicine. But isn't it one of the best specialties for a good lifestyle and provides time for outside hobbies? Making around 150k is very comfortable even though they should be paid more for what they do, but I've found that most jobs are 9-5. So can anyone in FM talk more about their lifestyle, what they think about the field and it might be in the future? Is the knowledge of a bit of everything overwhelming?
     
  11. Blue Dog

    Blue Dog Fides et ratio.
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    Let's look at family medicine objectively:

    1) Relatively short residency
    2) Relatively low malpractice incidence and insurance costs
    3) Virtually limitless job opportunities
    4) Broad scope of practice that you can tailor to what you enjoy doing
    5) Wide variety of pathology (undifferentiated patients)
    6) Regular hours (no nights and weekends unless you want to do them)
    7) As much vacation as you can afford to take
    8) Easy to work part-time, if that's what you want to do
    9) Ability to perform cosmetic procedures, if you want to
    10) Readily transferrable skills to other fields (urgent care, public health, hospitalist, etc.)

    I could go on. IMO, FM is the ultimate "lifestyle specialty."
     
  12. maxbaner

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    Thanks for that input! I was also wondering, people who decide against medicine say that they don't want to take their work home with them, but it doesn't seem that is something that occurs in family medicine. But I'm probably wrong, anyone have input on this?
     
  13. AwesomO

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    There are situations where you can "leave it all at work" such as being a hospitalist or being in urgent care. If you do the traditional practice there will be times when you have to take charts home to finish. Although it's certainly not to the level of some fields where you are constantly getting calls from or having to go into the hospital.
     
  14. iatrosB

    iatrosB trying not to kill anyone
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    I really do think FM is highly UNDER rated as a lifestyle specialty. If we made more money, I assure you people would flock to it.

    Personally, I'm OK with the 160K I'll receive (at the low end) in exchange for the lifestyle and work that I enjoy.

    As Kent says over and over...FM offers the most flexibility of any specialty out there.
     
  15. triniboy

    triniboy PGY1
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    I guess this has been mentioned before... but here i go anyway...

    does FM get the respect and recognition that other 'specialists' get?
    or for that matter is it really a speciality on its own... or a just a jacvk of all trades?

    dont get me wrong... I begin FM in 1 months time...

    but i do think about these things from time to time....
     
  16. andwhat

    andwhat Senior Member
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    I will go with this one, in University settings, supposedly FM residents dont get the respect that they deserve...

    but hey, you get the money, lifestyle, and flexibility, as Kent pointed out -- to do tons of procedures, hospitalist, Urgent Care, ER shifts.

    I think that FM is very nice in several perspectives.
    Compensation that it deserves for the amount of work served? I think that needs to improve.

    However, if you look at an Opthalmologist, who sees 20 to 25 patients per day, and does maybe 4 to 6 surgeries per day, this individual nets around 200-225 K.

    Hospitalist, you can definitely makes this much and even more if you want to, PLUS you do not have to take call, and do not have your own patients long term.

    Urgent Care, if you work your way up, you can make way more than this as well.

    Traditional FM, if you work with hospitalists admitting your patients overnight, call is very very light.

    That is very nice lifestyle wise.
     
  17. andwhat

    andwhat Senior Member
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    Yes endless paperwork, albeit this aspect exists in every specialty unfortunately. E charting and prescribing should be nice, albeit I for one hate the computerized system. It slows me down significantly.
    It is very thorough though.
    Ortho definitely you are constantly called to go to the hospital. ENT and Opthalmology not so bad at all in that respect.
    Derm you may as well just live in clinic, you rarely go to the hospital, or the ER.
     

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