Sep 9, 2015
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I leave for bootcamp this may in about 9 months and have already received the mos grouping of AG which is enlisted aircrew meaning I will end up being a crew chief flying on Marine Corps helicopters, trilotors, or c-130s. Due to the constant movement and relocation of someone in this mos I have read that getting a degree is almost impossible without going the online route. Im hoping to go to medical school though when I get out and am wondering what the best way to go about this would be? I am really hoping I don't have to wait to start to get my bachelor's degree until my 5 year marine commitment is over. What are my chances of getting into a medical school with an online degree and if it was possible would a pre-med degree be the best option?
 

Darth Doc

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Jun 22, 2013
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What are my chances of getting into a medical school with an online degree and if it was possible would a pre-med degree be the best option?
Chances? not good with online only classes. A number of (most?/all?) medical schools specifically state no online classes for the hard sciences and you'll need a number of those. You're joining the only service without any medical MOS, so you won't get any medical experience that will help you through them.

My recommendation is to plan out exactly what you need and take the classes you can (english, etc...) online. Find the medical schools that will accept some online classes and make sure you only take the courses they'll accept. Then when you know you're going to be somewhere for 6 months, try to get a science or two done. In the meantime, volunteer in something you love. Shadow the docs at the TMCs. Get medical experience if you can. Those are all things that acceptance committees look at in addition to the numbers.

With a constantly moving MOS, you won't be ready to jump into medical school as soon as you get out in 5 years, but you'll have great life experience and have some of the pre-reqs done.
 
OP
S
Sep 9, 2015
2
0
Thank you so much for your quick and thorough response. You answered many of my questions and have even given me tips to make myself even more competitive which were greatly appreciated. The only question I do still have is what major would be the best for my situation? Would pre-med be the sure fire major to go for or are there other majors that would make me just as competitive and still give me a good bachelor's degree I can have a career with if medical school didn't work out?
 

Darth Doc

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Would pre-med be the sure fire major to go for or are there other majors that would make me just as competitive and still give me a good bachelor's degree I can have a career with if medical school didn't work out?
There are no sure fire majors. Some universities no longer have a pre-med degree, because it's useless if you don't get into medical school. As long as you have a bachelors degree and have completed the pre-reqs, you're good. And be sure to include a letter from an officer O-3 or higher as one of your recommendations. It's unique and will help you stand out.
 
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trev5150

I leave for bootcamp this may in about 9 months and have already received the mos grouping of AG which is enlisted aircrew meaning I will end up being a crew chief flying on Marine Corps helicopters, trilotors, or c-130s. Due to the constant movement and relocation of someone in this mos I have read that getting a degree is almost impossible without going the online route. Im hoping to go to medical school though when I get out and am wondering what the best way to go about this would be? I am really hoping I don't have to wait to start to get my bachelor's degree until my 5 year marine commitment is over. What are my chances of getting into a medical school with an online degree and if it was possible would a pre-med degree be the best option?
Devilpup,

Speaking as someone who's been there and done that in the wing you won't even have time for online classes. You will be on floats, deployed and switching shifts constantly and online courses keep a schedule, too. Do your five, SAVE ALL YOUR MONEY, get out and do the dew. Don't waste any of your benefits on these online criminal rackets that vacuu-suck a Marine's education benefits and maybe give them a worthless piece of paper at the end. NO MATTER WHAT THEY TELL YOU, and you will be pressured by everyone, including your chain of command will lean on you, telling you it's worth promotion points. Max out education points with BS MCI's for free. They're stupid easy.

I'm serious. Save every penny of your measly paycheck. Don't buy a car, don't buy a motorcycle. AND DONT GET ANYONE PREGNANT FOR GODS SAKE. DO. NOT. GET. MARRIED.
You don't need a Dependapottamus sucking your resources dry.
If you have aspirations after the Marine Corps follow Trevor's Rules and you will be fine.
Good luck, Semper Fi and if it feels wrong it definitely is.
 

Darth Doc

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If you don't waste your GI bill, you can get low undergrad costs when you're ready with the yellow ribbon program at a state school. It's worth it to save the GI bill, because in some cases it will entirely pay for medical school. Yellow ribbon isn't available for grad programs.
 
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Goro

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Invest in MSAR Online and check which schools allow online classwork int he pre-reqs. My school is OK with them as lone as the coursework is from an accredited university.

Once your service commitment is finished, then finish your degree.

While you're in the service, shadow some doctors.

And many thanks for your service to our country. Semper Fi!

I leave for bootcamp this may in about 9 months and have already received the mos grouping of AG which is enlisted aircrew meaning I will end up being a crew chief flying on Marine Corps helicopters, trilotors, or c-130s. Due to the constant movement and relocation of someone in this mos I have read that getting a degree is almost impossible without going the online route. Im hoping to go to medical school though when I get out and am wondering what the best way to go about this would be? I am really hoping I don't have to wait to start to get my bachelor's degree until my 5 year marine commitment is over. What are my chances of getting into a medical school with an online degree and if it was possible would a pre-med degree be the best option?
 

Gandyy

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I have heard patient's say they feel more secure in a physician's hands if he or she was in the army. It shows strong character usually, and people hold soldiers in high regard. So it definitely helps your application, but you dont want to do too many things at once.

I agree with Goro. I would finish my service commitment first.
 

G.Ming

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Jun 28, 2015
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Most bases actually partner with local schools to hold classes on base. They are typically at a much faster pace which could possibly work with (some are hybrid so it will be online and in class but they tend to understand if you just turn in work and never actually show up). Depending how much you are gone that may work. Unfortunately I am not 100% sure of Marine bases as I am more familiar with Air Force, Army, and Navy.

If you can figure a way to get your degree while AD do it so that way you will still have your GI Bill for Med School once you get out. That was my plan but I was MEB/Medically retired so I barely even was able to use my Tuition Assistance.
 
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trev5150

Most bases actually partner with local schools to hold classes on base. They are typically at a much faster pace which could possibly work with (some are hybrid so it will be online and in class but they tend to understand if you just turn in work and never actually show up). Depending how much you are gone that may work. Unfortunately I am not 100% sure of Marine bases as I am more familiar with Air Force, Army, and Navy.

If you can figure a way to get your degree while AD do it so that way you will still have your GI Bill for Med School once you get out. That was my plan but I was MEB/Medically retired so I barely even was able to use my Tuition Assistance.
While you're in the service, shadow some doctors.
You guys (and the OP) need need to understand how busy he is going to be. The air wing is a 24/7 operation that is perpetually understaffed. As air crew he will be allowed to work a maximum of 12 hour days, and he will be working all of that. He won't be able to cut out of any of it consistently enough to commit to any sort of schedule that isn't the squadron's flight schedule/ground training schedule.
Trust me when I say that he's not getting any thing done academically while he's active duty CONUS or otherwise. He can count on deploying at least twice, for 7 to 8 months at a time. OPTEMPO is always high.

Even when he's in the States he's going to go to Mojave Viper and Steel Knight at 29 Palms for a month at a clip. He'll go to Yuma for WTI at least twice, and that's a two month evolution. Internet access in the field? Nope.

Course availability?Forget science-with-lab pre-reqs. Those facilities just don't exist. You might be able to do some gen ed degree requirement stuff.

As far as shadowing doctors, I wish I could say he had the time or the access. This is highly unlikely. More likely hew will be standing a BS duty, counting gas masks, running another 3 miles, holding a flashlight, going to the rifle range, going to the CS chamber, doing safety drills, practicing emergency procedures, wiping hydraulic fluid off something, cleaning something else, showing up to brief a sortie at 0230, then standing by to stand by for hours at a time. He will be folding tents, servicing aircraft, and cleaning many many many toilet bowls.

If you want clinical experience, become a Navy corpsman or medic or health care tech MOS in any other branch. The Suck is The Suck and your personal agenda makes no nevermind to the bosses (who are, if you're only going to do one enlistment pretty much everyone). The mission comes first and your goals are on hold for the time you are there.

If you want to get school work done in the Marine Corps, be an 01XX Admin POG. They work office hours, never deploy and some of them walk out after 20 years with MBAs. They are house cats and hated by the rest of the Corps for this very reason.

This is based on my 5.5 years as Marine Corps Air Wing. I was a 7314 UAV Operator, NATOPS Evaluator, and Standardization Board member. I was also the Squadron Armorer (Gun Counting B, Classified Material Control Center Custodian (Vault B), SORTS NCO (Broken Stuff Counting B), Floor Buffer, Advanced, Phone Watch B and the guy that had to run to the airport to pick up new joins (Step-N-Fetch-It).

Other services experience in these matters don't apply. They always seem to have plenty of people, plenty of money and plenty of time. The Marine Corps has none of those things. They have work.
 
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Goro

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The other services have it easy!
Semper Fi!

You guys (and the OP) need need to understand how busy he is going to be. The air wing is a 24/7 operation that is perpetually understaffed. As air crew he will be allowed to work a maximum of 12 hour days, and he will be working all of that. He won't be able to cut out of any of it consistently enough to commit to any sort of schedule that isn't the squadron's flight schedule/ground training schedule.
Trust me when I say that he's not getting any thing done academically while he's active duty CONUS or otherwise. He can count on deploying at least twice, for 7 to 8 months at a time. OPTEMPO is always high.

Even when he's in the States he's going to go to Mojave Viper and Steel Knight at 29 Palms for a month at a clip. He'll go to Yuma for WTI at least twice, and that's a two month evolution. Internet access in the field? Nope.

Course availability?Forget science-with-lab pre-reqs. Those facilities just don't exist. You might be able to do some gen ed degree requirement stuff.

As far as shadowing doctors, I wish I could say he had the time or the access. This is highly unlikely. More likely hew will be standing a BS duty, counting gas masks, running another 3 miles, holding a flashlight, going to the rifle range, going to the CS chamber, doing safety drills, practicing emergency procedures, wiping hydraulic fluid off something, cleaning something else, showing up to brief a sortie at 0230, then standing by to stand by for hours at a time. He will be folding tents, servicing aircraft, and cleaning many many many toilet bowls.

If you want clinical experience, become a Navy corpsman or medic or health care tech MOS in any other branch. The Suck is The Suck and your personal agenda makes no nevermind to the bosses (who are, if you're only going to do one enlistment pretty much everyone). The mission comes first and your goals are on hold for the time you are there.

If you want to get school work done in the Marine Corps, be an 01XX Admin POG. They work office hours, never deploy and some of them walk out after 20 years with MBAs. They are house cats and hated by the rest of the Corps for this very reason.

This is based on my 5.5 years as Marine Corps Air Wing. I was a 7314 UAV Operator, NATOPS Evaluator, and Standardization Board member. I was also the Squadron Armorer (Gun Counting B, Classified Material Control Center Custodian (Vault B), SORTS NCO (Broken Stuff Counting B), Floor Buffer, Advanced, Phone Watch B and the guy that had to run to the airport to pick up new joins (Step-N-Fetch-It).

Other services experience in these matters don't apply. They always seem to have plenty of people, plenty of money and plenty of time. The Marine Corps has none of those things. They have work.
 
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trev5150

OP, your recruiter is specifically trained to tell you exactly what you want to hear. He's spent 6 months at the best sales academy in the world: The USMC Recruiter School at MCRD San Diego. He'll never tell you that there's something you won't be able to do. He won't lie to you either. He will skirt around these issues by telling you everything that's theoretically available to every Marine.

If you have no problem with anything I've said, then by all means go. You'll have an amazing time and learn a lot. It will change your life forever and for the better.

You have to understand that this is a 5 year commitment of your life forsaking all other things. From the moment you step on those yellow footprints your time is not your own. You are sacrificing your freedom for others. You forego most of the rights and privileges that others enjoy. You're not even entitled to express an opinion. Not S-ing TFU after being told to STFU has actual repercussions. You better now that.

You have a choice all the way up until the time you ship. You will be provided many moments of truth along the way to that place.

Not being a grunt doesn't mean your life isn't in danger every day. One day the entire Marine Corps had an operational pause because some kid pulled some razor wire out of the back of a truck. It was attached to something else which came out of the truck and landed on his chest and killed him instantly.

Just a few months ago a good friend of mine lost 4 squadron mates in Nepal while they were there on relief efforts after that earthquake. Their UH-1Y crashed in the Himalayas and they didn't find the wreck for nearly a week.

Think real hard about it.
 
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trev5150

If you don't waste your GI bill, you can get low undergrad costs when you're ready with the yellow ribbon program at a state school. It's worth it to save the GI bill, because in some cases it will entirely pay for medical school. Yellow ribbon isn't available for grad programs.
Yellow Ribbon is being done away with since all higher education institutions must provide in-state tuition to veterans.
 

aftomdhopeful

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Aug 3, 2015
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Devilpup,

Speaking as someone who's been there and done that in the wing you won't even have time for online classes. You will be on floats, deployed and switching shifts constantly and online courses keep a schedule, too. Do your five, SAVE ALL YOUR MONEY, get out and do the dew. Don't waste any of your benefits on these online criminal rackets that vacuu-suck a Marine's education benefits and maybe give them a worthless piece of paper at the end. NO MATTER WHAT THEY TELL YOU, and you will be pressured by everyone, including your chain of command will lean on you, telling you it's worth promotion points. Max out education points with BS MCI's for free. They're stupid easy.

I'm serious. Save every penny of your measly paycheck. Don't buy a car, don't buy a motorcycle. AND DONT GET ANYONE PREGNANT FOR GODS SAKE. DO. NOT. GET. MARRIED.
You don't need a Dependapottamus sucking your resources dry.
If you have aspirations after the Marine Corps follow Trevor's Rules and you will be fine.
Good luck, Semper Fi and if it feels wrong it definitely is.
This guy knows what he is talking about. Do not waste your time on any of the online programs offered on base. I will specifically call out American Military University, University of Maryland University College, University of Phoenix, College America, Carrington College and whatever TURO is calling itself these days as being especially predatory to young enlisted members. The ONLY online program that works with veterans that I have any respect for is Colorado State University, but they do not have any science programs. I've spent a lot of time dealing with the education offices on many bases both for myself and my enlisted airmen. Do not even waste your time. They will sell you poor programs, and do not offer any useful advice, as they are geared toward career military members completing throw away degrees. Your best bets are to use TA to attend local community colleges if you have time, and save up your GI bill to go to a brick and mortar university after your contract is complete. Also, keep meticulous medical records. You would be amazed at how much disability you can qualify for, even as a young person, and that VA pension will go a long way toward helping you eat while in medical school. On the off chance you do get stationed with a C-130 unit, you may get lucky and have a medical mission. I was a C-130 officer, and I flew with several physicians in Afghanistan for combat trauma and humanitarian aid. You would gain that experience, which will help your extracurriculars. For now, your best option is to focus on doing your job well, saving as much money as you possibly can, volunteering in clinical settings, and plan on enrolling in school after you finish your contract.

-Former O3
 
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68PGunner

Again, a lot of vets here are offering you some great advice already. Anyway, I'm an active duty soldier here. I literally go on missions to the middle of nowhere for a 30-50 days every 3-4 months. Do you honestly think that I have time to do any education? It's not happening. Regardless of what the military may say, the environment isn't conductive towards pursuing your education. If you still feel the need to serve, I would go to a community college on base and knock out a bunch of electives first. The science courses need to be taken at a brick and mortar school.
 
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68PGunner

Yellow Ribbon is being done away with since all higher education institutions must provide in-state tuition to veterans.
Actually, it's still a great option especially for prestigious private universities. If someone can get into schools like Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Harvard, etc..., the Yellow Ribbons will ensure a full ride. This is one of the reasons why I'm not touching my post 9/11 benefit but will instead give it to one of my kids.
 
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trev5150

Actually, it's still a great option especially for prestigious private universities. If someone can get into schools like Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Harvard, etc..., the Yellow Ribbons will ensure a full ride. This is one of the reasons why I'm not touching my post 9/11 benefit but will instead give it to one of my kids.
Nah brother I'm saying the program is dead. I was told the other day by my schools' VA Coordinator that the Yellow Ribbon Program is being done away with in light of the new legislation dictating that all institutions charge in-state tuition rates for veterans.

There's a direct correlation between the Post-WWII explosion of new colleges and universities and the creation of the GI Bill.

You're supposed to go to war, come home, get married, buy a Levitt house (with a VA home loan), start making babies, finish your degree at the new college down the road, get a job and start running up credit.

The people running this country want us to go to school and make more taxable income. That doesn't mean they actually want us filthy proles in their cloistered hallowed halls, like Yale, Harvard, et cetera. If you can get scholarship and/or loan money they'll grudgingly let you or your kid in there, but they don't gave to like it.

Class war rant over. The point remains, Yellow Ribbon is going away.
 
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68PGunner

Nah brother I'm saying the program is dead. I was told the other day by my schools' VA Coordinator that the Yellow Ribbon Program is being done away with in light of the new legislation dictating that all institutions charge in-state tuition rates for veterans.

There's a direct correlation between the Post-WWII explosion of new colleges and universities and the creation of the GI Bill.

You're supposed to go to war, come home, get married, buy a Levitt house (with a VA home loan), start making babies, finish your degree at the new college down the road, get a job and start running up credit.

The people running this country want us to go to school and make more taxable income. That doesn't mean they actually want us filthy proles in their cloistered hallowed halls, like Yale, Harvard, et cetera. If you can get scholarship and/or loan money they'll grudgingly let you or your kid in there, but they don't gave to like it.

Class war rant over. The point remains, Yellow Ribbon is going away.
I dont believe that. That might be your VA coordinator's belief, but it's not facts just yet. I just look at the new bill in effect. It places a cap at $20,000 for tuition paid by the post 9/11, allowing room for the Yellow Ribbon Program still to be in effect. I'm going to prepare for the worst but hope for the best.
 
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trev5150

I dont believe that. That might be your VA coordinator's belief, but it's not facts just yet. I just look at the new bill in effect. It places a cap at $20,000 for tuition paid by the post 9/11, allowing room for the Yellow Ribbon Program still to be in effect. I'm going to prepare for the worst but hope for the best.
I've known her for about a year now, and I seriously doubt she would have said it if that's not what she's been given from the higher ups as to what to expect.
I'm not biased here. I got shafted out of 100% and Yellow Ribbon. If I had stayed just a few more weeks I would have gotten the full package.
Like Social Security and Close Air Support, plan for it but don't count on it.
 

MrLogan13

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Do your time, get out and then go to school. Save as much money as you can while you are in, don't blow it partying and drinking like many of your fellow Marines. Do not loan money to your fellow service members claiming to be broke two days after the 1st and 15th. Make full use of your Post 9/11 GI Bill at a real school once you get out. If you have any SC disabilities when you get out, switch to Voc Rehab before you use up all your Post 9/11 benefits.