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From the US to the UK?

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walkoffhr

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Out of curiosity, I would like to know what my options are.

First of all, I despise the current US health care system, but this is my home. My family, my life is all here. But lately I've been wondering what it would be like to go to school and live and practice in the UK. Can anybody point me in the right direction for finding this kind of information? Is there any website similar to the AAMC?

Thanks a lot everybody.
 

leorl

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for the uk, you can try www.nhs.uk (National Health Service).

However, I really do not think you should base a move on you not liking the US healthcare system. There are a ton of things not to like about a socialized system too, and the big thing you'll realize is that there is actually no perfect system. Each country just has to make do with the system it's got. There are ways the US system can improve, but trying to implement things from another system is going to be very difficult because the US is too large for it to work on a national level.

There's a lot of red tape and it's not simply a case of packing up and moving. It is also going to get very difficult for non-EU citizens to practice in the UK.
 

ocularphd

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I agree with leorl's comments.

But it is information you want......

Generally, medical schools here in UK and Ireland and 5-6 years in lenght depending on each school. Most students will have taken their A Level/Irish Leaving Cert (secondary school leve) before gaining entry into med school.

There are some 4 year graduate degree programs in the UK (not too sure if there are any in Ireland....I've graduated from med school some time ago! :D) which you can apply to if you have already got a Bachelors degree from a university in North America.

Once you graduate, you do a pre-registration house officer job (intern) in Ireland/ Foundation year training (2 years) in the UK. Once you gain fullo registration with each countries repsective medical council, you can apply for speciality training/residency which is generally longer than US style residencies.

There is a good quality of life in UK/Ireland, but it is costly. Property & Cars are much more expensive than the states. (Car prices especially in Ireland!). The working week involves the usually Mon-Fri, with usual on call. Ireland on call system is still old style ie 36+ hours for weekday call and may even be 81+ hours on the weekend!!!:eek: depending on speciality. With the new european working time directive, things will probably change in the future.

There is alot of red tape involved, but will be made much easier if you are a EU national. At the moment, the UK training schemes are saturated, as are the irish in a similar way.

Good luck to whatever you decide!
:luck:
 

walkoffhr

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for the uk, you can try www.nhs.uk (National Health Service).

However, I really do not think you should base a move on you not liking the US healthcare system. There are a ton of things not to like about a socialized system too, and the big thing you'll realize is that there is actually no perfect system. Each country just has to make do with the system it's got. There are ways the US system can improve, but trying to implement things from another system is going to be very difficult because the US is too large for it to work on a national level.

There's a lot of red tape and it's not simply a case of packing up and moving. It is also going to get very difficult for non-EU citizens to practice in the UK.

Thanks for the link, but it I was looking for something like the AAMC as far as medical schools/admissions requirements, etc.

I understand there is a lot of red tape, and I was hoping some on here might have an idea of exactly what type of red tape exists. Could I study there as a student, and work on getting some type of working visa or something while in school? I'm not familiar with the process in the least bit.

I think disliking a health care system is enough reason to leave. I don't think it's fair to our citizens that money making HMOs and insurance companies call the shots. I just had someone extremely close to me get in a car accident in which his car flipped 3 times in the air and landed in the woods, and he hasn't seen a doctor yet because he doesn't have any insurance or money. I want to know what my other options are besides working for that kind of health care system.

Thanks everybody.
 

walkoffhr

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I agree with leorl's comments.

But it is information you want......

Generally, medical schools here in UK and Ireland and 5-6 years in lenght depending on each school. Most students will have taken their A Level/Irish Leaving Cert (secondary school leve) before gaining entry into med school.

There are some 4 year graduate degree programs in the UK (not too sure if there are any in Ireland....I've graduated from med school some time ago! :D) which you can apply to if you have already got a Bachelors degree from a university in North America.

Once you graduate, you do a pre-registration house officer job (intern) in Ireland/ Foundation year training (2 years) in the UK. Once you gain fullo registration with each countries repsective medical council, you can apply for speciality training/residency which is generally longer than US style residencies.

There is a good quality of life in UK/Ireland, but it is costly. Property & Cars are much more expensive than the states. (Car prices especially in Ireland!). The working week involves the usually Mon-Fri, with usual on call. Ireland on call system is still old style ie 36+ hours for weekday call and may even be 81+ hours on the weekend!!!:eek: depending on speciality. With the new european working time directive, things will probably change in the future.

There is alot of red tape involved, but will be made much easier if you are a EU national. At the moment, the UK training schemes are saturated, as are the irish in a similar way.

Good luck to whatever you decide!
:luck:

So as far as the length of the education, it seems rather similar. So once I can find out what medical schools are out there and the admissions requirements, I will be all set to compare. Thanks a lot!
 

ocularphd

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UCAS is the central university applications organisation that deals with all applications.

www.ucas.com

The medical schools currently offering accelerated graduate entry courses in Medicine are:

1. Leicester Medical School
http://www.le.ac.uk/sm/le/A101_Health Sciences/ or http://www.lwms.ac.uk/ Tel: 0116 252 2969
2. Warwick Medical School
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/medicine/ or http://www.lwms.ac.uk/ Tel: 024 765 28101

3. St George's Hospital Medical School, London
http://www.sghms.ac.uk/Courses/gep.htm el: 020 8725 5201

4. University of Oxford
http://bmra.pharm.ox.ac.uk/ or http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/grad/medicine.shtml Tel: 01865 270211

5. University of Cambridge
http://www.cam.ac.uk/cambuniv/ugprospectus/courses/medicine5.html Tel: 01223 336709

6. University of Newcastle
http://medical.faculty.ncl.ac.uk/undergrad/medicine/admissions/accelerated_programme Tel: 0191 226107

6. University of Birmingham
http://www.undergraduate.bham.ac.uk/programmes/medgrad.htm Tel: 0121 4146888

7. University of Bristol
http://www.medici.bris.ac.uk/general/Undergraduate/graduate.html Tel: 0117 954 6965

8. Barts and the London Medical School, Queen Mary London
http://www.mds.qmw.ac.uk/courses/gep.shtml Tel: 020 7601 7603

9. University of Nottingham
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/mhs/GEM/index.htm Tel: 01332 347141 Ex 264

10. University of Liverpool
http://www.liv.ac.uk/facultymedicin...dents/mbchb 4 yr graduate programme/index.htm Tel: (0) 151 706 4266

11. University of Southampton
http://www.som.soton.ac.uk/prospectus/undergrad/bm4.asp Tel: 023 80594408

12. University of Wales Swansea
http://www.medicine.swan.ac.uk/ Tel: 01792 513 400

13. King’s College, London
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ugp05/programme.php?getid=649 Tel: 020-7848 6501

Information about courses can also be found on the UCAS website at: http://www.ucas.ac.uk
Tel: 01242 223707


As long as you get in, you are "guaranteed" a foundation year training post lasting 2 years that will enable you to gain GMC registration. "Guaranteed" for non UK/EU graduates at the moment, but who knows what the job situation will be like in 6-7 years time when you finish. You will not be able to apply for specialist training if you are not UK/EU status. If you cover the 6 years you will be hypothetically here, it will not grant you PR status. Unless you have claim to British/EU citizenship, then you may be stuck.

Best of luck in your decisions.
:luck:
 

ozzidoc

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Good post. One thing: GMC registration occurs after F1.
 

Kev (UK)

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Good post. One thing: GMC registration occurs after F1.
Full registration is after F1 but you have provisional registration from start of F1 which limits you to working under supervision and only being able to prescribe on a hospital drug chart. Successful completion of F1 leads to full registration.
 

gmacpac

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I had called these program, and most of them DO NOT accept foreign applications for the 4 year program. (ex, Birmingham, Swansea, Briston, Imperial, KCL etc etc)

I would suggest that you call each program and find out if they will take your application.
 
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