Bengisu

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Hi to all,

I am an international student in Europe. I have a B.S in Molecular Biology and Genetics and PhD in Cellular Biochemistry. I would like to apply for M.D in United States. I am considering 3 yera MD programs. Once I heard that there is a special Md program in Miami, Florida where PhDs can get MD in 2 years. Are thre such programs around? With this CV I have, do I have to take MCAT exams?

I would appreciate any kind of suggestion and information.

Thank you very much.

Bengisu
 

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Bengisu said:
Hi to all,

I am an international student in Europe. I have a B.S in Molecular Biology and Genetics and PhD in Cellular Biochemistry. I would like to apply for M.D in United States. I am considering 3 yera MD programs. Once I heard that there is a special Md program in Miami, Florida where PhDs can get MD in 2 years. Are thre such programs around? With this CV I have, do I have to take MCAT exams?

I would appreciate any kind of suggestion and information.

Thank you very much.

Bengisu
While the PhD may give you some advantage over your classmates in ease of understanding the medical school course work, in general, it does not absolve you of the general requirements for admission to medical school nor does it automatically confer you advanced standing. Therefore, you should expect to have to take all the pre-med requirements (obviously you should have most of the Biological sciences taken care of; do you also have the required 1 year of General Chemistry, 1 year of Organic Chemistry, 1 year of Physics, 1 year of English and some advanced mathematics?) as well as the MCAT.

Most US medical schools require that the prerequisite courses be taken at a US undergraduate facility. For example, at the University of Miami, all coursework must be taken in a college or university located in North America and approved by a national accrediting agency and listed in the current Education Directory of the US Office of Education. Except for study-abroad courses taken while attending a qualified institution, credits earned at foreign institutions are not accepted.


I am unaware of any "3 year MD programs" in the US; they are either 6-8 years (for high school leavers) or 4 years in length (after a university degree).

I did find some information regarding a PhD to MD course in 2 years; however, the program appears to have been absolved nearly 20 years ago. The following is from the U of Miami website:

The PhD-to-MD Program was a special program started by the University of Miami School of Medicine in 1971. It was an innovative and extremely selective program in which students holding the PhD degree could earn the MD degree in just two years. The program was discontinued in 1987 at the request of the Liaison Committee for Medical Education. Since this organization accredits all medical schools in the United States and Canada, there are no other programs like the PhD-to-MD Program in North America.

There is a Clinical Scientist Training Program at Miami which offers a new two-year certificate program. The Clinical Scientist Training Program (CSTP) is designed for scientists and physicians engaged in biomedical research. This certificate program provides participants with skills necessary to design and conduct clinical or applied basic research. Funded by a Clinical Research Curriculum Award from the National Institutes of Health, the CSTP consists of formal coursework, a seminar series, and a mentored research project. It does NOT award the MD degree.

Even if they did have such a program your citizenship would undoubtedly be a problem as all applicants must be US citizens or unconditional permanent residents of the United States with an alien registration receipt (green) card in their possession at the time they complete the AMCAS application. Since the School of Medicine is subsidized for each Florida resident enrolled, Florida residents are given preference in all admissions decisions.

Do you desire to work in the US after graduation/residency? If so, then it would be worth seeking medical school admission here, although as noted above, most schools will require at least a year of US undergraduate study to qualify for admission. If you plan on going back to Europe to work, IMHO you are better off studying there.

Here are some links which might help:

For medical school information:
http://www.aamc.org

For residency information (ie, after training):
http://www.nrmp.org
http://ecfmg.org
http://www.ama-assn.org/freida

Hope this helps, despite being full of negative information.
 
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Bengisu

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Kimberli Cox said:
While the PhD may give you some advantage over your classmates in ease of understanding the medical school course work, in general, it does not absolve you of the general requirements for admission to medical school nor does it automatically confer you advanced standing. Therefore, you should expect to have to take all the pre-med requirements (obviously you should have most of the Biological sciences taken care of; do you also have the required 1 year of General Chemistry, 1 year of Organic Chemistry, 1 year of Physics, 1 year of English and some advanced mathematics?) as well as the MCAT.

Most US medical schools require that the prerequisite courses be taken at a US undergraduate facility. For example, at the University of Miami, all coursework must be taken in a college or university located in North America and approved by a national accrediting agency and listed in the current Education Directory of the US Office of Education. Except for study-abroad courses taken while attending a qualified institution, credits earned at foreign institutions are not accepted.


I am unaware of any "3 year MD programs" in the US; they are either 6-8 years (for high school leavers) or 4 years in length (after a university degree).

I did find some information regarding a PhD to MD course in 2 years; however, the program appears to have been absolved nearly 20 years ago. The following is from the U of Miami website:

The PhD-to-MD Program was a special program started by the University of Miami School of Medicine in 1971. It was an innovative and extremely selective program in which students holding the PhD degree could earn the MD degree in just two years. The program was discontinued in 1987 at the request of the Liaison Committee for Medical Education. Since this organization accredits all medical schools in the United States and Canada, there are no other programs like the PhD-to-MD Program in North America.

There is a Clinical Scientist Training Program at Miami which offers a new two-year certificate program. The Clinical Scientist Training Program (CSTP) is designed for scientists and physicians engaged in biomedical research. This certificate program provides participants with skills necessary to design and conduct clinical or applied basic research. Funded by a Clinical Research Curriculum Award from the National Institutes of Health, the CSTP consists of formal coursework, a seminar series, and a mentored research project. It does NOT award the MD degree.

Even if they did have such a program your citizenship would undoubtedly be a problem as all applicants must be US citizens or unconditional permanent residents of the United States with an alien registration receipt (green) card in their possession at the time they complete the AMCAS application. Since the School of Medicine is subsidized for each Florida resident enrolled, Florida residents are given preference in all admissions decisions.

Do you desire to work in the US after graduation/residency? If so, then it would be worth seeking medical school admission here, although as noted above, most schools will require at least a year of US undergraduate study to qualify for admission. If you plan on going back to Europe to work, IMHO you are better off studying there.

Here are some links which might help:

For medical school information:
http://www.aamc.org

For residency information (ie, after training):
http://www.nrmp.org
http://ecfmg.org
http://www.ama-assn.org/freida

Hope this helps, despite being full of negative information.


Thank you very much. Your reply was really helpful for me. I have taken all those advanced maths, organic chemistry, physics, etc. I want to stay in U.S after garduation. Since they require one year pre-med thing, I dont know maybe that will be too long then. After MD degree how does it work in US in order to be a specialized doctor like ophtalmologist etc.? is it also very long training? While studying to get an MD degree, will it be difficult to get a financial aid or scholarship? Thank you very much.

Bengisu
 
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Visa issues are likely to be a real problem when applying for residency. Some hospitals will not want the hassle of sponsoring a visa, and those that do will mainly want you to get a J-1, which REQUIRES you to go back to your country of origin for at least two years after completing your training. You can get a waiver, but only with great difficulty and if you work in a medically underserved area (i.e. a fairly undesirable place) for several years. Green cards, even though marriage, is NOT an option on a J-1.

Also, there's no Federal loans and very few other funding opportunities during med school as a non-citizen.

Training periods are generally comparable, sometimes a bit shorter, compared to Europe. Main difference is that you start training right after med school, rather than waiting several years, as is customary in several Eur. countries. HOWEVER, you cannot be guaranteed that your specialist status will be accepted if you decide to go back to Europe at some point, as there's absolutely no reciprocal recognition between the US and Europe on medical training.

Also, as previous poster noted, at lot of universities demand that some or all of undergrad experience is in a accredited US univ. and will NOT accept foreign courses.

So, as noted by K. Cox, you'd probably want to think long and hard before committing to such a long and winding road as getting a US degree as a foreigner...
 

jiayuanyuan

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Yeah, you are perfectly right about the MD to Ph.D program of UM. I was attracted to this program and moved to Florida for it three years ago. It doesn't exit any more and I found out that it's impossible for foreingers to get in the MD program of UM. All the MD students are from universities of North America. And they are required to be either citizens or green card holder.

I am kind of in the same boat: With a BS from China and Ph.D from US in Biological sciences, I am taking MCAT of this August. I just received my green card last month. I don't know the chance of my getting in any MD program. But I will have a try, or I will regret when I'm 40.

Dear Kimberli Cox,

Based on my information, do you think that I have any chance to get in other universities other than UM?

Thanks a lot
 

Scottish Chap

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I was in a similar situation to both of you (foreign B.S. and applying as an international with a Ph.D.). I was fortunate to gain admission this year. Do a search to check my previous posts for more info. Failing that, please feel free to PM me for advice on your situation.
 

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jiayuanyuan said:
Yeah, you are perfectly right about the MD to Ph.D program of UM. I was attracted to this program and moved to Florida for it three years ago. It doesn't exit any more and I found out that it's impossible for foreingers to get in the MD program of UM. All the MD students are from universities of North America. And they are required to be either citizens or green card holder.

I am kind of in the same boat: With a BS from China and Ph.D from US in Biological sciences, I am taking MCAT of this August. I just received my green card last month. I don't know the chance of my getting in any MD program. But I will have a try, or I will regret when I'm 40.

Dear Kimberli Cox,

Based on my information, do you think that I have any chance to get in other universities other than UM?

Thanks a lot
Your best chances are at private universities (ie, University of Miami is a state supported school and as such, is required to take a vast majority of state tax paying citizens) or applying through a combined MD/PhD program. I know you already have a PhD but consider that most of these tracts are:

a) geared toward academic or research oriented individuals which it sounds as if you may be;

b) often pay your tuition or provide you with a stipend. Remember medical education in the US is extremely expensive and you may likely require loans to pay for tuition and living expenses.

However, now that you have your green card, your chances are much greater than if you were not a citizen. If you do well on the MCAT and have recent academic achievement and clinical experience, I see no reason why you would have any less of a chance to get into a US medical school. If you are a Florida state resident, then you should apply to all the state schools.
 
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