MT2MD

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I am working full time night shift and studying for the May 22. It's been so hard on my life, physically and mentally. Here's my schedule

12am-8am work
Get home around 9:30am
Sleep till around 5:30pm
Arrive at the Hospital 7:45pm ish...
Study till work time.

(cant quit work unless I want to live on the street)

I need some encouragement, anyone else in my situation? :(
 
Mar 11, 2010
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Are you sure you're not gonna be a mess when you have to take the test during your normal sleep time?
 

Kouger86

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I am working full time night shift and studying for the May 22. It's been so hard on my life, physically and mentally. Here's my schedule

12am-8am work
Get home around 9:30am
Sleep till around 5:30pm
Arrive at the Hospital 7:45pm ish...
Study till work time.

(cant quit work unless I want to live on the street)

I need some encouragement, anyone else in my situation? :(
Same situation, dude.

I work nights only, Full time. Currently studying with TBR for Physical sciences and orgo; and EK for Bio/Verbal. Just started TBR books. They are massive. Goal is to finish them by 04/27 and have a month for FLs.

Not sure how well that plan is gonna go down, but will try my best to stick to it.

Im always counting the hours in the day, trying to make sure I study at least 2-3/daily. And when I do get a chance to study, Im so fricking tired.

I, like yourself, am in a position where I have to work!!! got bills to pay.

anyways, good luck, we'll make it, if we keep at it.:xf:
 
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Similar situation but working full-time during the day. It is a killer and I really underestimated the amount of time I would need to study for this.

I find that on average, I have about 4 hours to:
-go to the gym
-cook/eat dinner
-take care of personal stuff
-errands
-and try and cram 2 hours of studying in.

I've been doing it now for 12 weeks and still not done content review!
 
Jun 4, 2009
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I feel your pain friend. Here's my schedule:

-Work 7am-6pm (long hours due to lots of work).
-Come home, eat, and rest for about 2 hours.
-Study 9pm-1am.
-Sleep 1am-6am
-Do it again.

I try to make up for lost time during the wknds.

I'm also preparing for the May 21st test. Just got done with the TBR physics and g-chem books. About to start the TBR o-chem and still need to purchase bio and verbal reasoning material. Will probably buy EK for those.

Hang in there, all we can do is try our best, the rest is up the the Big Man up above..
 
Last edited:

RokKidA

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I've been working full time and I've found that consistency is the most important part of your routine. Just study and keep up with a schedule and you should be all right. Don't be too hard on yourself if you get a bit off track on your schedule, but you need to be diligent and not be distracted when you study.
 

MT2MD

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Are you sure you're not gonna be a mess when you have to take the test during your normal sleep time?
I have scheduled a 4 days vacation right before I take my test to change my sleep cycle
 

MegaSpectacular

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I am working full time night shift and studying for the May 22. It's been so hard on my life, physically and mentally. Here's my schedule

12am-8am work
Get home around 9:30am
Sleep till around 5:30pm
Arrive at the Hospital 7:45pm ish...
Study till work time.

(cant quit work unless I want to live on the street)

I need some encouragement, anyone else in my situation? :(
Seems like you are commuting 90 min one way!? So 3 hrs a day of commute? This is rough, as that could be your entire study time for the day if you could eliminate it.

When you have such a large amount of your day going to something that results in nothing, that is the killer. Postpone the exam or move if you can! If not, try to study an hour less and relax a bit. 15 hrs a day is as hard as a residency; I would probably study over 4 months pretty consistently if I was full time (3 hrs a day max), and try to take a vacation week right before the exam to focus on practice exams and relax.

If you kill your energy and drive to study by ONLY studying then you can't be effective, you will hate life and won't want to go into this.

Even med students don't have 12 hrs a day of consistently work for the entire semester. Balance balance balance.

Also temper your goals, you don't want to set a goal for a 35+ when you don't have the time to study, set a goal for a 30 which should be attainable.

Look at the people scoring 35+, they aren't doing anything... but the MCAT. Rarely do you see people score high without full devotion to the MCAT. Most people are either studying full time in sciences (which helps dominate the MCAT), or they have no job and nothing to do but the MCAT. I tried to do studying during school but it is too stressful if you want to score high, so I'm applying later and giving 8 weeks with not 1 thing on my schedule...

Don't try to compete with people who have unlimited time.
 

ratherberocking

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Hey, I also work full time in a highly placed lab. I want to do MD/PhD, so you know that 40 hours a week just isn't enough. I work M-F from 8 am to 6-7pm, and on weekends for about 5 hours Sat/Sun. I basically study from 8pm - 12am and on weekends when I'm not in the lab.

As mentioned above, be consistent in studying. I started in late January and finished all the content review by mid March using SN2ed's schedule. If you all commute to work, try audio osmosis. It's cheesy, but it helps.
 

dohlo

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Seems like you are commuting 90 min one way!? So 3 hrs a day of commute? This is rough, as that could be your entire study time for the day if you could eliminate it.

When you have such a large amount of your day going to something that results in nothing, that is the killer. Postpone the exam or move if you can! If not, try to study an hour less and relax a bit. 15 hrs a day is as hard as a residency; I would probably study over 4 months pretty consistently if I was full time (3 hrs a day max), and try to take a vacation week right before the exam to focus on practice exams and relax.

If you kill your energy and drive to study by ONLY studying then you can't be effective, you will hate life and won't want to go into this.

Even med students don't have 12 hrs a day of consistently work for the entire semester. Balance balance balance.

Also temper your goals, you don't want to set a goal for a 35+ when you don't have the time to study, set a goal for a 30 which should be attainable.

Look at the people scoring 35+, they aren't doing anything... but the MCAT. Rarely do you see people score high without full devotion to the MCAT. Most people are either studying full time in sciences (which helps dominate the MCAT), or they have no job and nothing to do but the MCAT. I tried to do studying during school but it is too stressful if you want to score high, so I'm applying later and giving 8 weeks with not 1 thing on my schedule...

Don't try to compete with people who have unlimited time.
I disagree. Don't temper your goals. You have to compare yourself to the people that have nothing else to do but study because med schools are going to compare you. You just have to do whats necessary to attain your goals. I'm working 40 hours a week heres my schedule:

5-6 am wake up, shower, eat etc.
6-9am study
9-6 work
6-7 commute/unwind
7-11pm study
11-5 sleep

its fu*king tiring and every now and then I will take a morning or night off. Or start/finish an hour early, but thats pretty much how the week days go. Its possible, you just have to figure out how to make it work for you.

If you are driving 3 hrs a day get audio osmosis, tape the bernoulli equation to the bottom of your rear-view or something. Be creative and find out ways to maximize your time.

If you want to set lower goals, thats on you, but i figure that if you set a high goal and don't quite get there, you will probably get further than you would have with a low one. Set the bar high and don't stop until you reach it. its possible. It is a lot harder than if you had the luxury of time and money, but since thats not the case, sleep, study, work,study and do it all again. Its good preparation for the long days ahead.
 
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Yes i was working in a lab 40 hours a week and I had to really do some reevaluating of my life, career, and goals in life. I decided that the MCAT is my gateway to the future of medicine, and a better career, I knew that my focus had to change so I quit my job.:eek: Yes I know I know but I had a long talk with my support systems (fam, boyfriend) and we all agreed that this was the best thing for me to do. I was working in a dead end lab job and I would be at work like ok I need to be studying.

My day use to be wake up at 6am
Commute for 1 hour
Work 8-5
Gym 5-6
Home 7-8
Study (8-10)
sleep (11-6)

Now
wake up at 8 am
Study from 9-5
Break 5-6
Gym 6-7
Study 8-12

And I love it:love:, if I dont get a 40 on this test! I certainly will die trying!

So for all you guys that have to work and etc good luck , hang in there and I will see ya on the other side! For myself I just had to make the best decision for me that works for me and luckily I have a support system that understands that.

Now after i pass this test, I will work then. Giving myself 3 months to get it in gear!:xf:
 

g8orlife

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Seems like you are commuting 90 min one way!? So 3 hrs a day of commute? This is rough, as that could be your entire study time for the day if you could eliminate it.

When you have such a large amount of your day going to something that results in nothing, that is the killer. Postpone the exam or move if you can! If not, try to study an hour less and relax a bit. 15 hrs a day is as hard as a residency; I would probably study over 4 months pretty consistently if I was full time (3 hrs a day max), and try to take a vacation week right before the exam to focus on practice exams and relax.

If you kill your energy and drive to study by ONLY studying then you can't be effective, you will hate life and won't want to go into this.

Even med students don't have 12 hrs a day of consistently work for the entire semester. Balance balance balance.

Also temper your goals, you don't want to set a goal for a 35+ when you don't have the time to study, set a goal for a 30 which should be attainable.

Look at the people scoring 35+, they aren't doing anything... but the MCAT. Rarely do you see people score high without full devotion to the MCAT. Most people are either studying full time in sciences (which helps dominate the MCAT), or they have no job and nothing to do but the MCAT. I tried to do studying during school but it is too stressful if you want to score high, so I'm applying later and giving 8 weeks with not 1 thing on my schedule...

Don't try to compete with people who have unlimited time.
I agree with dohlo and NOT with the quoted text. From this quoted text, it sounds like you're saying to give up on the dream of scoring high on the MCAT, leading to a more competitive application, which would inaugurate the dream into medicine ....Which is not very helpful. :thumbdown:

The top scorers only score as high as they aim. If someone aims for a 30, then he/she may get a 28; on the flip side, if someone aims for a 36, he/she may end up with a 34. .... I really don't understand your reasoning in telling people to aim low. That may be the worst motivational piece of advice I've ever heard in my life. :thumbdown:

If you don't have anything encouraging to say on a thread where people are looking for help/advice, then don't post anything at all.

I commute 2.75 hours per day, too, and Audio Osmosis has been golden. I recommend AO to anyone else spending a nice portion of his/her day on the road.

Aim HIGH! Believe you can score well! I hope you all get 45s on your MCATs!
 

phuddl

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Mar 22, 2010
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Similar situation but working full-time during the day. It is a killer and I really underestimated the amount of time I would need to study for this.

I find that on average, I have about 4 hours to:
-go to the gym
-cook/eat dinner
-take care of personal stuff
-errands
-and try and cram 2 hours of studying in.

I've been doing it now for 12 weeks and still not done content review!
Same here! I always find it incredibly hard to actually find time/energy to study the material like it should be studied. le sigh
 

karayraisu

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Also temper your goals, you don't want to set a goal for a 35+ when you don't have the time to study, set a goal for a 30 which should be attainable.

Look at the people scoring 35+, they aren't doing anything... but the MCAT. Rarely do you see people score high without full devotion to the MCAT. Most people are either studying full time in sciences (which helps dominate the MCAT), or they have no job and nothing to do but the MCAT. I tried to do studying during school but it is too stressful if you want to score high, so I'm applying later and giving 8 weeks with not 1 thing on my schedule...

Don't try to compete with people who have unlimited time.
I think this is pretty good advice actually. I go to a very competitive university and I'm taking six academic classes which require around 12-15 straight hours of straight work (classes + prep) every day. If you factor in sleep and eating and walking time, that basically leaves NO time at all to prep for the MCAT. I took the 1/30 test and voided thinking that I'll benefit from two more months of studying (we have a January term which I took half off to study), but I was having trouble fitting even an hour or so of MCAT prep every day. I was averaging only 5 or 6 hours a week prior to this last week, which was spring break, when I put in a full 80 hours-ish but I don't think it was quite enough.

To aim for 35+, you either have to be really naturally smart or be able to budget your time on a clockwork schedule for at least 3 months with work or a full academic load. It takes a lot of time to break that 35 barrier and ideally you should really aim for at least 4 weeks of doing NOTHING and just focusing on the MCAT. With 30 I think it is much more doable but then again, like what people said, balance is the key.
 

samuraiR

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I'm on a similar schedule with the added bonus of taking organic chem 2.

7-8:15 = wake up get ready eat etc
8:30-5 = work
mon and wed 5:15-9 orgo 2 and lab
otherwise get home eat/shower/personal errands/study for orgo/gym/mcat.
i try to study 2-3 hours a day for the mcat, but i've been slacking recently. I' mostly done with content review and scoring pretty well on the review so far. Hopefully I can keep it up.

I'm taking the mcats either may 22nd or may 27th.

Good luck all
 

luckyducky87

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I just took the MCAT yesterday. I work full time in a research lab right now (since fall 2009), which in reality means working 50-60 hours a week, including weekends. Plus the crazy Boston commute. Well, anyway, I started studying on the first week of January, and I've been so miserable since. I'm afraid I scared some of my labmates away because I was ridiculously sensitive by the end of February. Sigh. I guess we'll see if it all was worth it.
 

g8orlife

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I think this is pretty good advice actually. I go to a very competitive university and I'm taking six academic classes which require around 12-15 straight hours of straight work (classes + prep) every day. If you factor in sleep and eating and walking time, that basically leaves NO time at all to prep for the MCAT. I took the 1/30 test and voided thinking that I'll benefit from two more months of studying (we have a January term which I took half off to study), but I was having trouble fitting even an hour or so of MCAT prep every day. I was averaging only 5 or 6 hours a week prior to this last week, which was spring break, when I put in a full 80 hours-ish but I don't think it was quite enough.

To aim for 35+, you either have to be really naturally smart or be able to budget your time on a clockwork schedule for at least 3 months with work or a full academic load. It takes a lot of time to break that 35 barrier and ideally you should really aim for at least 4 weeks of doing NOTHING and just focusing on the MCAT. With 30 I think it is much more doable but then again, like what people said, balance is the key.
Once again, you're not understanding. Did you even read the OP's post? He is NOT looking for someone to give him a new study schedule. He has already started his, is stuck in it, and has to make the best of it. (Like the rest of us in this thread)

You are not helping by telling him that what he's doing is not as good as what you're doing. Save your "How to make the best study schedule" advice for another thread where the OP has not begun/is just beginning his/her MCAT studies.

The OP is looking for support from others in his postition. Take a look at everyone else's posts in this thread, because they fit his question. Yours do not.
 

MegaSpectacular

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I agree with dohlo and NOT with the quoted text. From this quoted text, it sounds like you're saying to give up on the dream of scoring high on the MCAT, leading to a more competitive application, which would inaugurate the dream into medicine ....Which is not very helpful. :thumbdown:

The top scorers only score as high as they aim. If someone aims for a 30, then he/she may get a 28; on the flip side, if someone aims for a 36, he/she may end up with a 34. .... I really don't understand your reasoning in telling people to aim low. That may be the worst motivational piece of advice I've ever heard in my life. :thumbdown:

If you don't have anything encouraging to say on a thread where people are looking for help/advice, then don't post anything at all.

I commute 2.75 hours per day, too, and Audio Osmosis has been golden. I recommend AO to anyone else spending a nice portion of his/her day on the road.

Aim HIGH! Believe you can score well! I hope you all get 45s on your MCATs!
lol, I'm not trying to demotivate. I think people should set up realistic expectations. The specific person we are talking about has a 3 hour commute and is busy every waking hour.

I know people who have studied during 40 hr a week jobs but they usually don't have a 3 hour commute. Audio Osmosis won't do too much, the MCAT is about problem solving. I took into note that the person is working in a hospital also and not a research lab. A guy who recently scored 40+ released his schedule in full and he had to spend virtually no time on bio because he worked in a bio lab! People don't understand these subtleties when they read, guy ___ studied 3 hrs a day and had a full time job. Or guy ___ only studied one month.

If you have a super strong science background or work in a lab, then you can focus your prep into weak areas. This person is burning out and I've had schedules like this, I can't imagine him being productive long term with the drain mentally and emotionally from studying every free moment off work.

So... I would say not to set a goal above a 33 or so, I would go for 11/11/11 or 10/10/10 if I had a schedule like that. If you add commute, he has a 60 hr a week job... now lets ask people how effective you can be in MCAT prep with a 60 hr a week job, should I set a goal for a 40?

I think it is ok to say set a goal that you can reach, that will get you into some medical schools, rather than to say. "Yeah, with 60 hrs a week tied up and being mentally and emotionally exhausted you can score in the 99th percentile!" Most people who do this aren't doing anything but science stuff all day (even if it isn't exactly MCAT science stuff).

Aim HIGH! Believe you can score well! I hope you all get 45s on your MCATs!
I hope this is a joke. I can't remember when the last 45 was scored, years and years ago?

It just is bad advice to tell someone, "yeah, kill yourself to do well on the MCAT" while the plan provided obviously is overloaded and will not lead to success. Then to score low while others score high and say, "wow, look at all these people getting 35+ on the MCAT, I must not be cut out to be a doctor." Looking more closely, the people scoring high have devoted HOUR and HOURS of free time to science activities OR the MCAT. Every hour they are awake and working is MCAT, and then they rest up when they aren't studying (or they work in a related field like research, which actually is good because MCAT passages will be easier for them). These are the people who get discouraged and think they don't have it in them, when in reality over-motivated advice is causing them to give up.
 
Last edited:

MegaSpectacular

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I think this is pretty good advice actually. I go to a very competitive university and I'm taking six academic classes which require around 12-15 straight hours of straight work (classes + prep) every day. If you factor in sleep and eating and walking time, that basically leaves NO time at all to prep for the MCAT. I took the 1/30 test and voided thinking that I'll benefit from two more months of studying (we have a January term which I took half off to study), but I was having trouble fitting even an hour or so of MCAT prep every day. I was averaging only 5 or 6 hours a week prior to this last week, which was spring break, when I put in a full 80 hours-ish but I don't think it was quite enough.

To aim for 35+, you either have to be really naturally smart or be able to budget your time on a clockwork schedule for at least 3 months with work or a full academic load. It takes a lot of time to break that 35 barrier and ideally you should really aim for at least 4 weeks of doing NOTHING and just focusing on the MCAT. With 30 I think it is much more doable but then again, like what people said, balance is the key.
Thx... :)

I honestly didn't say anything negative before. I think anyone with common sense who has either taken the MCAT before or studied prep in depth from the best scorers would agree that you need to give yourself time to prepare.

I simply have said, "if you have 60 hrs tied up doing non-MCAT and non-science related activites, you should not set a goal to score 35+ because it could be disheartening." impossible? no. but given the emotional/physical wear of being busy every waking hour will not result in a great learning environment.

SO... I'm saying set the goal for a balanced 30 or 33, which I think is fine.
 

MegaSpectacular

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I commute 2.75 hours per day, too, and Audio Osmosis has been golden. I recommend AO to anyone else spending a nice portion of his/her day on the road.
lol, tell us how Audio Osmosis works for you. Many people who used Audio Osmosis said it was worthless for the last few MCATs. This isn't regurgitation, it is problem solving. Knowing AO backwards and forwards is 100% different from reading a complex passage and solving a problem with it.

Please post your schedule (+ career) to compare with the other guy, I don't think we are talking about the same situation. Also I will be watching for your score posted post-MCAT :thumbup:

What I've advocated is nothing more than anyone with sense tells others on this site:

Give yourself plenty of time to study and prepare throughly

If you are lacking in time, it will be harder to succeed.
 

MegaSpectacular

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Yes i was working in a lab 40 hours a week and I had to really do some reevaluating of my life, career, and goals in life. I decided that the MCAT is my gateway to the future of medicine, and a better career, I knew that my focus had to change so I quit my job.:eek: Yes I know I know but I had a long talk with my support systems (fam, boyfriend) and we all agreed that this was the best thing for me to do. I was working in a dead end lab job and I would be at work like ok I need to be studying.

My day use to be wake up at 6am
Commute for 1 hour
Work 8-5
Gym 5-6
Home 7-8
Study (8-10)
sleep (11-6)

Now
wake up at 8 am
Study from 9-5
Break 5-6
Gym 6-7
Study 8-12

And I love it:love:, if I dont get a 40 on this test! I certainly will die trying!

So for all you guys that have to work and etc good luck , hang in there and I will see ya on the other side! For myself I just had to make the best decision for me that works for me and luckily I have a support system that understands that.

Now after i pass this test, I will work then. Giving myself 3 months to get it in gear!:xf:
true story... :thumbup: good luck. 36+ is as good as 40 in admissions eyes btw.:)

that is a lot of study time in one day... 12 hours is back breaking. I wouldn't recommend for anyone to schedule more than 7 or 8. The brain needs rest. :)
 

clc8503

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I have scheduled a 4 days vacation right before I take my test to change my sleep cycle
Are you sure that 4 days will be enough? Above all else, one critical factor to consider when taking the MCAT is rather or not you obtain a good night sleep. The reason I say this is because I work nights as well (CLS in Hospital). The first time I took the MCAT I only gave a myself a 3 day vacation. I found that with all the last minute anxiety meshed with my nocturnal sleep habits, I could not sleep a wink the night before my test. As result, I did horrible on the MCAT. My VR score reflected someone who didn't even speak English a his or her first language, and I was so tired that I only read 5 of the 7 passages, due to rereading the material, lol. However, when I took the MCAT the second time around, I knew I had to make my first attempt look like a fluke . I took off 7 days from work, studied like a mad man, and readjusted my sleep patterns. In the end, it paid off! Not only did I finish VR early and improve my score by a quantum leap, I scored higher than I did on any of the AAMC practice tests. The point Im trying to make is this: Studying is already tough when you work full-time. Its even tougher when you do it at night. Do not underestimate the power of a good night sleep before the exam, so be sure you give your time to readjust.
 

LaZigeuner

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OP, I work as well, though not nights, and am taking 2 classes. I'm shooting for the 5/27 MCAT. Yes, preparing for it is challenging, mainly in an "energy managment" way.

Here are some suggestions that I'm trying myself:

1) Do you have any breaks when you work---10/15 minutes here or there? Can you review flashcards, or do a passage, or listen to some AO? Conversely, what about diligently using breaks for energy management---take a walk or do some stretching if you've been sitting, or sit back with closed eyes and do some deep breathing, or listen to your favorite music (either that perks you up or calms you, or whatever)? If you've been inside, can you go outside for some breaths of fresh air? If you use your break for a pitstop, what about splashing some warm or cool water on your face? Brushing your teeth might be helpful, too (it is for me).

2) I don't remember if you mentioned what type of work you do. Is there anyway you can relate anything on the MCAT with your work? For example, my work includes a lot of reading, so sometimes I think of what I'm reading in terms of a VR passage---what's the main point? What biases does (or might) the author exhibit? If I take the author's position and extrapolate/apply it to (some topic, like health care), what would s/he think? Or if you work in a research/health care setting---does anything you deal with allow you to relate bits of it maybe to anything in Bio---what do you know from Bio that would help you think about the patient/research you're working on? What from physics? Anything from Gen Chem or O-Chem?

3) During breaks/down time, pull out a practice problem/passage you've done recently that you bombed or aced. Now that you know the right answer/s if you didn't already---if you missed a question, how could you have figured out the right answer? If you got it right, is there any way you could have figured it out faster? Regardless, what's the shortest way to the right answer, and does that way make sense? Why did you miss the question, if you did? Make a note/flashcard of the fact/concept/definition/relationship/whatever and glance at it a couple more times during work.

4) If there's a fair amount of time during your work hours when your brain isn't actively engaged in work, do you have MCAT stuff in formats you can use? For example, if you are lifting and moving stuff and it's not very dangerous, can you listen to AO? Even if the MCAT today is concept heavy, it can be handy---pause it every now and then to relate what you've just heard to something you're working with right that moment, or to another concept from the MCAT (kind of like SN2ed's Hat Trick).

It's hard, but not impossible. For me, the hardest thing is being efficient: time/energy management.

Finally, re. that 4-day adjustment period. Please make sure that is a realistic adjustment period, given the nature of the adjustment and the possible stress/tension as you approach your MCAT. Is it possible to expand the 4 days, and would that help? If not, do you have a strategy for making the adjustment? Like melatonin and food, and maybe cutting back on caffeine NOW, so if you have to use some then, it will be more effective without giving you the jitters? Timing of exercise, waking, rising, etc? Just suggestions---I know for me, the better I plan, the better chance for success.

Good luck! :luck: We can do this! :)
 

MT2MD

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Hi, I want to thank everyone for the advice and encouragements. My transportation is around 3 hrs, but I take the subway so I am also studying on the subway. My theory is if I can finish a passage in 7-8 min on the subway and get a consistent 9-10, than I can probably do better on the real thing (probably wishful thinking).

I am following Sn2ed's four months schedule and I am around 2-3 days behind schedule so I should be fine.

I am pretty solid with other parts of my application and the MCAT is probably the only obstacles I have left. I really don't want to postpone a year since I am turning 24 in a few months.

I get some studying done during lunch break, but I usually use the time to wind down. I am a medical technologist in the hospital and I am responsible for the critical test in microbiology. I am a new graduate. It is a very high pressure environment since I am the only microbiology technologist at night, knowing that my testings and results could affect a patient's treatment.

I guess all I could do now is to stay positive.
 

BlameItOnTheOH

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Hey OP, I'm also a full-time MT working nights and I feel your pain! I've just tried to do about 2 hours of productive studying each evening with my full length tests saved for my weekends off! Its rough but will be over soon enough! ( less than 2 weeks for me!)...

...A little off topic, but to the OP, clc8503, and any other Med Techs who have replied...where do you guys plan to include your medical technology internship (if you did one) on AAMCAS and/or AACOMAS? Are you going to sumbit a "transcript" from the program? I got letter grades in the program I did and definitely want to include them on my app; I feel like I would be implying my grades weren't good if I didn't include them. ha. Its tough to see where it fits because its obviously not a graduate program but was also not related to my undergrad institution at all. Help?
 
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Working Full-time sucks!
Guys, I am planning to take MCAT around early 2011.
I am buying TBR books (once I figure out how to order them). I already am enrolled in Online Kaplan course (renewing it). I just want to take MCAT once and score well.

Working full-time is not working for me...I can't do intense study as I was used to (When I had taken 3 months off from work)...

I am gonna quit working some time..but, just can't figure out when to quit?? Since I am taking it next year, I have enough time for MCAT but can't make up my mind when to quit full-time job? Now or in September or something?

What do u think?
 

samuraiR

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do u need the money? got bills to pay? got family to support?
answer yes to any of those questions and I say you man (or woman) up and dont quit, manage ur time and rock the test....

if all of those answers are no, then might as well quit now, study hardcore for 3-4 months, take the mcat sooner and start working again after
 

g8orlife

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WOW! Dang, you wrote a lot! I leave SDN for a while just to come back and have to read a novel!:rolleyes:

Please post your schedule (+ career) to compare with the other guy, I don't think we are talking about the same situation.
fine.

PA-C working 3 12-hour shifts/week.

Other days:
7-9 = study
10-11:20 = drive
12-3 = class
4-9 = study
10-11:20 = drive
(gaps = eat, bathroom, errands)

What different situation are you referring to?

Many people who used Audio Osmosis said it was worthless for the last few MCATs.
I appreciate the heads up; but I'm still going to use it, because I'd prefer to be constructive even while on the road.

I hope this is a joke. I can't remember when the last 45 was scored, years and years ago?
My current Biochem TA scored a 45 on her MCAT.

Also I will be watching for your score posted post-MCAT :thumbup:
.
Good for you :thumbup:
Thx... :)
SO... I'm saying set the goal for a balanced 30 or 33, which I think is fine.
Ok, that's fine for you, but some people prefer to aim as high as possible so that they can always say that they tried as hard as possible. They never look back in regret and say, "Gosh, I wish I had ..."

My Physics mentor/tutor scored a 43, and I liked his quote: "Everyone should be going for a 45. You should get pissed when you even get one wrong."

I don't know about you... but when I hear something like that, it makes me want to study and learn as much from my mistakes as possible.

I prefer to push myself as much as possible because I understand that it's perseverence and time(which you did mention) which make people succeed. Anyone who has succeeded in a competitive sport knows the feeling of practicing as hard as possible; because in the back of her mind, she knows that her opponent is preparing just as much for her.

As bleargh would say, "45T or go home"

word. 45t or gtfo
Good luck in your studies. I hope you get the next 45.
 

PhilIvey

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lol, I'm not trying to demotivate. I think people should set up realistic expectations. The specific person we are talking about has a 3 hour commute and is busy every waking hour.

I know people who have studied during 40 hr a week jobs but they usually don't have a 3 hour commute. Audio Osmosis won't do too much, the MCAT is about problem solving. I took into note that the person is working in a hospital also and not a research lab. A guy who recently scored 40+ released his schedule in full and he had to spend virtually no time on bio because he worked in a bio lab! People don't understand these subtleties when they read, guy ___ studied 3 hrs a day and had a full time job. Or guy ___ only studied one month.

If you have a super strong science background or work in a lab, then you can focus your prep into weak areas. This person is burning out and I've had schedules like this, I can't imagine him being productive long term with the drain mentally and emotionally from studying every free moment off work.

So... I would say not to set a goal above a 33 or so, I would go for 11/11/11 or 10/10/10 if I had a schedule like that. If you add commute, he has a 60 hr a week job... now lets ask people how effective you can be in MCAT prep with a 60 hr a week job, should I set a goal for a 40?

I think it is ok to say set a goal that you can reach, that will get you into some medical schools, rather than to say. "Yeah, with 60 hrs a week tied up and being mentally and emotionally exhausted you can score in the 99th percentile!" Most people who do this aren't doing anything but science stuff all day (even if it isn't exactly MCAT science stuff).


I hope this is a joke. I can't remember when the last 45 was scored, years and years ago?

It just is bad advice to tell someone, "yeah, kill yourself to do well on the MCAT" while the plan provided obviously is overloaded and will not lead to success. Then to score low while others score high and say, "wow, look at all these people getting 35+ on the MCAT, I must not be cut out to be a doctor." Looking more closely, the people scoring high have devoted HOUR and HOURS of free time to science activities OR the MCAT. Every hour they are awake and working is MCAT, and then they rest up when they aren't studying (or they work in a related field like research, which actually is good because MCAT passages will be easier for them). These are the people who get discouraged and think they don't have it in them, when in reality over-motivated advice is causing them to give up.
This is awful advice. I took it on 3/27. I studied 4 weeks 12-16 hours a day with a break every 5 or 6 days. It's not about how much but how efficiently you study. I think it's hilarious that people think MCAT score is correlated with how much you study. It's not. Get the list of topics off the AAMC site and make sure you have everything covered.

My only practice was AAMC 5, 7, and 8 (old longer versions) and I averaged a 37. That is among the dumbest advice I've ever seen given. Ignore mega. It's hard but grind it out and you should be done with content by end of April. You should aim for may 27 or june 17 and you should be ready. GL
 

315033

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I'm going to give you some hard, honest advice.

You need to quit your night job as it's going to **** up your performance on the real exam and put you in poor health.

To be honest, if you're complaining (which is UNDERSTANDABLE)/getting jaded/irritated now, you're going to burn out very soon.

Either cut the hours (if your job permits or if you can find another one), or drop work for 4-6 months.

If it means moving in back with mommy and/or daddy, or a friend, then DO it if you are convinced that medicine is the only path for the rest of your future.

And trust me, I've been down that road before working a full time job, while doing a full time course load, and trying the MCAT, it DOES NOT work. YOU WILL MOST LIKELY FAIL TO MEET YOUR GOALS.

I ended up delaying the MCAT when I took it the last time (36M and so far 1 acceptance with 3.4 GPA), and so I cut the hours to part time (about 18 hours a week which was enough to pay for rent/food/gas/pay any interest on my ~$15,000 student loans).

I was lucky that my job was laid back (security guard, GREAT JOB BTW IF YOU WANT TO DO STUDYING!) and during the day and not night.

Worst comes to worst, move back with mom or dad/risk letting the loans grow a little more if you have debt --- we're only talking 2-5 months realistically.

And this goes out to all of you research technician-folks too who theoretically work 40 hours a week but work more like 60-70 hours a week (trust me I've been there and it SUCKS!)
 
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PhilIvey

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I'm going to give you some hard, honest advice.

You need to quit your night job as it's going to **** up your performance on the real exam and put you in poor health.

To be honest, if you're complaining (which is UNDERSTANDABLE)/getting jaded/irritated now, you're going to burn out very soon.

Either cut the hours (if your job permits or if you can find another one), or drop work for 4-6 months.

If it means moving in back with mommy and/or daddy, or a friend, then DO it if you are convinced that medicine is the only path for the rest of your future.

And trust me, I've been down that road before working a full time job, while doing a full time course load, and trying the MCAT, it DOES NOT work. YOU WILL MOST LIKELY FAIL TO MEET YOUR GOALS.

I ended up delaying the MCAT when I took it the last time (36M and so far 1 acceptance with 3.4 GPA), and so I cut the hours to part time (about 18 hours a week which was enough to pay for rent/food/gas/pay any interest on my ~$15,000 student loans).

I was lucky that my job was laid back (security guard, GREAT JOB BTW IF YOU WANT TO DO STUDYING!) and during the day and not night.

Worst comes to worst, move back with mom or dad/risk letting the loans grow a little more if you have debt --- we're only talking 2-5 months realistically.

And this goes out to all of you research technician-folks too who theoretically work 40 hours a week but work more like 60-70 hours a week (trust me I've been there and it SUCKS!)
Great post.
 

A25A

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MegaSpectacular
Many people who used Audio Osmosis said it was worthless for the last few MCATs.

I appreciate the heads up; but I'm still going to use it, because I'd prefer to be constructive even while on the road.


I'm with g8orlife on this one. All I listen to during rush hour is Audio Osmosis or Audiolearn. The only bad thing about Audiolearn is the narrator is very monotonous.

I don't see how listening to material is bad or "worthless"... you're already in the car, thinking about how you should be studying... might as well bestudying! It's not like that's the only source of material.

Good luck to the OP and to everyone else! :)
 
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Working full-time for now...but not working for my MCAT prep.

Was just wondering how to restart my MCAT prep from BASICS!!

Should I go over my Kaplan material or TBR? or both individually or at same time and all....planning to take it in Early 2011 (it will take me more time to prepare ...since verbal kills me). I am planning to buy those TBR books for sure. I am already enrolled in Kaplan online class ($2k).

How do I even start studying for this stuff? I liked Kaplan...it helped me raise my score to 22 :) kaplan practice tests only. I have not taken real deal yet. i want to take it once but score well that time.
I can definetly improve ps/bs for sure...verbal will kill me I know. But, can't figure out how to restart my MCAT prep back again!

Suggestions??? If I quit working which pays 6 figures...it won't hurt me by much (I can find part-time job). But, should I quit now (if I plan to take it in Jan-Feb? Or wait till September?????

I'm going to give you some hard, honest advice.

You need to quit your night job as it's going to **** up your performance on the real exam and put you in poor health.

To be honest, if you're complaining (which is UNDERSTANDABLE)/getting jaded/irritated now, you're going to burn out very soon.

Either cut the hours (if your job permits or if you can find another one), or drop work for 4-6 months.

If it means moving in back with mommy and/or daddy, or a friend, then DO it if you are convinced that medicine is the only path for the rest of your future.

And trust me, I've been down that road before working a full time job, while doing a full time course load, and trying the MCAT, it DOES NOT work. YOU WILL MOST LIKELY FAIL TO MEET YOUR GOALS.

I ended up delaying the MCAT when I took it the last time (36M and so far 1 acceptance with 3.4 GPA), and so I cut the hours to part time (about 18 hours a week which was enough to pay for rent/food/gas/pay any interest on my ~$15,000 student loans).

I was lucky that my job was laid back (security guard, GREAT JOB BTW IF YOU WANT TO DO STUDYING!) and during the day and not night.

Worst comes to worst, move back with mom or dad/risk letting the loans grow a little more if you have debt --- we're only talking 2-5 months realistically.

And this goes out to all of you research technician-folks too who theoretically work 40 hours a week but work more like 60-70 hours a week (trust me I've been there and it SUCKS!)
 

315033

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If you're making 6 figures I think that's a different story. You have to consider the opportunity costs and pros/cons of each decision. If you're a lab tech making $8-20 an hour then it doesn't make much sense to go full time. Your gains in the long run are so minimal that it just doesn't make sense to waste all those precious hours making an insignificant amount in the long run if your goal is to become a doctor.

But if you're a professional who's making close or above 100k a year, then you're making serious money and I wouldn't quit but try to reduce the hours/go part time and make 50% if possible.

If I was in your shoes, I wouldn't quit the job, or if possible, try to work part time at your job/similar job and get paid 50k a year working 20-30 hours a week (not sure how many you're working now). Working part-time would be the best of both worlds and ideal in my opinion.


As to your question about Kaplan or TBR? I say 1) Princeton Review for content review and supplement with TBR material for practice material (use the TPR material for practice as well!) 2) The Kaplan class is a waste of money. Cancel/get a refund it if you can. I am **dead serious.** 3) Use the SN2ED schedule to study for the MCAT which is stickied in this forum.



Working full-time for now...but not working for my MCAT prep.

Was just wondering how to restart my MCAT prep from BASICS!!

Should I go over my Kaplan material or TBR? or both individually or at same time and all....planning to take it in Early 2011 (it will take me more time to prepare ...since verbal kills me). I am planning to buy those TBR books for sure. I am already enrolled in Kaplan online class ($2k).

How do I even start studying for this stuff? I liked Kaplan...it helped me raise my score to 22 :) kaplan practice tests only. I have not taken real deal yet. i want to take it once but score well that time.
I can definetly improve ps/bs for sure...verbal will kill me I know. But, can't figure out how to restart my MCAT prep back again!

Suggestions??? If I quit working which pays 6 figures...it won't hurt me by much (I can find part-time job). But, should I quit now (if I plan to take it in Jan-Feb? Or wait till September?????
 

MegaSpectacular

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This is awful advice. I took it on 3/27. I studied 4 weeks 12-16 hours a day with a break every 5 or 6 days. It's not about how much but how efficiently you study. I think it's hilarious that people think MCAT score is correlated with how much you study. It's not. Get the list of topics off the AAMC site and make sure you have everything covered.

My only practice was AAMC 5, 7, and 8 (old longer versions) and I averaged a 37. That is among the dumbest advice I've ever seen given. Ignore mega. It's hard but grind it out and you should be done with content by end of April. You should aim for may 27 or june 17 and you should be ready. GL
Lol at lack of relevance, telling him about your 12-16 hour days does no good to help his situation.

If anything you are only reiterating what I said, that you have little to do other than the MCAT and you are spending all your time on it. If anything, you are spending MORE time on the MCAT than I was saying. I know people who prep 3 hrs a day over a few months, so doing 12-16 over 4 weeks is very excessive.

Use that MCAT math you worked on real quick to realize, him studying 3 hrs a day would equal 4 to 5 months of prep time just to EQUAL how much time you spent... Plus, spreading out the studying over 4-5 months would mean retaining much less than concentrating it.

I find it funny that you spent much more time than I was talking about but you are making the point that time spent doesn't matter.

Everyone knows this:

It's not about how much but how efficiently you study.
but it just is funny to hear from a guy spending 12-16 hours a day studying.

Ironic?

I think you overdid it buddy, it isn't that hard.
 
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PhilIvey

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Lol at lack of relevance, telling him about your 12-16 hour days does no good to help his situation.

If anything you are only reiterating what I said, that you have little to do other than the MCAT and you are spending all your time on it. If anything, you are spending MORE time on the MCAT than I was saying. I know people who prep 3 hrs a day over a few months, so doing 12-16 over 4 weeks is very excessive.

Use that MCAT math you worked on real quick to realize, him studying 3 hrs a day would equal 4 to 5 months of prep time just to EQUAL how much time you spent... Plus, spreading out the studying over 4-5 months would mean retaining much less than concentrating it.

I find it funny that you spent much more time than I was talking about but you are making the point that time spent doesn't matter.

Everyone knows this:



but it just is funny to hear from a guy spending 12-16 hours a day studying.

Ironic?

I think you overdid it buddy, it isn't that hard.
You have no reasoning abilities. The average kid studies for about 300 hours. I did in 4 weeks what most do in 3 months. I wanted to get it over with. The OP obviously can't do this. Don't belittle others just because you likely can't hit 38 plus. Hmm, I'm out of college 3 years, so no, 12-16 hours is NOT overkill. I took one month off of work to study because that's all I had. The other kids are still in school so of course they don't have to to what I did.

In addition, I think it's hilarious that you think telling someone to lower their goals is helpful. Getting a 35 isn't hard, a 40 on the other hand is. It's interesting how numerous people criticized your obviously terrible advice but we're in the wrong here.

In closing, seeing that it is unlikely the OP can take off work like I and study4eva did, I simply pointed out that he/she can still go for a 38 which you foolishly stated wasn't really possible based on the limited amount. Also, when I say 12-16 hours a day, that is including surfing the web, it was more like 8 -10 hours of actual work 5 days a week for 4 weeks leading up to the test. So, I logged in about 220 hours which is decent. If the OP can put in 15 hours a week and 60 hours per month, then he/she will be able to obtain about 200 hours which is a fair amount to shoot for. How did I support you. Good luck with verbal. The implication was one can either get 200 hours quickly or methodically so the OP need not despair. LOL
 
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MegaSpectacular

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I wanted to get it over with. The OP obviously can't do this. Don't belittle others just because you likely can't hit 38 plus. Hmm, I'm out of college 3 years, so no, 12-16 hours is NOT overkill. I took one month off of work to study because that's all I had. The other kids are still in school so of course they don't have to to what I did.
Studying 60-90 hours a week for the MCAT is ridiculous.

You are spending the same amount of time in one day that the OP can spend in a week.

I'm telling the OP to not try and compete with crazy people who spend 60-90hrs a week studying because the OP doesn't have the luxury. It make sense. People like you who tell the OP to try and score in the 99th percentile, aren't helping.

also, if you don't score a 40+ I think that is a failure because I've never heard of anyone studying so much. You are in the 99.999th percentile in hours spent per week studying. Actual, probably the 100th percentile in hours spent studying per week.
 
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clc8503

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Hey OP, I'm also a full-time MT working nights and I feel your pain! I've just tried to do about 2 hours of productive studying each evening with my full length tests saved for my weekends off! Its rough but will be over soon enough! ( less than 2 weeks for me!)...

...A little off topic, but to the OP, clc8503, and any other Med Techs who have replied...where do you guys plan to include your medical technology internship (if you did one) on AAMCAS and/or AACOMAS? Are you going to sumbit a "transcript" from the program? I got letter grades in the program I did and definitely want to include them on my app; I feel like I would be implying my grades weren't good if I didn't include them. ha. Its tough to see where it fits because its obviously not a graduate program but was also not related to my undergrad institution at all. Help?

BlameItOnTheOH,

I sent you a private message. Perhaps we could brain storm on the matter. It is very tough to incorporate your MT experience/internship into your personal statement without diluting its value. This is due to the character cap/limit. However, it is essential that we find a way to do it. I mean, we still have to talk about our volunteer experience, shadowing, ECs, etc. Anyways, I sent you my contact info for facebook. Hit me up if you want to exchange ideas.
 

g8orlife

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Studying 60-90 hours a week for the MCAT is ridiculous.

You are spending the same amount of time in one day that the OP can spend in a week.

I'm telling the OP to not try and compete with crazy people who spend 60-90hrs a week studying because the OP doesn't have the luxury. It make sense. People like you who tell the OP to try and score in the 99th percentile, aren't helping.

also, if you don't score a 40+ I think that is a failure because I've never heard of anyone studying so much. You are in the 99.999th percentile in hours spent per week studying. Actual, probably the 100th percentile in hours spent studying per week.
Ok, this battle is futile. Except for a majority vote (which Phil & I would win:rolleyes:) , I think the only way we could see which advice is actually more helpful to the OP is for the OP to actually tell us which advice is more helpful ... And unless he/she does, let's just agree to disagree.

BTW - Phil worked as hard as he did in order to reach his peak. Mega, there's no need to call what he did to prevent failure, a failure. Personally, I think that's disparaging and uncalled for.
 

MegaSpectacular

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Ok, this battle is futile. Except for a majority vote (which Phil & I would win:rolleyes:) , I think the only way we could see which advice is actually more helpful to the OP is for the OP to actually tell us which advice is more helpful ... And unless he/she does, let's just agree to disagree.

BTW - Phil worked as hard as he did in order to reach his peak. Mega, there's no need to call what he did to prevent failure, a failure. Personally, I think that's disparaging and uncalled for.
Majority vote? yeah, just like the healthcare bill.

I find it funny that the guy is studying 60-90 hrs a week, then telling people it is about how efficient you are, not about how you study:laugh:. The second problem with talking about efficient studying, then mentioning you spend 24 hrs a week surfing the internet also sounds idiotic.

I do think if you spend your entire existence (16 hours in a day), sitting down and studying in a chair then you better get a high score on the MCAT. Seriously who does that?

I will be waiting for his 38+ score on the 30+ thread. It is funny when people with zero success all of the sudden can become an authority on how the entire world should prepare for the MCAT.
 

RogueUnicorn

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My Physics mentor/tutor scored a 43, and I liked his quote: "Everyone should be going for a 45. You should get pissed when you even get one wrong."

I don't know about you... but when I hear something like that, it makes me want to study and learn as much from my mistakes as possible.

As bleargh would say, "45T or go home"
LOL! I was JUST thinking 'I like this tutor guy...'

45T or GTFO. Ferrealz. Also, guy prognosticating other people's scores after having taken the MCAT less than a week ago, cool your jets, you sound stupid.

edit: OP, you're in a terrible situation, one I personally find untenable - you need to reduce your work hours, or reduce your commute, or both; how is your background in the science already, though? if you're strong about the actual content, then this is much less an issue. i also think it's not a great plan to try to switch your cycle a mere 4 days in advance of the mcat. i understand bills need to be paid - i do, really. but this is a make or break kind of test, and whatever you can do to make time to study will be critical. cancel cable. go to the most basic cell plan. get a roommate. move closer to work. do whatever you have to, because if i may be blunt, to me it seems you are not heading down a particularly successful path.
 
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PhilIvey

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Majority vote? yeah, just like the healthcare bill.

I find it funny that the guy is studying 60-90 hrs a week, then telling people it is about how efficient you are, not about how you study:laugh:. The second problem with talking about efficient studying, then mentioning you spend 24 hrs a week surfing the internet also sounds idiotic.

I do think if you spend your entire existence (16 hours in a day), sitting down and studying in a chair then you better get a high score on the MCAT. Seriously who does that?

I will be waiting for his 38+ score on the 30+ thread. It is funny when people with zero success all of the sudden can become an authority on how the entire world should prepare for the MCAT.
Relearning 4 years of material in 4 weeks is efficient. I only criticized you. Also Bleargh, I said likely. By the way, you do realize that when kids study for Step 1 they man put in 12+ hours a day. That is efficient. I think it's funny that kids think that 12 hours is too much. It's not. I studied for 4 hours and took 1 hour off. That is efficient. I hit 37 or better on every AAMC. I'm willing to bet mega isn't at that level. Finally, you mock me for spending 24 hours a week on the web. How many hours do you spend on SDN? Lol. that is the pot calling the kettle black.

Bleargh, I finished the BS and PS with over 20 minutes. I have a photographic memory. I remembered 45/52 questions and went and double checked them. I posted the entire test and it got removed due to fear of the copyright rules. The BS I missed 4 discretes and that's it. So, yes, I feel that I got at worst a 14 PS, 11 verbal, and a 12 BS. I got 37 40 and 41 on my AAMCs. So, I dont' see how it's foolish to think I hit that high.

In closing, you're hilarious. I said 12-16 hours of studying, however, there were times where I space off. Finally, you aren't really good at extrapolating are you? The average kid studies 300 hours according to SN2ED and if you go back to past posts.

with this in mind, I did 10 hours of actual work for 5 days, I studied 21 days this includes practice tests. Mega, what is 21*10=210. I said around 220 hours. I did in one month what most kids do in 3 months so quit acting like I studied more when in fact I spent much less on the beast than most kids do. How many kids study for 4 months and don't break 32 and study MORE than I did when you tally hours. I will post my 38+ and will provide a screen shot for a few members to preserve anonymity. Why don't you, something tells me you wont' hit that high.

You say 60-90 when I never studied more than 50 hours over a 7 day span. Nice try buddy. I criticized your advice. I never said my manner was the best. Way to draw conclusions that were never made. I'm done posting in this thread. You posted horrible advice. I told the OP that he/she CAN do it over a 3-4 month period which is EQUAL to what I did in ONE month. How your interpreted this is beyond me. I was hitting 37+. So, if the OP can study efficiently like I did and get around 200+ hours he/she CAN hit 37+. You on the other hand said that he/she should hit 33. However, I'm the idiot and fool. Got it. Belittling someone which you implicitly did by your advice is good. Telling someone to just space it out and they can still do well is stupid. Got it. I at least took it and dominated AAMCS and pretty sure I dominated the test. NYR56 said the same thing and hit a 39. It's not out of line to think I did likewise based on my testing history.
 
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PhilIvey

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Majority vote? yeah, just like the healthcare bill.

I find it funny that the guy is studying 60-90 hrs a week, then telling people it is about how efficient you are, not about how you study:laugh:. The second problem with talking about efficient studying, then mentioning you spend 24 hrs a week surfing the internet also sounds idiotic.

I do think if you spend your entire existence (16 hours in a day), sitting down and studying in a chair then you better get a high score on the MCAT. Seriously who does that?

I will be waiting for his 38+ score on the 30+ thread. It is funny when people with zero success all of the sudden can become an authority on how the entire world should prepare for the MCAT.
I don't post much. I joined SDN in may 2006. I observed the vast amount of kids who dominated the MCAT. You'll be quite surprised that a decent number advised to study 12-15 hours over 3-4 weeks. I liked it and had the wherewithal to do it. I never once insinuated that my plan was best. My point which you clearly missed, was that the OP should shoot for a goal say 200 hours and not be worried about being able to go 6 or 7 in one day. He/she can still hit a 35 which I and Vihsadas believe is the magic number most kids can reach. I'm done here. I will refrain from commenting on such matters. Good luck OP and if you grind it out you will be fine. Don't lower your expectation.

In closing, I loved watching the poster SurftheIOP. He stated his goal was a 33 back in December. He studied the least among the major posters for 01/30 and got a 38. The point is, that the amount doesn't matter as long as you have a good base. I had some serious issues in Gen Chem and O-chem so that's what I studied. I didn't study biology and physics except for the tests. If you don't have as many glaring areas as I did, you're in even better shape to hit that 37+. If you take the AAMCS and figure out what you got wrong you will be fine. Don't panic and just use common sense it won't intimidate you.
 

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Relearning 4 years of material in 4 weeks is efficient. I only criticized you. Also Bleargh, I said likely. By the way, you do realize that when kids study for Step 1 they man put in 12+ hours a day. That is efficient. I think it's funny that kids think that 12 hours is too much. It's not. I studied for 4 hours and took 1 hour off. That is efficient. I hit 37 or better on every AAMC. I'm willing to bet mega isn't at that level. Finally, you mock me for spending 24 hours a week on the web. How many hours do you spend on SDN? Lol. that is the pot calling the kettle black.

Bleargh, I finished the BS and PS with over 20 minutes. I have a photographic memory. I remembered 45/52 questions and went and double checked them. I posted the entire test and it got removed due to fear of the copyright rules. The BS I missed 4 discretes and that's it. So, yes, I feel that I got at worst a 14 PS, 11 verbal, and a 12 BS. I got 37 40 and 41 on my AAMCs. So, I dont' see how it's foolish to think I hit that high.

In closing, you're hilarious. I said 12-16 hours of studying, however, there were times where I space off. Finally, you aren't really good at extrapolating are you? The average kid studies 300 hours according to SN2ED and if you go back to past posts.

with this in mind, I did 10 hours of actual work for 5 days, I studied 21 days this includes practice tests. Mega, what is 21*10=210. I said around 220 hours. I did in one month what most kids do in 3 months so quit acting like I studied more when in fact I spent much less on the beast than most kids do. How many kids study for 4 months and don't break 32 and study MORE than I did when you tally hours. I will post my 38+ and will provide a screen shot for a few members to preserve anonymity. Why don't you, something tells me you wont' hit that high.

You say 60-90 when I never studied more than 50 hours over a 7 day span. Nice try buddy. I criticized your advice. I never said my manner was the best. Way to draw conclusions that were never made. I'm done posting in this thread. You posted horrible advice. I told the OP that he/she CAN do it over a 3-4 month period which is EQUAL to what I did in ONE month. How your interpreted this is beyond me. I was hitting 37+. So, if the OP can study efficiently like I did and get around 200+ hours he/she CAN hit 37+. You on the other hand said that he/she should hit 33. However, I'm the idiot and fool. Got it. Belittling someone which you implicitly did by your advice is good. Telling someone to just space it out and they can still do well is stupid. Got it. I at least took it and dominated AAMCS and pretty sure I dominated the test. NYR56 said the same thing and hit a 39. It's not out of line to think I did likewise based on my testing history.
The problem is you go around saying 12-16 hours a day 5 times, then say "oh yeah, only 8-10 hrs a day." Reality is you spent wayyyy too much time and now try to back track by saying, "yeah, I wasn't studying... I was... surfing the web." That sounds even dumber because it sounds like you have no life.

"Yeah, I was studying only 10 hrs a day but the other 4-6 hours I was sitting in a chair surfing the web."

Really? 16 hours a day in a chair.

I don't care if you score a 45 because you are completely unbalanced. A high score isn't worth your life.

I have a photographic memory. I remembered 45/52 questions and went and double checked them. I posted the entire test and it got removed due to fear of the copyright rules.
You forgot to mention... "I am very arrogant and think I'm really cool. I sit in a chair 16 hours a day."

Don't worry, we all picked it up in the subtext.
 

MegaSpectacular

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In closing, I loved watching the poster SurftheIOP. He stated his goal was a 33 back in December. He studied the least among the major posters for 01/30 and got a 38. The point is, that the amount doesn't matter as long as you have a good base. I had some serious issues in Gen Chem and O-chem so that's what I studied. I didn't study biology and physics except for the tests. If you don't have as many glaring areas as I did, you're in even better shape to hit that 37+. If you take the AAMCS and figure out what you got wrong you will be fine. Don't panic and just use common sense it won't intimidate you.
anecdotal evidence means nothing. And there is no way for me to know how long any single person studied. You said you studied 16 hours a day and then before we know it you said you only studied 10 hrs a day.

I don't and can't really know what surfer___ did. Sometimes people score 5 points above their average. E.g., They are good at circuits and 3 circuits passages are on the MCAT. Doesn't mean there is some trend forming.

Also lol at you saying I spend 25 hrs a week on SDN. Noooo way. 5 hrs? Mayyyybe. 3 hrs, yeah probably. 25 hrs? Lol. No, no chance.
 

PhilIvey

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anecdotal evidence means nothing. And there is no way for me to know how long any single person studied. You said you studied 16 hours a day and then before we know it you said you only studied 10 hrs a day.

I don't and can't really know what surfer___ did. Sometimes people score 5 points above their average. E.g., They are good at circuits and 3 circuits passages are on the MCAT. Doesn't mean there is some trend forming.

Also lol at you saying I spend 25 hrs a week on SDN. Noooo way. 5 hrs? Mayyyybe. 3 hrs, yeah probably. 25 hrs? Lol. No, no chance.
I do. It shows he's a gamer. The fact that you don't see this is hilarious. I studied a total of 220 hours. If a person "studies" 5 hours, how many people actually study 5 hours. Most probably actually study 3 hours. Your mind tends to wander. So, when I say 12-16 hours. That is including breaks. I'm done. You gave horrible advice. I never once said the OP should follow my plan. I love how you IGNORED the fact that i said I took 2 days off. Do you really think I could sit down from 9 AM to 12 PM and ''study"? LOL. I find it funny that you say that I studied more than most.

Let's assume I averaged 14 hours. I stated 12-16 hours for four weeks with a couple days off. 14*5=70*4 weeks =280 Hours. how is 280 hours in the top percentile when SN2ED and numerous posts have stated the average student studies 300. Nice try. You failed in all of your attempts to belittle me. So, even going with the extreme I still studied less than the average person.

Bleargh, studied 5 hours a day for 3 months. Let's assume that he did 25 per week for 12 weeks, that comes out to 300. So, einstein, one can see that it's not how quickly you reach the hours but that you reach them.

I will give you the following link: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showpost.php?p=6283164&postcount=740. This is only one of over 50 examples I could give of kids who went 12-15 hours a day. The great Vihsadas said he went as much as 14 hours in a day. Here is the key part from this post: I did most of my studying over ~3 weeks during winter break, about 12-15 hours a day. Fenguin must be a loser. I did his plan but did it one week longer. Fenguin hit a 42. He is far more intelligent than me so I won't get that high but don't act like no one does this.
 
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PhilIvey

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anecdotal evidence means nothing. And there is no way for me to know how long any single person studied. You said you studied 16 hours a day and then before we know it you said you only studied 10 hrs a day.

I don't and can't really know what surfer___ did. Sometimes people score 5 points above their average. E.g., They are good at circuits and 3 circuits passages are on the MCAT. Doesn't mean there is some trend forming.

Also lol at you saying I spend 25 hrs a week on SDN. Noooo way. 5 hrs? Mayyyybe. 3 hrs, yeah probably. 25 hrs? Lol. No, no chance.

RapplixGMed: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showpost.php?p=6287709&postcount=760
During winter break (4 weeks), I studied up to 12 hr a day for it since it was right after break ended.

In closing, I had to hit on your obviously erroneous information which implied that I studied more when there is no way I exceeded 280 and I actually studied for around 220. The 30+ scorers are only a few. You haven't been on SDN as much as I have been and if you had, you would have seen the old paper tests had kids who posted their strategies within say April 2005 MCAT.


I picked the aforementioned two because I didn't feel like sifting through the old threads. I'm done here. I owned you and showed you that my manner is not stupid and not ridiculous. There are kids who study 600 plus hours but I'd bet you mock them. My point was that the OP shouldn't despair about not being ABLE to study 400 hours. A goal of 200 is good and more than enough to well.

You can go at a snail's pace and reach it which is what the OP has to do. Or, you can go at the hair's pace and reach it. It doesn't matter. I'm done, arguing with you is useless. I'm sure you'll say it's circumstantial. However it's not. I know 4 kids who got 38 or better and not a single one studied more than 150 hours. These kids are brilliant but everyone acts like you have to study so and so hours. You don't. How you couldn't see that one can reach 220 hours in 4 weeks or 3 months but as long as they reach it is what's important is beyond me. LOL. :laugh: Good luck, you'll need it.
 

MegaSpectacular

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RapplixGMed: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showpost.php?p=6287709&postcount=760
During winter break (4 weeks), I studied up to 12 hr a day for it since it was right after break ended.

In closing, I had to hit on your obviously erroneous information which implied that I studied more when there is no way I exceeded 280 and I actually studied for around 220. The 30+ scorers are only a few. You haven't been on SDN as much as I have been and if you had, you would have seen the old paper tests had kids who posted their strategies within say April 2005 MCAT.


I picked the aforementioned two because I didn't feel like sifting through the old threads. I'm done here. I owned you and showed you that my manner is not stupid and not ridiculous. There are kids who study 600 plus hours but I'd bet you mock them. My point was that the OP shouldn't despair about not being ABLE to study 400 hours. A goal of 200 is good and more than enough to well.

You can go at a snail's pace and reach it which is what the OP has to do. Or, you can go at the hair's pace and reach it. It doesn't matter. I'm done, arguing with you is useless. I'm sure you'll say it's circumstantial. However it's not. I know 4 kids who got 38 or better and not a single one studied more than 150 hours. These kids are brilliant but everyone acts like you have to study so and so hours. You don't. How you couldn't see that one can reach 220 hours in 4 weeks or 3 months but as long as they reach it is what's important is beyond me. LOL. :laugh: Good luck, you'll need it.
seriously, I can't take anything you say seriously after you told everyone you studied 12-16 hours a day. I just see an out of shape kid sitting in a chair alone in a room every waking hour of his life.

Look, this guy studied 4 weeks for 3 hours a day... that is 13 hours less per day than you! I would call that efficient. Oh and he got a 39, higher than you also. See how anyone can find individual stories?
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showpost.php?p=8443272&postcount=511

If you remember the original thing we were talking about:

OP has no time (15 hours free per week).

Mega says: OP, with little time free per week don't try to compete with people who have nothing to do all day (i.e. can sit in a chair 16 hours a day), instead either free up time or set more realistic goals.

PhilIvey says: I disagree. I have no life and studied all day and did very well. I also know many others who studied 12 hrs a day and did well. I am super efficient and have a super duper photographic memory.

Mega says: Doesn't change the fact that the OP doesn't have time. And you aren't even talking about situations where people lack time! spending 12 hrs a day studying has nothing to do with the OP's situation. There are people who study 3 hrs a day and do better than you, how are you being efficient if you spend 16 hours to do something another guy does in 3 hrs?

PhilIvey says: ... I am going to go surf the web for 4 hrs straight in my room.
 

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