sps27

5+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2012
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145
Was wondering if those who have traveled the road before would weigh in with their advise. And I write this with some trepidation off course.....

1) Have a bachelors and MS in Mech Engg background.
2) I've taken A&P 1 & 2, Microbio, Intro to A&P, Gen Bio 1, Orgo Chem 1.
3) I plan to take Gen Bio 2, Orgo Chem 2, Biochem and Genetics in 2014.
4) MS Mech Engg GPA is 3.3.
5) I've been working for the most of my career after MS in different corporations and it is mainly through them that I have volunteered in non profits. I also volunteered in a shock and trauma center in the city Med hospital for a few months earlier this year. I plan to continue volunteering next year after MCAT in Jan. I also plan to shadow a doctor in a clinic after MCAT.
6) I have no clinical experience or research lab experience. I've applied for part time research lab technician positions in the past few months but no luck so far.

Through some well meaning friends, I had a chance interview with an admissions counselor in the med school in my city. I told him my story. It is on his advise that I am taking these courses. I meet him regularly and update him on my status. He has mentioned that my engg background will help as they like to keep a diverse student body.

And now to the question. Will ADCOMS look at my file with mostly engg based courses, no lab experience, volunteer experience mostly in a non clinical setup and little so far in a clinical setup, no president of any club etc., and dish it aside totally. If I get a decent MCAT 30+, do I stand a chance? Thought I'd ask. I've read stats of students in this forum and by golly, mine is nothing close to what some folks have.......so hope I am not on a fools errand or something......
 
Jul 29, 2013
347
70
Status
Pre-Medical
Haha you have to take much of would you read on these forums with a grain of salt. I have seen many diverse people from my university get into med school and not all with stellar stats/resumes. I am from Louisiana and we are not famous for having the most strict med schools when it comes to admissions to take that into account but realize that adcoms look for diversity when it comes to students and that diversity is not obtained by admitting only bio majors with perfect grades, perfect mcats, countless hospital hours, and 50 different campus clubs. First of all engineers make great med students and adcoms are known for liking you guys. If I could go back and do it all over again, I would seriously consider majoring in engineering rather than bio. The lab experience most of us get in bio is petty and insignificant(at least in my experience). We do really basic stuff for the most part and much of it has nothing to do with medicine. Volunteer experience is important regardless of the setting. The purpose of volunteer work is to show that you are a people person and that you can function with others as a unit rather than strictly as a memory sponge that can spit memorized jargon back onto paper like many bio majors. I think you have a great chance. Im not sure how a 3.3 in grad mech eng stands in comparison to a masters in bio but I know mech engineering is far more difficult. If your undergrad grades are good, you do well on the mcat, and you continue volunteering you should be just fine if not quite competitive. May I ask what state you will be applying in, when you will take the mcat, and what your undergrad stats were?
 
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sps27

5+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2012
733
145
Haha you have to take much of would you read on these forums with a grain of salt. I have seen many diverse people from my university get into med school and not all with stellar stats/resumes. I am from Louisiana and we are not famous for having the most strict med schools when it comes to admissions to take that into account but realize that adcoms look for diversity when it comes to students and that diversity is not obtained by admitting only bio majors with perfect grades, perfect mcats, countless hospital hours, and 50 different campus clubs. First of all engineers make great med students and adcoms are known for liking you guys. If I could go back and do it all over again, I would seriously consider majoring in engineering rather than bio. The lab experience most of us get in bio is petty and insignificant(at least in my experience). We do really basic stuff for the most part and much of it has nothing to do with medicine. Volunteer experience is important regardless of the setting. The purpose of volunteer work is to show that you are a people person and that you can function with others as a unit rather than strictly as a memory sponge that can spit memorized jargon back onto paper like many bio majors. I think you have a great chance. Im not sure how a 3.3 in grad mech eng stands in comparison to a masters in bio but I know mech engineering is far more difficult. If your undergrad grades are good, you do well on the mcat, and you continue volunteering you should be just fine if not quite competitive. May I ask what state you will be applying in, when you will take the mcat, and what your undergrad stats were?
Thanks for the support. I appreciate it. I live and work in Tennessee and will apply to schools here in TN and also other places to see where I stand. My bachelors in Mech engg is from Mumbai, India. I evaluated my undergrad transcripts from WES (world educational services) and they gave a cGPA of 3.3. WES does not mean much to AMCAS I know. My advisor in med school admission committee asked me to do it just in case. Did MS in Mech from University of Oklahoma and that cGPA is also 3.3. Have a 4.0 in pre med courses taken so far and currently slated for Jan 2014 MCAT.
 
Jul 29, 2013
347
70
Status
Pre-Medical
Ok well those pre med courses are going to be the most important. That is great keep up the good work! Finish all the pre med courses in a similar manner and then get to the mcat. A 4.0 with your pre reqs and a good mcat should be all you need!
 
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sps27

5+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2012
733
145
Ok well those pre med courses are going to be the most important. That is great keep up the good work! Finish all the pre med courses in a similar manner and then get to the mcat. A 4.0 with your pre reqs and a good mcat should be all you need!
Thank you. I appreciate the feedback.
 
Jul 29, 2013
347
70
Status
Pre-Medical
No prob! You might actually have an easier time with the mcat having that engineering background. Will you be able to take it before 2015?
 

valkener

5+ Year Member
May 17, 2010
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Your background is interesting and there are quite a few of eng or cs students who transfer into medicine. If you can get a 30+ MCAT your chances are great, and if you want to go to a DO school guaranteed.
 
Jul 29, 2013
347
70
Status
Pre-Medical
I forgot to mention I have a buddy who majored in mechanical engineering and decided he wanted to be a doctor right after graduating. He graduated with a 3.5 I believe, had almost no ECs except or being part of an engineers society, and ended up with a 36 on his mcat despite thinking he bombed it after walking out. He applied and went to Baylor med first time around.
 
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sps27

5+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2012
733
145
I forgot to mention I have a buddy who majored in mechanical engineering and decided he wanted to be a doctor right after graduating. He graduated with a 3.5 I believe, had almost no ECs except or being part of an engineers society, and ended up with a 36 on his mcat despite thinking he bombed it after walking out. He applied and went to Baylor med first time around.
Wow.....that is good to know. I plan to take MCAT in Jan 2014, so its right down the alley so to speak. It's a lot of fun revisiting those physics and gen chemistry concepts. I actually find TBR bio the most interesting.....Thanks for all the feedback. This is more than I expected and has helped me to keep moving forward.
 
Jul 29, 2013
347
70
Status
Pre-Medical
It's also going to help you quite a bit to have all those pre reqs fresh in your memory. Just make sure not to take the exam before you feel ready. Have you started studying yet?
 
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sps27

5+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2012
733
145
It's also going to help you quite a bit to have all those pre reqs fresh in your memory. Just make sure not to take the exam before you feel ready. Have you started studying yet?
Started some time back, in Feb/March. Finished all of Kaplan by early June. Then picked up TBR and realized I was nowhere close to what is reqd. I postponed my exam registration of July 2'nd to Aug 28'th. When Aug came around I was still not done with TBR. I was simultaneously revising Kaplan along with TBR. So I cancelled registration all together. I wasn't ready. Now I am enrolled for Jan 2014. I should be done with TBR in a couple of weeks. It was certainly worth the time and effort. I start AAMC FL's, TPRH-SW, EK tests after that. I also work full time so I knew from get go this will be a long haul and frustratingly tedious. However, I will be on FMLA for crunch time Dec and Jan. So hopefully I'll be able to slog through the last 2 months and give it all I got.
 
Jul 29, 2013
347
70
Status
Pre-Medical
Wow ok. Those TBR texts are lengthy and detailed but everyone who uses them seems to have very positive feedback. Make sure to do tons of practice passages and full lengths before taking the real deal. Do you have any aamc full lengths left? I finished all my prep a few weeks before the mcat and did full length exams every other day at a time and place that was similar to what I would experience taking the real one. The familiarity and application experience made taking the real one so much less daunting.