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GChem - Pauli Exclusion

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by adizzle87, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. adizzle87

    2+ Year Member

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    Heres a quiz question:

    "2 electrons with the same n, l, and ms numbers..."

    and the answer is "can be in different orbitals of the same subshell. My question to everyone is how in the world do you have the same value of n as you do l? I thought l can only go up to n-1, which was why I thought to myself this doesn't even exist and put down "always violate the Pauli exclusion principle." Can anyone tell me how its possible for this to occur?

    The explanation states that it is possible because two electrons could be in the 2p subshell, but if l and n aren't the same isn't it all a moot point?
     
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  3. doc3232

    7+ Year Member

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    you are reading it in a different tone than intended.
    They are just saying that ELECTRONS have the same n value, the same l value, and the same ms value.
    They are not saying n=l=ms.
    :D
     
  4. adizzle87

    2+ Year Member

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    Oh, ok that makes all the sense in the world. Thanks so much!
     

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