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Do publications and research experiences during my gap year help when applying to residencies? Is it of value to have 2-3 publications before entering medical school vs someone who has none or will I be required to have sustained research experience through medical school to be competitive for good residencies?
 
Jun 5, 2020
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I think it can definitely help if it was significant / quality work with a reputable lab / institution and it's related to your chosen residency.
 
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Of course it will help, but if you're interested in a competitive specialty you'll have to keep it up through med school.
 

Doctor-S

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Do publications and research experiences during my gap year help when applying to residencies? Is it of value to have 2-3 publications before entering medical school vs someone who has none or will I be required to have sustained research experience through medical school to be competitive for good residencies?
Are you referring to a gap year before beginning M1 ... or to a gap year after completing M4?

What types of "publications?"

What types of "research experiences?"

My answer to your questions are contingent on: (1) actual publications (novel content, authorship, impact factor); and (2) actual research experiences (substantive research activities vs. ordinary lab assistant duties, such as cleaning lab equipment).

For instance:

If you publish an original article about internal medicine research in the NEJM, as the principal investigator and sole author in a gap year before beginning M1 ... well, that would probably get a top-tier IM PD's attention later on when you are applying for residencies. Anyway, I think you get the general idea.

For highly competitive specialties (e.g., neurosurg, ortho), it's common for many medical students to obtain meaningful research experiences throughout medical school. This means medical students interested in competitive residencies routinely pursue meaningful research experiences beginning in the summer between M1-M2, and continue to engage in productive research activities thereafter (including a possible gap year after M4).
 
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KendallJennerSniperLady69

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Are you referring to a gap year before beginning M1 ... or to a gap year after completing M4?

What types of "publications?"

What types of "research experiences?"

My answer to your questions are contingent on: (1) actual publications (novel content, authorship, impact factor); and (2) actual research experiences (substantive research activities vs. ordinary lab assistant duties, such as cleaning lab equipment).

For instance:

If you publish an original article about internal medicine research in the NEJM, as the principal investigator and sole author in a gap year before beginning M1 ... well, that would probably get a top-tier IM PD's attention later on when you are applying for residencies. Anyway, I think you get the general idea.

For highly competitive specialties (e.g., neurosurg, ortho), it's common for many medical students to obtain meaningful research experiences throughout medical school. This means medical students interested in competitive residencies routinely pursue meaningful research experiences beginning in the summer between M1-M2, and continue to engage in productive research activities thereafter (including a possible gap year after M4).
would you consider ophthalmology in the same vein of competitiveness as neurosurg/ortho?
 

MICKY MANTLE

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residency programs won't really care if your research is not related to the specialty
That is not true at all and you probably shouldn't be giving wrong advice on this forum. While research in a field outside of an applicant's residency won't hurt and may help to some degree, resident PDs want to see your commitment to research in the speciality that you are applying to. There will be way too many competitive applicants with research in their respective field. A neurosurgeon, plastic surgeon, ortho, etc. applicant with research not in the respective field is not going to be very helpful to that applicant.

Lastly, the research in your respective field will also afford you many other opportunities, especially meeting well-known physicians that can help mentor and speak to PDs on your behalf.

To sum this up, research is good, focused research when you determine what speciality you want to go in is much better.
 
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May 12, 2020
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Are you referring to a gap year before beginning M1 ... or to a gap year after completing M4?

What types of "publications?"

What types of "research experiences?"

My answer to your questions are contingent on: (1) actual publications (novel content, authorship, impact factor); and (2) actual research experiences (substantive research activities vs. ordinary lab assistant duties, such as cleaning lab equipment).

For instance:

If you publish an original article about internal medicine research in the NEJM, as the principal investigator and sole author in a gap year before beginning M1 ... well, that would probably get a top-tier IM PD's attention later on when you are applying for residencies. Anyway, I think you get the general idea.

For highly competitive specialties (e.g., neurosurg, ortho), it's common for many medical students to obtain meaningful research experiences throughout medical school. This means medical students interested in competitive residencies routinely pursue meaningful research experiences beginning in the summer between M1-M2, and continue to engage in productive research activities thereafter (including a possible gap year after M4).
I have this two-year offer at a T10 in a neurologist's lab as a research associate. I find the research fascinating; however, I was not sure if research in this field would help me if I am trying to get into Internal Medicine down the line since its a different field. I know it's still early only; however, this is a two-year commitment prior to medical school. I was trying to weigh the costs vs benefits of research if I am trying to get into a competitive IM to match into a subspeciality like Hem/Onc years down the line. Based on my discussion with the PI, I will be assisting in the lab ex vivo studies, data analysis, and actually trying to publish these results. Thanks!
 
A

AnatomyGrey12

I have this two-year offer at a T10 in a neurologist's lab as a research associate. I find the research fascinating; however, I was not sure if research in this field would help me if I am trying to get into Internal Medicine down the line since its a different field. I know it's still early only; however, this is a two-year commitment prior to medical school. I was trying to weigh the costs vs benefits of research if I am trying to get into a competitive IM to match into a subspeciality like Hem/Onc years down the line. Based on my discussion with the PI, I will be assisting in the lab ex vivo studies, data analysis, and actually trying to publish these results. Thanks!
Not worth it. 2 years is a long time, and when you consider the lost years of attending salary at least a 500k investment at minimum. Plenty of opportunities to publish in medical school.
 
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Doctor-S

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I have this two-year offer at a T10 in a neurologist's lab as a research associate. I find the research fascinating; however, I was not sure if research in this field would help me if I am trying to get into Internal Medicine down the line since its a different field. I know it's still early only; however, this is a two-year commitment prior to medical school. I was trying to weigh the costs vs benefits of research if I am trying to get into a competitive IM to match into a subspeciality like Hem/Onc years down the line. Based on my discussion with the PI, I will be assisting in the lab ex vivo studies, data analysis, and actually trying to publish these results. Thanks!
You should have abundant opportunities to engage in research as a medical student. You should also be able to find productive research opportunities in internal medicine as well as hematology/oncology, assuming those research projects are offered at your medical school. Feel free to reach out to those departments or PIs to express your interest and go from there.

Although I am not a hematologist/oncologist, I found this link for you (quoted below):


Residency:
After completing medical school, your first three years will generally be spent in residency. Internal medicine and pediatrics are the typical residency tracks completed prior to specializing in hematology or hematology/oncology, although you may enter hematology after completing other general residency programs as well (e.g., combined internal medicine and pediatrics or family practice). Another possible track is to do a pathology residency for approximately three years, after which you could pursue a career in hematopathology, blood banking, or transfusion/laboratory medicine. Each residency program has a unique structure, but all include elements of patient care. These programs generally do not include basic research, although they may offer brief periods of "elective" study, which, in rare cases, may be laboratory-based.

Fellowship:
Fellowship is typically a three-year period in which a physician completes further training in a subspecialty. Fellows may choose to complete a fourth and/or fifth year of fellowship before seeking independent employment. Hematology-related fellowships include adult hematology, coagulation, hematology/oncology, pathology, and pediatric hematology/oncology (there are no pediatric hematology-only programs). During this time the physician is known as a fellow and can focus on a clinical or research career, but all fellows are required to gain competency in clinical research. Although the training of a fellow is more advanced than that of a resident, when treating patients, fellows are still under the supervision of an attending physician who has already completed the fellowship in the relevant subspecialty.


Hope this information is useful to you.
 
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